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Honokiol / magnolol


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#1 Hedrock

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Posted 01 May 2010 - 06:33 PM


A supplement comes from a wonderful flower.

It as so impressing / you cannot separate magnolol and honokiol:

Magnolol and Honokiol are normally inseparable. Honokiol is easily separable from the protected magnolol acetonide.


Fascinating chemical structure

Anxiolytic, antithrombotic, anti-depressant, anti-emetic, and anti-bacterial.

Magnolol/Honokiol effects:

Anti-tumorigenic activities PMID 12816951

Neurotrophic activity PMID 11934579

Anti-thrombolytic activity PMID 16115372

Effect on learning and memory PMID 19815000

Helps with bronchial asthma PMID 11484418


Please post your experiences with magnolol / honokiol

#2 ken_akiba

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Posted 02 May 2010 - 11:51 AM

Honokiol is a staple for many Japanese health drinks/supplements. Definately Anxiolytic, but it is always used in only minute amount. I think it is due to its relatively strong blood thinning effect.

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#3 Hedrock

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Posted 02 May 2010 - 12:28 PM

Honokiol is a staple for many Japanese health drinks/supplements. Definately Anxiolytic, but it is always used in only minute amount. I think it is due to its relatively strong blood thinning effect.



If you are from Japan, you might know something about the traditional Japanese medicine Saiboku-to. It contains honokiol too.

Is it easy available in Japan? Is it expensive?

I'm very interested.

#4 ken_akiba

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Posted 02 May 2010 - 12:52 PM

Japanese, as any other people around the world, use alternative or folk medicine, it's just that in Japan, this medicine usage is systemized and governed, we call it Kampo system. Saiboku-to is kampo medicine, I do not know whole a lot about it but I remember decades ago one Kampo doctor gave it to me for alleviating asthma, so I know it is used for asthma and again I may be wrong but I recall it contains Korean ginseng, which is not known for being anxiolytic, it is rather a stimulant, so I am not so sure about Saiboku-to's use as anxiolytic. I believe there are better Kampo medicines for anxiety. Anyway, I don't think you need prescription to get this medicine and I do not think it will be horribly expensive, as most Kampo medicines are quite inexpensive.

#5 Hedrock

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Posted 02 May 2010 - 01:09 PM

Interesting the long use of honokiol as herbal medicine in preparations like Saiboku-to.

The anxiolytic ability of Honokiol is scientifically proved.

Evaluation by means of an elevated plus-maze test showed that honokiol was at least 5000 times more potent than Saiboku-to when mice were treated orally for 7 days.

Source: Identification of magnolol and honokiol as anxiolytic agents in extracts of saiboku-to, an oriental herbal medicine.

Why buy something new and experimental if traditional medicine has shown honokiol useful for hundreds of years? Honokiol is cheap.
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#6 blood

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Posted 01 October 2013 - 09:26 AM

New-ish study:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23811337

Biochim Biophys Acta. 2013 Oct;1830(10):4813-9. doi: 10.1016/j.bbagen.2013.06.021. Epub 2013 Jun 27.

Honokiol: a non-adipogenic PPARγ agonist from nature.

Atanasov AG, Wang JN, Gu SP, Bu J, Kramer MP, Baumgartner L, Fakhrudin N, Ladurner A, Malainer C, Vuorinen A, Noha SM, Schwaiger S, Rollinger JM, Schuster D, Stuppner H, Dirsch VM, Heiss EH.

Source
Department of Pharmacognosy, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:
Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists are clinically used to counteract hyperglycemia. However, so far experienced unwanted side effects, such as weight gain, promote the search for new PPARγ activators.

METHODS:
We used a combination of in silico, in vitro, cell-based and in vivo models to identify and validate natural products as promising leads for partial novel PPARγ agonists.

RESULTS:
The natural product honokiol from the traditional Chinese herbal drug Magnolia bark was in silico predicted to bind into the PPARγ ligand binding pocket as dimer. Honokiol indeed directly bound to purified PPARγ ligand-binding domain (LBD) and acted as partial agonist in a PPARγ-mediated luciferase reporter assay. Honokiol was then directly compared to the clinically used full agonist pioglitazone with regard to stimulation of glucose uptake in adipocytes as well as adipogenic differentiation in 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. While honokiol stimulated basal glucose uptake to a similar extent as pioglitazone, it did not induce adipogenesis in contrast to pioglitazone. In diabetic KKAy mice oral application of honokiol prevented hyperglycemia and suppressed weight gain.

CONCLUSION:
We identified honokiol as a partial non-adipogenic PPARγ agonist in vitro which prevented hyperglycemia and weight gain in vivo.

GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE:
This observed activity profile suggests honokiol as promising new pharmaceutical lead or dietary supplement to combat metabolic disease, and provides a molecular explanation for the use of Magnolia in traditional medicine.

© 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.



#7 Anagram 3.3

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 08:45 PM

Its a real shame Honokiol is nearly impossible to obtain in large amounts. :sad:

#8 blood

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 08:05 AM

Its a real shame Honokiol is nearly impossible to obtain in large amounts. :sad:


What do you consider to be a large amount?

Nutricology product:
http://www.swansonvi...90-120-veg-caps

Swansons product:
http://www.swansonvi...L117&csp=SWH225

The Swanson's product has around 180 mg honokiol per capsule.

At that dose, I experienced a very noticeable - unmistakeable - anti-anxiety effect. I also experienced some mild nausea, initially. I couldn't imagine wanting to take more than two of these/ day.

A typical regimen of Relora would provide honokiol at much lower doses:

http://www.jissn.com/content/10/1/37

Relora® is a proprietary blend of a patented extract of the bark of Magnolia officinalis and an extract of the bark of Phellodendron amurense (US Patent Nos. 6,582,735 and 6,814,987). The product is standardized to “not less than 1.5% honokiol and 0.1% berberine.” Subjects ingested 500 mg/day at breakfast (250 mg) and dinner (250 mg) in white opaque capsules or a look-alike placebo that was identical in size, shape and color...




#9 Anagram 3.3

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 08:59 PM

Is it worth it?

#10 airplanepeanuts

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 12:02 AM

I tried Relora sometimes and a high honokiol tablet once. Relora alone is mildly calming. Gives me strange dreams. The honokiol dose actually made me a little drowsy. Because I had nightmares that night and crashed the next day I haven't taken it again. Have to experiment more.

#11 Anagram 3.3

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 11:26 PM

Ingredients of Relora
Relora Proprietary BlendMagnolia Officinalis (Bark) Std To 1.5% Honokiol 3.75 Mg Phellodendron Amurense (Bark) Std To 0.1% Berberine 0.25 Mg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berberine ---
\\
Berberine is an alkaloid with SSNRI like actions in the body.
Berberine has anti-Alzheimer, neurotransmitter modulating, increasing noradrenaline, increasing serotonin, and inhibiting dopaminergic activity.
Berberine also is an agonist for Sigma receptor and the Orexin receptor. Berberine is being investigated for depression.

--Wow! , Perhaps Berberine is the constituent with the pow if you know what I mean. Awhile back I took Berberine but all I remeber was overly positives emotions which made me feel worried in a weird way. BTW taking an antimicrobial drug can have negative side effects on gut microbe function.

#12 airplanepeanuts

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Posted 16 October 2013 - 06:31 PM

The amount of Honokiol and Berberine in Relora is very small compared to supplements sold that contain purified forms of these substances.

#13 blood

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 09:36 AM

Would these in vitro findings be clinically relevant?

How likely is it one would achieve a blood concentration of 50-75 μM taking honokiol orally?

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/23049247

Clin Interv Aging. 2012;7:351-61. doi: 10.2147/CIA.S34034. Epub 2012 Sep 13.

Modulating testosterone pathway: a new strategy to tackle male skin aging?

Bernard P, Scior T, Do QT.

Source
Greenpharma SAS, Orléans, France. philippe.bernard@greenpharma.com

Abstract
In men, the level of testosterone decreases with age. At the skin level, the result is observed as a decrease in density and in a lower elasticity. Identifying compounds that are able to increase the level of testosterone appears to be an attractive strategy to develop new antiaging bioactive ingredients for men. Reverse pharmacognosy was successfully applied to identify new natural compounds able to modulate testosterone levels. Among several in silico hits, honokiol was retained as a candidate as it has the greatest potential to become an active ingredient. This result was then validated in vitro on aromatase and 5-alpha-reductase type 1 and 2, which are two types of enzymes implicated in the degradation of free testosterone. Indeed, honokiol was identified as an inhibitor of aromatase, with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of about 50 μM. In addition, honokiol was shown to be an inhibitor of 5-alpha-reductase type 1, with an IC(50) of about 75 μM. Taken together, these data indicate that honokiol modulates testosterone levels, and its structure has the potential to serve as a lead for future designs of highly selective inhibitors of 5-alpha-reductase type 1.

KEYWORDS:
dermopharmacy, honokiol, man cosmetics, reverse pharmacognosy, testosterone


Perhaps there is a role for honokiol in sunblock products?

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/22890204

Drug Discov Ther. 2012 Jun;6(3):140-6.

Time and dose-response effects of honokiol on UVB-induced skin cancer development.

Guillermo RF, Chilampalli C, Zhang X, Zeman D, Fahmy H, Dwivedi C.

Source
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD 57007, USA.

Abstract

Honokiol has shown chemopreventive effects in chemically-induced and UVB-induced skin cancer in mice. In this investigation, we assessed the time-effects of a topical low dose of honokiol (30 μg), and then the effects of different honokiol doses (30, 45, and 60 μg) on a UVB-induced skin cancer model to find an optimal dose and time for desirable chemopreventive effects. UVB radiation (30 mJ/cm(2), 5 days/week for 25 or 27 weeks) was used to induce skin carcinogenesis in SKH-1 mice. For the time-response experiment 30 μg honokiol in acetone was applied topically to the animals before the UVB exposure (30 min, 1 h, and 2 h) and after the UVB exposure (immediately, 30 min, and 1 h). Control groups were treated with acetone. For the dose-response study, animals were treated topically with acetone or honokiol (30, 45, and 60 μg) one hour before the UVB exposure. In the time-response experiment, honokiol inhibited skin tumor multiplicity by 49-58% while reducing tumor volumes by 70-89%. In the dose-response study, honokiol (30, 45, and 60 μg) significantly decreased skin tumor multiplicity by 36-78% in a dose-dependent manner, while tumor area was reduced by 76-94%. Honokiol (60 μg) significantly reduced tumor incidence by 40% as compared to control group. Honokiol applied in very low doses (30 μg) either before or after UVB radiation shows chemopreventive effects. Honokiol (30, 45, and 60 μg) prevents UVB-induced skin cancer in a dose-dependent manner. Honokiol can be an effective chemopreventive agent against skin cancer.

PMID: 22890204 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] Free full text


Edited by blood, 29 October 2013 - 09:39 AM.


#14 blood

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 09:42 AM

Protective effects against various kinds of stress:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22285174

Urology. 2012 Apr;79(4):967.e5-11. doi: 10.1016/j.urology.2011.11.027. Epub 2012 Jan 27.

Honokiol attenuates torsion/detorsion-induced testicular injury in rat testis by way of suppressing endoplasmic reticulum stress-related apoptosis.

Huang KH, Weng TI, Huang HY, Huang KD, Lin WC, Chen SC, Liu SH.

Source
Institute of Toxicology, National Taiwan University Hospital, and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:
To investigate the protective effect of honokiol, a phytochemical used in traditional medicine, on testicular injury after torsion/detorsion (T/D) in a rat model. Testicular torsion is a medical emergency that can cause impairment of semen quality and permanent testicular atrophy or loss.

METHODS:
Male Wistar rats were randomized to each time point of each group (n = 6/time point/group). After 2 hours of torsion, the testes were counter-rotated to the natural position. The rats in each group underwent a sham operation, T/D, or T/D with honokiol treatment (5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg intraperitoneally, immediately before detorsion). Bilateral orchiectomy was performed at 6 and 24 hours and 3 months after detorsion. The testes were examined histologically. Apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress were detected by Western blot.

RESULTS:
Histologic examination revealed that testicular T/D induced acute injury after 6 and 24 hours, and spermatogenesis was decreased at 3 months of follow-up. At 24 hours after T/D, increases were found in the activation of apoptosis-related molecules [poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and caspases 3 and 7], and the expression levels of endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated molecules (phosphorylated-eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 subunit α and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein). These increases were significantly reversed with honokiol treatment. Furthermore, honokiol effectively reversed the inhibition of spermatogenesis in testes treated with T/D for 3 months.

CONCLUSION:
The results of our study have shown that the endoplasmic reticulum stress-related apoptotic pathway is involved in testicular injury after testicular T/D. It remains to be determined whether alterations in this pathway would have a protective affect against reperfusion damage.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID: 22285174 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22261858

J Nat Med. 2012 Oct;66(4):591-9. doi: 10.1007/s11418-011-0623-x. Epub 2012 Jan 20.

Honokiol suppresses the development of post-ischemic glucose intolerance and neuronal damage in mice.

Harada S, Kishimoto M, Kobayashi M, Nakamoto K, Fujita-Hamabe W, Chen HH, Chan MH, Tokuyama S.

Source
Department of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kobe Gakuin University, Hyogo, Japan.

Abstract

Honokiol, a constituent of Magnolia obovata, has various pharmacological effects, including protection against cerebral ischemia. However, few studies have been conducted to evaluate the possible neuroprotective effects of honokiol against cerebral ischemia. We recently reported that cerebral ischemic neuronal damage could be triggered by glucose intolerance that develops after the onset of ischemic stress (i.e., post-ischemic glucose intolerance). In addition, suppression of post-ischemic glucose intolerance significantly ameliorated ischemic neuronal damage. Here, we investigated the effects of honokiol on the development of post-ischemic glucose intolerance and neuronal damage. Mice were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 2 h. The development of post-ischemic glucose intolerance on day 1 and neuronal damage on day 3 after MCAO were significantly reduced by intraperitoneal administration of honokiol (10 mg/kg) compared with the vehicle-treated group. Honokiol did not affect serum insulin or adiponectin levels. However, honokiol significantly decreased the expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and increased the expression of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) on day 1 after MCAO, compared with the vehicle-treated MCAO group. The results of this study suggest that honokiol could prevent post-ischemic glucose intolerance in an AMPK-dependent manner, which may be involved in the neuroprotective effects of honokiol against cerebral ischemia.

PMID: 22261858 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]



#15 blood

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 09:47 AM

Honokiol for insomnia?

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22537192

Br J Pharmacol. 2012 Oct;167(3):587-98. doi: 10.1111/j.1476-5381.2012.02010.x.

Honokiol promotes non-rapid eye movement sleep via the benzodiazepine site of the GABA(A) receptor in mice.

Qu WM, Yue XF, Sun Y, Fan K, Chen CR, Hou YP, Urade Y, Huang ZL.

Source
Department of Pharmacology, Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University, China. quweimin@fudan.edu.cn

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:
Decoctions of the Chinese herb houpu contain honokiol and are used to treat a variety of mental disorders, including depression. Depression commonly presents alongside sleep disorders and sleep disturbances, which appear to be a major risk factor for depression. Here, we have evaluated the somnogenic effect of honokiol and the mechanisms involved.

EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH:
Honokiol was administered i.p. at 20:00 h in mice. Flumazenil, an antagonist at the benzodiazepine site of the GABA(A) receptor, was administered i.p. 15 min before honokiol. The effects of honokiol were measured by EEG and electromyogram (EMG), c-Fos expression and in vitro electrophysiology.

KEY RESULTS:
Honokiol (10 and 20 mg·kg⁻¹) significantly shortened the sleep latency to non-rapid eye movement (non-REM, NREM) sleep and increased the amount of NREM sleep. Honokiol increased the number of state transitions from wakefulness to NREM sleep and, subsequently, from NREM sleep to wakefulness. However, honokiol had no effect on either the amount of REM sleep or EEG power density of both NREM and REM sleep. Honokiol increased c-Fos expression in ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO) neurons, as examined by immunostaining, and excited sleep-promoting neurons in the VLPO by whole-cell patch clamping in the brain slice. Pretreatment with flumazenil abolished the somnogenic effects and activation of the VLPO neurons by honokiol.

CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS:
Honokiol promoted NREM sleep by modulating the benzodiazepine site of the GABA(A) receptor, suggesting potential applications in the treatment of insomnia, especially for patients who experience difficulty in falling and staying asleep.

© 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.
PMID: 22537192 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] PMCID: PMC3449263 Free PMC Article



#16 sandoz

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 12:34 AM

Ive personally tried magnolol in doses of 25, 50, 75, & 100mg. It never really did much for me. A few times i thought i might be getting some placebo but even that didn't last. After reading through some of the studies I was very anxious to try it. Especially considering its popularity throughout asia. I purchased from a reliable source and measured dosing on a mg scale capable of .0005.

Was hoping for more from this one....

#17 blood

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 08:19 AM

Ive personally tried magnolol in doses of 25, 50, 75, & 100mg. It never really did much for me. A few times i thought i might be getting some placebo but even that didn't last. After reading through some of the studies I was very anxious to try it. Especially considering its popularity throughout asia. I purchased from a reliable source and measured dosing on a mg scale capable of .0005.

Was hoping for more from this one....


According to examine.com, the doses used in rat experiments (on honokiol's antidepressant properties) ranged from 15 to 30 mg/ kg.
http://examine.com/s...ia officinalis/

The human equivalent dose (using a conversion based on body surface area) would be around 2.4 - 4.9 mg/kg.

I've tried higher doses than you (360 mg/ day). I believe I have noticed some beneficial effects (an anti anxiety effect, an antidepressant effect, possibly a mild weight loss effect). I like the effects enough to continue taking it.

I use two of these/ day:
http://www.swansonvi...L117&csp=SWH225

Edited by blood, 03 November 2013 - 09:15 AM.


#18 blood

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 01:07 PM

Honokiol for osteoporosis?

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21887456

Int J Mol Med. 2011 Dec;28(6):1049-53. doi: 10.3892/ijmm.2011.786. Epub 2011 Aug 31.

Honokiol stimulates osteoblastogenesis by suppressing NF-κB activation.

Yamaguchi M, Arbiser JL, Weitzmann MN.

Source
Emory University School of Medicine, 1329 WMRB, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA.

Abstract

Magnolia officinalis, a component of Asian herbal teas, has long been employed in traditional Japanese and Chinese medicine to treat numerous maladies. Honokiol, a biphenolic compound, is now considered to be one of the major active ingredients of Magnolia extract, and is under intense investigation for its anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor and neuroprotective properties. Biochemically, honokiol has been recognized to modulate the nuclear factor κ B (NF-κB) signal transduction pathway suggesting that it possesses anti-inflammatory properties. Inflammation is intimately associated with bone turnover and skeletal deterioration and consequently, anti-inflammatory drugs may hold significant promise as bone protective agents to stem bone loss in osteoporotic conditions. We and others have demonstrated that suppression of NF-κB blunts osteoclastic bone resorption, but promotes osteoblastic bone formation. Indeed previous studies have demonstrated the anti-osteoclastogenic effects of honokiol, however, activities on osteoblast differentiation and activity have yet to be investigated. In this study, we show that honokiol is a potent inducer of in vitro osteoblast differentiation by virtue of its capacity to suppress basal and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)-induced NF-κB activation and to alleviate the suppressive action of TNFα on bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2-induced Smad activation. Our data confirm that honokiol may have considerable promise as a dual anabolic/anti-catabolic agent for the amelioration of multiple osteoporotic diseases.

PMID: 21887456 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]



http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21621646

Int Immunopharmacol. 2011 Oct;11(10):1541-5. doi: 10.1016/j.intimp.2011.05.011. Epub 2011 May 27.

Honokiol isolated from Magnolia officinalis stimulates osteoblast function and inhibits the release of bone-resorbing mediators.

Choi EM.

Source
Department of Food & Nutrition, Education Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 1, Hoegi-dong, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130–701, Korea. cheunmi@hanmail.net

Abstract

There has been a strong interest in searching for natural therapies for osteoporosis. Honokiol is a phenolic compound isolated from the bark of Magnolia officinalis, a plant widely used in traditional medicine. In the present study, the effects of honokiol on the function of osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were studied. Honokiol caused a significant elevation of cell growth, alkaline phosphatase activity, collagen synthesis, mineralization, glutathione content, and osteoprotegerin release in the cells (P<0.05). Moreover, honokiol significantly (P<0.05) decreased the production of osteoclast differentiation inducing factors such as TNF-α, IL-6, and receptor activator of nuclear factor-kB ligand (RANKL) in the presence of antimycin A, which inhibits mitochondrial electron transport and has been used as a ROS generator. These results demonstrate that honokiol may have positive effects on skeletal structure.
Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PMID: 21621646 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]



#19 blood

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 02:30 AM

Ive personally tried magnolol in doses of 25, 50, 75, & 100mg.


Were you taking a purified honokiol extract, or a product containing magnolol and honokiol in some ratio? Can you say what product you were using?

#20 sandoz

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 06:27 AM

Ive personally tried magnolol in doses of 25, 50, 75, & 100mg.


Were you taking a purified honokiol extract, or a product containing magnolol and honokiol in some ratio? Can you say what product you were using?



The Honokiol I assayed was >95%. From a reliable source ( I have 3rd party tested numerous unique compounds order through them ). I also factored in purity, so when I said I took X amount of said compound, I took X amount of a hypothetically pure substance. I had expected more of a narcotic, anxiolytic effect based on Honokiol's, published, biological activity.

#21 blood

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 01:29 PM

I had expected more of a narcotic, anxiolytic effect based on Honokiol's, published, biological activity.


I can't help but wonder if a larger dose might have provided more noticeable effects?

I notice on the website for HonoPure (a 95% honokiol product), recommended doses range from 250 mg to 3 grams. (The larger doses are for people dealing with active cancers.)

#22 blood

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 10:19 AM

Honokiol could, conceivably, be of use in the treatment or perhaps prevention of Alzheimer's:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ptr.3178/abstract

Phytother Res. 2010 Oct;24(10):1538-42. doi: 10.1002/ptr.3178.

Neuroprotective effect of honokiol and magnolol, compounds from Magnolia officinalis, on beta-amyloid-induced toxicity in PC12 cells.

Hoi CP, Ho YP, Baum L, Chow AH.

Source
School of Pharmacy, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong, China.

Abstract

Amyloid β peptide (Aβ) induced toxicity is a well-established pathway of neuronal cell death which might play a role in Alzheimer's disease. In this regard, the toxic effect of Aβ on a cultured Aβ-sensitive neuronal cell line was used as a primary screening tool for potential anti-Alzheimer's therapeutic agents. The effects of nine pure compounds (vitamin E, α-asarone, salidroside, baicolin, magnolol, gastrodin, bilobalide, honokiol and β-asarone) from selected Chinese herbs on neuronal cell death induced by Aβ in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells were examined. Only two of the studied compounds, honokiol and magnolol, significantly decreased Aβ-induced cell death. Further experiments indicated that their neuroprotective effects are possibly mediated through reduced ROS production as well as suppression of intracellular calcium elevation and inhibition of caspase-3 activity. The results provide for the first time a scientific rationale for the clinical use of honokiol and magnolol in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.



#23 Bryan_S

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Posted 14 April 2015 - 06:21 PM

Ancient herbal therapy can prevent—and reverse—cardiac hypertrophy in mice

This is important . . . increasing SIRT3 levels in the mitochondria, Has anyone here verified a pure source of honokiol?

 

http://medicalxpress...rsecardiac.html



#24 malbecman

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Posted 15 April 2015 - 06:42 PM

 Been sorting keeping track of this, it looks pretty interesting & promising.   Here's a good in vivo study from 2013

 

Mol Nutr Food Res. 2013 Nov;57(11):1988-98. doi: 10.1002/mnfr.201300113. Epub 2013 Jul 31.

Long-term supplementation of honokiol and magnolol ameliorates body fat accumulation, insulin resistance, and adipose inflammation in high-fat fed mice.
Abstract
SCOPE: 

This study investigated the effect of honokiol (HON) and magnolol (MAG), phenolic compounds in Magnolia plants, on adiposity and adiposity-related metabolic disturbances in mice fed high-fat diet (HFD), and the potential underlying mechanisms focusing on the lipid metabolism and inflammatory response.

METHOD AND RESULTS: 

C57BL/6J mice were fed HFD (45 kcal% fat) with or without HON (0.02%, w/w) or MAG (0.02%, w/w) for 16 wk. Despite no changes in body weight, food intake, and hepatic fat accumulation, HON and MAG significantly lowered the weight of white adipose tissue (WAT) as well as adipocyte size and protected against insulin resistance induced by HFD. These effects were associated with increases in energy expenditure and adipose fatty acid oxidation and decreases in fatty acid synthase activity and expression of genes related to fatty acid synthesis, desaturation, and uptake, as well as adipocyte differentiation in WAT. Moreover, HON and MAG significantly lowered the expression of proinflammatory genes in WAT and elevated the plasma IL-10 level. Particularly, HON significantly decreased the plasma resistin level and increased the plasma adiponectin level compared to the control group.

CONCLUSION: 

HON and MAG have potential as novel agents for amelioration of adiposity and associated insulin resistance and inflammation.



#25 resveratrol_guy

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Posted 28 August 2015 - 01:00 AM

I can see the case for taking this pair of supplements, but is no one phazed by the GABA connection to benzodiazepines, which have been linked to more aggressive Alzheimer's progression? Granted, it may be that people who take benzos do so because they experience more stress, which is of course bad for the brain; in other words, the relationship may not be causal. So to anyone who has taken this stuff for more than a month: have you noticed anything in this regard?

 

Here's the story at Harvard. "In the study, the greater a person’s cumulative dose of benzodiazepines, the higher his or her risk of Alzheimer’s." It at least sounds causal.

 

And then: "If you have ever taken Valium, Xanax, or some other benzodiazepine to calm your nerves or sleep better, you may have felt woozy or hungover the next day." -- Does this supplement make you feel like that the next morning, if you take it at night?


Edited by resveratrol_guy, 28 August 2015 - 01:14 AM.


#26 stefan_001

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Posted 28 August 2015 - 09:17 AM

I can see the case for taking this pair of supplements, but is no one phazed by the GABA connection to benzodiazepines, which have been linked to more aggressive Alzheimer's progression? Granted, it may be that people who take benzos do so because they experience more stress, which is of course bad for the brain; in other words, the relationship may not be causal. So to anyone who has taken this stuff for more than a month: have you noticed anything in this regard?

 

Here's the story at Harvard. "In the study, the greater a person’s cumulative dose of benzodiazepines, the higher his or her risk of Alzheimer’s." It at least sounds causal.

 

And then: "If you have ever taken Valium, Xanax, or some other benzodiazepine to calm your nerves or sleep better, you may have felt woozy or hungover the next day." -- Does this supplement make you feel like that the next morning, if you take it at night?

 

Could you please explain a bit more about this connection?



#27 resveratrol_guy

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Posted 28 August 2015 - 02:26 PM

 

I can see the case for taking this pair of supplements, but is no one phazed by the GABA connection to benzodiazepines, which have been linked to more aggressive Alzheimer's progression? Granted, it may be that people who take benzos do so because they experience more stress, which is of course bad for the brain; in other words, the relationship may not be causal. So to anyone who has taken this stuff for more than a month: have you noticed anything in this regard?

 

Here's the story at Harvard. "In the study, the greater a person’s cumulative dose of benzodiazepines, the higher his or her risk of Alzheimer’s." It at least sounds causal.

 

And then: "If you have ever taken Valium, Xanax, or some other benzodiazepine to calm your nerves or sleep better, you may have felt woozy or hungover the next day." -- Does this supplement make you feel like that the next morning, if you take it at night?

 

Could you please explain a bit more about this connection?

 

 

Honokiol acts on the same GABA(A) receptors as benzos according to this Wiki article. Likewise for magnolol. Wiki also states: "However, honokiol has been shown to achieve anxiolysis with fewer motor or cognitive side effects than GABAA receptor agonists such as flurazepam and diazepam" as though this is good news. That sounds like "beer won't get you drunk as quickly as vodka". Does that mean beer is a health food? No. This is the problem, then: if I want honokiol's benefits (neurite outgrowth among them, ironically), I need to suffer these unspecified "cognitive side effects". Does that mean Alzheimer's accerlation? Maybe Wiki is just plain wrong, but where's the evidence one way or the other?

 

What's so frustrating is that we don't know if the action of benzos on GABA is actually accelerating dementia, or whether people are taking benzos because they're already experiencing intense stress and anxiety which themselves cause cognitive decline. But honokiol and magnolol are different substances, so in a perfect world we would just look at the longterm cognitive health of people who take them. Does such data exist?

 

It's also interesting that honokiol and magnolol can stimulate neurite outgrwoth at some low doses but the former is neurotoxic at 100 uM or less according to source [38] in this paper. Granted, neither of these "facts" come from human studies, or even studies of human neurons. So the only takeaway is that we're dealing with a double-edged sword. While I think 100 uM would be impossible reach in a single dose, perhaps this stuff could accumulate and cause problems over long periods of use.

 

I don't want to be overly paranoid and dismiss these obviously promising compounds without good reason. But I'd like to see some human cognitive data, or even anecdotes, over several months or years of use.

 

If any of you have been taking this stuff for a long period of time, please tell us about the cognitive changes you've noticed, if any.


Edited by resveratrol_guy, 28 August 2015 - 02:31 PM.

  • Ill informed x 1

#28 Gerrans

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Posted 28 August 2015 - 04:28 PM

In my opinion, the reason drugs work is by tapping into systems that evolved in the human body in synergy with the plant food we eat. So it is no surprise that plant compounds affect brain chemicals. I doubt they have the same downsides as the synthetic drugs that ape some of their effects.


Edited by Gerrans, 28 August 2015 - 04:29 PM.

  • Agree x 1

#29 Bryan_S

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Posted 04 September 2015 - 06:41 PM

Science News
from research organizations

Compound in magnolia may combat head and neck cancers

 

Honokiol, from magnolia bark, shuts down cancer cells in lab

 

Date: June 25, 2015

Source: Veterans Affairs Research Communications

Summary: As one of the compounds in magnolia extract, honokiol has been used for centuries in traditional Chinese and Japanese medicine to treat anxiety and other conditions. More recently, scientists have been revealing its cancer-fighting properties.

http://www.scienceda...50625145320.htm

 

 

This topic has been of special interest to me this year. I'm just taking a modest 400mg/per/day of Magnolia Extract not the pure Honokiol, so as far as a total oral dose what I'm taking is on the low side compared to the studies I'm reading. Still deciding on its overall effectiveness and possible down sides but the research is encouraging suggesting very low toxicity. I take the Swanson brand Magnolia Extract, they claim 90% honokiol. A product called Honopure seems like the highest purified and refined honokiol for the retail market but I'll stick to the cheaper Swanson version. 

 

I'm still evaluating its effectiveness for conditions not associated with cancers because honokiol works along several paths. I started taking honokiol back on May 11, 2015. It attracted my interest as an anti-inflammatory and SIRT 3 activator. I was mainly interested in what synergistic effects it might have with NAD boosting where most of you find my posts. I don't have anything totally conclusive yet but I have noticed changes in my BPH and Cherry Angioma's. (honokiol is a Angiogenesis Inhibitor) These are 2 recently identified areas researchers are examining that I hadn't originally recognized when I started supplementation and I am pleased to find they related to me directly.

 

This 2-thousand year-old folk remedy is now getting the pre-clinical research it deserves and the medical implications are far reaching.


Edited by Bryan_S, 04 September 2015 - 06:46 PM.


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#30 resveratrol_guy

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Posted 04 September 2015 - 07:23 PM

 

Science News
from research organizations

Compound in magnolia may combat head and neck cancers

 

Honokiol, from magnolia bark, shuts down cancer cells in lab

 

Date: June 25, 2015

Source: Veterans Affairs Research Communications

Summary: As one of the compounds in magnolia extract, honokiol has been used for centuries in traditional Chinese and Japanese medicine to treat anxiety and other conditions. More recently, scientists have been revealing its cancer-fighting properties.

http://www.scienceda...50625145320.htm

 

 

This topic has been of special interest to me this year. I'm just taking a modest 400mg/per/day of Magnolia Extract not the pure Honokiol, so as far as a total oral dose what I'm taking is on the low side compared to the studies I'm reading. Still deciding on its overall effectiveness and possible down sides but the research is encouraging suggesting very low toxicity. I take the Swanson brand Magnolia Extract, they claim 90% honokiol. A product called Honopure seems like the highest purified and refined honokiol for the retail market but I'll stick to the cheaper Swanson version. 

 

I'm still evaluating its effectiveness for conditions not associated with cancers because honokiol works along several paths. I started taking honokiol back on May 11, 2015. It attracted my interest as an anti-inflammatory and SIRT 3 activator. I was mainly interested in what synergistic effects it might have with NAD boosting where most of you find my posts. I don't have anything totally conclusive yet but I have noticed changes in my BPH and Cherry Angioma's. (honokiol is a Angiogenesis Inhibitor) These are 2 recently identified areas researchers are examining that I hadn't originally recognized when I started supplementation and I am pleased to find they related to me directly.

 

This 2-thousand year-old folk remedy is now getting the pre-clinical research it deserves and the medical implications are far reaching.

 

 

This is yet another compelling anticancer property of honokiol. Nice find.

 

Personally, I had to stop using LiftMode honokiol/magnolol because it seemed to leave me feeling groggy. (Perhaps that was coincidental, but I'm not sure.) Have you noticed any mental effects from the Swanson stuff? Also, LiftMode smells like antique Japanese lacquered furniture, which I suppose is unsurpring, considering the origin of preindustrial lacquer. Is that how the Swanson stuff smells?
 






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