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Exercise and Cognition


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Poll: Do you exercise? (219 member(s) have cast votes)

Which descibes you?

  1. You exercise and take nootropics. (162 votes [73.97%])

    Percentage of vote: 73.97%

  2. You exercise, but do not take nootropics. (26 votes [11.87%])

    Percentage of vote: 11.87%

  3. You take nootropics, but do not exercise. (24 votes [10.96%])

    Percentage of vote: 10.96%

  4. You do not exercise and do not take nootropics. (7 votes [3.20%])

    Percentage of vote: 3.20%

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#61 gamesguru

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Posted 12 November 2018 - 02:16 PM

intensity is a subjective thing.  what i consider moderate is intense to most people and extreme for obese individuals.  what i consider extreme is something that resulted in terrible tendonitis around my chest and ankles, and sweat dripping in my eyeballs, pouring across my lips, a heart rate of 170-180, and a shirt so unpleasantly drenched i would often lose it

 

And I think it can be detrimental to mental states pushing yourself that hard too, it messes with opioid and dopamine circuits in a way that more moderate exercise doesn't

 

The benefits probably also apply more to depression and anxiety than anything else.  I wouldn't expect exercise to "cure" ADHD, or anything axis I/II.  But yes in moderation it's a great nootropic, and yes anyone at any level of achievement can benefit from better lifestyle choices like this.



#62 gamesguru

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Posted 12 November 2018 - 09:34 PM

whoever said squats/deadlifts, yes, legs are their own thing.  any other muscle group i find it helps to do 15-20 mins of cardio before or after.  With legs it's not necessary because training legs is cardio, it is endorphins and testosterone all on its own. Plus.. i find anything more than 5-10 min warmup on the elliptical cuts into my leg-day energy too much, which is a bummero

 

i'm sure most are aware but resistance training can have some actually detrimental effects on cardiovascular health[1] if it is left unmitigated by cardio exercise :happy:

 

curious whether that applies to legs or not, if not, it would really confirm my suspicions :laugh:



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#63 experimenting

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 12:05 AM

Excessive weight training leaves me tired-seems to drain me of vitality. Generally, cardio and LIGHT HIIT are the best 'nootropics'. Of course, we do need to strength train, but I do keep it at a relative minimum. Humans were built around their brains, hence why we have such scrawny bodies compared to other species-it seems to me that excessive bulking negates that to a degree. 



#64 gamesguru

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 03:14 AM

Excessive weight training leaves me tired-seems to drain me of vitality. Generally, cardio and LIGHT HIIT are the best 'nootropics'. Of course, we do need to strength train, but I do keep it at a relative minimum. Humans were built around their brains, hence why we have such scrawny bodies compared to other species-it seems to me that excessive bulking negates that to a degree. 

 

The only warning sign i Have with weight training is tendinitis in my armpits.  I eat a clean 2600 cals per day and have plenty of energy leftover for causing trouble

 

Swinging clubs and grinding corn required quite a greater degree of fitness than what most gym rats today enjoy.  We are only scrawny if exercise neglected or food is scarce. Indeed, our well-fed ancient ancestors would crush us in a fitness contest. Indeed, our muscles would not respond better to weight training than that of our chimp counterparts if we were not designed to bulk up and run for our very lives.



#65 experimenting

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 03:21 AM

The only warning sign i Have with weight training is tendinitis in my armpits.  I eat a clean 2600 cals per day and have plenty of energy leftover for causing trouble

 

Swinging clubs and grinding corn required quite a greater degree of fitness than what most gym rats today enjoy.  We are only scrawny if exercise neglected or food is scarce. Indeed, our well-fed ancient ancestors would crush us in a fitness contest. Indeed, our muscles would not respond better to weight training than that of our chimp counterparts if we were not designed to bulk up and run for our very lives.

 

 

Well I'm not sure how you define heavy weight training. I find that if I'm squatting/deadlifting 300 lbs+ multiple times per week I battle chronic fatigue. Cardio generally seems much more agreeable to me; after long runs I feel much better cognitively and emotionally. 

 

Even if we respond well to stimulus there's no denying we sorely lack in strength compared to our animal counterparts. Though that's a bit off topic.

 

For OP and most others seeking to use exercise as a nootropic tool, I would generally stick to cardio, and limit strength training to things like pull-ups, push-ups, etc. Heavy weightlifting may have some detrimental effects vis-a-vis fatigue. 



#66 gamesguru

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 03:55 AM

Well I'm not sure how you define heavy weight training. I find that if I'm squatting/deadlifting 300 lbs+ multiple times per week I battle chronic fatigue. Cardio generally seems much more agreeable to me; after long runs I feel much better cognitively and emotionally. 

 

Even if we respond well to stimulus there's no denying we sorely lack in strength compared to our animal counterparts. Though that's a bit off topic.

 

For OP and most others seeking to use exercise as a nootropic tool, I would generally stick to cardio, and limit strength training to things like pull-ups, push-ups, etc. Heavy weightlifting may have some detrimental effects vis-a-vis fatigue. 

 

An elephant may be stronger than us, but it doesn't mean they're better equipped to gain strength in response to repeated exercise. It's like arguing an average professor outsmarts a child prodigy. What is true today may be false tomorrow.

 

I wouldn't suggest deadlifing more than twice a week, if that.

 

And what causes the fatigue may well be the diet that so often goes hand in hand with the lifestyle.  Chicken breast and brown rice for breakfast, a protein shake for lunch, and a can of tuna and beans for dinner.  It leaves little room for quinoa or vegetables.  Something as simple as a manganese deficiency might be causing fatigue in such poorly planned diets. I'm not undermining the benefits of cardio, just pointing out the importance of controlling variables.



#67 experimenting

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 06:54 PM

I think several studies have shown that aerobic exercise is of maximum benefit to the brain; here's one.

https://www.rd.com/h...ghts-or-cardio/

My n=1 experience is that cardio is much better for cognition-I still don't do enough of it because it's boring and you don't look as good. But again, for the average person who's maybe depressed and wants a cognitive boost, I think cardio is the clear place to start.

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#68 experimenting

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 09:32 PM

An elephant may be stronger than us, but it doesn't mean they're better equipped to gain strength in response to repeated exercise. It's like arguing an average professor outsmarts a child prodigy. What is true today may be false tomorrow.

I wouldn't suggest deadlifing more than twice a week, if that.

And what causes the fatigue may well be the diet that so often goes hand in hand with the lifestyle. Chicken breast and brown rice for breakfast, a protein shake for lunch, and a can of tuna and beans for dinner. It leaves little room for quinoa or vegetables. Something as simple as a manganese deficiency might be causing fatigue in such poorly planned diets. I'm not undermining the benefits of cardio, just pointing out the importance of controlling variables.


Another one:

https://well.blogs.n...-for-the-brain/

I should probably do more cardio :(

Does swimming laps count? Haha




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