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Honokiol / magnolol


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#31 Bryan_S

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Posted 04 September 2015 - 08:02 PM

 

 

Science News
from research organizations

Compound in magnolia may combat head and neck cancers

 

Honokiol, from magnolia bark, shuts down cancer cells in lab

 

Date: June 25, 2015

Source: Veterans Affairs Research Communications

Summary: As one of the compounds in magnolia extract, honokiol has been used for centuries in traditional Chinese and Japanese medicine to treat anxiety and other conditions. More recently, scientists have been revealing its cancer-fighting properties.

http://www.scienceda...50625145320.htm

 

 

This topic has been of special interest to me this year. I'm just taking a modest 400mg/per/day of Magnolia Extract not the pure Honokiol, so as far as a total oral dose what I'm taking is on the low side compared to the studies I'm reading. Still deciding on its overall effectiveness and possible down sides but the research is encouraging suggesting very low toxicity. I take the Swanson brand Magnolia Extract, they claim 90% honokiol. A product called Honopure seems like the highest purified and refined honokiol for the retail market but I'll stick to the cheaper Swanson version. 

 

I'm still evaluating its effectiveness for conditions not associated with cancers because honokiol works along several paths. I started taking honokiol back on May 11, 2015. It attracted my interest as an anti-inflammatory and SIRT 3 activator. I was mainly interested in what synergistic effects it might have with NAD boosting where most of you find my posts. I don't have anything totally conclusive yet but I have noticed changes in my BPH and Cherry Angioma's. (honokiol is a Angiogenesis Inhibitor) These are 2 recently identified areas researchers are examining that I hadn't originally recognized when I started supplementation and I am pleased to find they related to me directly.

 

This 2-thousand year-old folk remedy is now getting the pre-clinical research it deserves and the medical implications are far reaching.

 

 

This is yet another compelling anticancer property of honokiol. Nice find.

 

Personally, I had to stop using LiftMode honokiol/magnolol because it seemed to leave me feeling groggy. (Perhaps that was coincidental, but I'm not sure.) Have you noticed any mental effects from the Swanson stuff? Also, LiftMode smells like antique Japanese lacquered furniture, which I suppose is unsurpring, considering the origin of preindustrial lacquer. Is that how the Swanson stuff smells?
 

 

 

The LiftMode honokiol/magnolol is powdered and I considered this but the Swanson product claimed 90% Honokiol and its already broken down into 200mg capsules so the dosing seemed more consistent. I started with 1 capsule per/day for 2 months and now take 2 so my 400mg is recent but I don't feel groggy since I increased the dosage.

 

The LiftMode honokiol/magnolol as a powder source and it looked harder to know how much you were taking on a couple of fronts. I expect its possible it made you feel groggy, the Swanson product hasn't made me feel this way. I expect this could be dose and purity related. (65%+ Honokiol, 25%+ Magnolol, 95%+ Pure Total LignansMagnolol and Honokiol are both active compounds but I haven't deeply researched Magnolol yet and it appears the Magnolol content is a bit higher than the Swanson product.

 

How much do you suppose you were taking and for how long did you take it?



#32 resveratrol_guy

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Posted 04 September 2015 - 09:17 PM

 

 

 

Science News
from research organizations

Compound in magnolia may combat head and neck cancers

 

Honokiol, from magnolia bark, shuts down cancer cells in lab

 

Date: June 25, 2015

Source: Veterans Affairs Research Communications

Summary: As one of the compounds in magnolia extract, honokiol has been used for centuries in traditional Chinese and Japanese medicine to treat anxiety and other conditions. More recently, scientists have been revealing its cancer-fighting properties.

http://www.scienceda...50625145320.htm

 

 

This topic has been of special interest to me this year. I'm just taking a modest 400mg/per/day of Magnolia Extract not the pure Honokiol, so as far as a total oral dose what I'm taking is on the low side compared to the studies I'm reading. Still deciding on its overall effectiveness and possible down sides but the research is encouraging suggesting very low toxicity. I take the Swanson brand Magnolia Extract, they claim 90% honokiol. A product called Honopure seems like the highest purified and refined honokiol for the retail market but I'll stick to the cheaper Swanson version. 

 

I'm still evaluating its effectiveness for conditions not associated with cancers because honokiol works along several paths. I started taking honokiol back on May 11, 2015. It attracted my interest as an anti-inflammatory and SIRT 3 activator. I was mainly interested in what synergistic effects it might have with NAD boosting where most of you find my posts. I don't have anything totally conclusive yet but I have noticed changes in my BPH and Cherry Angioma's. (honokiol is a Angiogenesis Inhibitor) These are 2 recently identified areas researchers are examining that I hadn't originally recognized when I started supplementation and I am pleased to find they related to me directly.

 

This 2-thousand year-old folk remedy is now getting the pre-clinical research it deserves and the medical implications are far reaching.

 

 

This is yet another compelling anticancer property of honokiol. Nice find.

 

Personally, I had to stop using LiftMode honokiol/magnolol because it seemed to leave me feeling groggy. (Perhaps that was coincidental, but I'm not sure.) Have you noticed any mental effects from the Swanson stuff? Also, LiftMode smells like antique Japanese lacquered furniture, which I suppose is unsurpring, considering the origin of preindustrial lacquer. Is that how the Swanson stuff smells?
 

 

 

The LiftMode honokiol/magnolol is powdered and I considered this but the Swanson product claimed 90% Honokiol and its already broken down into 200mg capsules so the dosing seemed more consistent. I started with 1 capsule per/day for 2 months and now take 2 so my 400mg is recent but I don't feel groggy since I increased the dosage.

 

The LiftMode honokiol/magnolol as a powder source and it looked harder to know how much you were taking on a couple of fronts. I expect its possible it made you feel groggy, the Swanson product hasn't made me feel this way. I expect this could be dose and purity related. (65%+ Honokiol, 25%+ Magnolol, 95%+ Pure Total LignansMagnolol and Honokiol are both active compounds but I haven't deeply researched Magnolol yet and it appears the Magnolol content is a bit higher than the Swanson product.

 

How much do you suppose you were taking and for how long did you take it?

 

 

I was taking roughly 300 mg/d of the LiftMode powder. It seems to be repackaged from Changsha, which is a major Chinese extract producer. But if you haven't noticed a negative mental impact, then maybe this is a product quality issue, or an extended side effect of last week's minor head injury. You certainly seem to be at the top of your game mentally, so I will give the Swanson a try and report back if I notice anything different.

 


 



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#33 Bryan_S

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Posted 20 September 2015 - 07:12 PM

Treating Cancer with Honokiol

 

Published on Apr 13, 2012

http://www.ihealthtube.com Dr. Isaac Eliaz talks about honokiol's properties as a cancer treatment and adjunct to other treatments.

 

I'm trying to get a sense of his credibility. He talks about this as an adjunct to other cancer therapies. He also talks about Honokiol safety in multi gram dosages near the end of the video @ around 7:26.

 



#34 resveratrol_guy

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Posted 25 September 2015 - 03:33 PM

I've been following Bryan_S's research into all this, so before I forget, I have a few quick notes:

 

1. I love this metastudy and in particular this diagram which illuminates the various pathways involved in the neuroprotective properties of honokiol.

 

2. Apart from ecoNugenics Honopure, which I haven't researched, Swanson's offers Magnolia Extract 90% Honokiol, which should not be confused with its Magnolia Bark. (Oops!)

 

3. GABA(A) actually has many subdomains, which may bind in different ways, if at all, with various inhibitors. This adds some weight to the hypothesis that honokiol is not neurotoxic in the same manner as benzos might be, despite the fact that they both target this receptor. (And as I've said before, I also have doubts as to whether benzos are neurotoxic at all, or rather merely statistically associated with stressed out individuals at higher risk of dementia.) From the sound of it, honokiol would be something to administer immediately following ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, or acute neurointoxication except in the case of hemmoragic stroke, on account of its anticoagulative activity. But I'm not sure of the dose, and very high doses are known to be neurotoxic according to the paper linked above.

 


Edited by resveratrol_guy, 25 September 2015 - 03:40 PM.

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#35 resveratrol_guy

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Posted 26 September 2015 - 03:51 PM

It dawned on me that if in fact benzos cause accelerated dementia, the mechanism might simply be what they (and honokiol and magnolol) do best: inhibit obsessive thoughts. Think about it: the easiest way to remember something is to obsess about it all day long. On functional MRI (fMRI), obsession tends to visualize like a precursor to seizure: we see a small hyperintense island of metabolic activity in a sea of baseline activity. I suspect that the ability of these compounds to avert seizure relates to their ability to dissipate these islands of hyperintensity. By the way, drug addiction visualizes in a similar manner, so I wouldn't be surprised if these substances could be of assistance in such cases.

 

Granted, it's desirable to stop obsessing about unproductive thoughts or problems beyond our control. But GABA(A) is a big hammer; inhibiting it should be expected to downregulate all manifestations of obsession. So if there's a safe way to take this stuff, it probably involves consciously overriding the effects when obsession is required for learning. We would need to be more rigorous in our attemps to learn new material, forcing ourselves to obsess about critical details which want to memorize. There is probably a role for mobile technology here, in that we could program it to annoy us all day long about those details.

 

What do you think?

 


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#36 ceridwen

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Posted 26 September 2015 - 04:58 PM

I really don't trust it I stopped taking it when I found it was similar to benzodiazepines. Do you have any opinions on Benegene is that similar to them too?

#37 Bryan_S

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Posted 27 September 2015 - 03:59 PM

Let's look at this objectively. Nicotinamide of which I take in addition to my Nicotinamide Riboside has also been found to be similar to benzodiazepines. "Niacinamide has also been found to stimulate GABA receptors, without binding to the receptor sites, thus creating a benzodiazepine-like effect." So lets not overanalyze what at the moment is a sketchy GABA association because if we include Honokiol than we need to include substances like Nicotinamide. The association is just to flimsy to me.


Edited by Bryan_S, 27 September 2015 - 04:19 PM.

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#38 stefan_001

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Posted 27 September 2015 - 04:56 PM

Let's look at this objectively. Nicotinamide of which I take in addition to my Nicotinamide Riboside has also been found to be similar to benzodiazepines. "Niacinamide has also been found to stimulate GABA receptors, without binding to the receptor sites, thus creating a benzodiazepine-like effect." So lets not overanalyze what at the moment is a sketchy GABA association because if we include Honokiol than we need to include substances like Nicotinamide. The association is just to flimsy to me.

 

I have now taken Swanson Magnolia extract for about a week and a half, one cap of 200mg / day in the evening. So far I have not found any negative impact, wake up fine. Not sure of positive impact either yet. Just for testing I will take two caps tonight to see do I still wake up fresh.


Edited by stefan_001, 27 September 2015 - 04:57 PM.


#39 Gerrans

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Posted 28 September 2015 - 04:00 PM

It dawned on me that if in fact benzos cause accelerated dementia, the mechanism might simply be what they (and honokiol and magnolol) do best: inhibit obsessive thoughts. Think about it: the easiest way to remember something is to obsess about it all day long.

 

On the other hand, one thing I have noticed in certain forms of dementia is a tendency to repeat the same pieces of information, and this can come over as obsession. Though it could be that loss of short-term memory means is this just another form of forgetfulness, so you forget you already said the thing (meaning it is not an obsession).

 

I may be naive, but I find it hard to believe that something like magnolia extract, which has been used for centuries in Chinese medicine, could interfere with receptors in a way that produced permanent damage.
 


Edited by Gerrans, 28 September 2015 - 04:01 PM.


#40 stefan_001

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Posted 28 September 2015 - 04:45 PM

Let's look at this objectively. Nicotinamide of which I take in addition to my Nicotinamide Riboside has also been found to be similar to benzodiazepines. "Niacinamide has also been found to stimulate GABA receptors, without binding to the receptor sites, thus creating a benzodiazepine-like effect." So lets not overanalyze what at the moment is a sketchy GABA association because if we include Honokiol than we need to include substances like Nicotinamide. The association is just to flimsy to me.


I have now taken Swanson Magnolia extract for about a week and a half, one cap of 200mg / day in the evening. So far I have not found any negative impact, wake up fine. Not sure of positive impact either yet. Just for testing I will take two caps tonight to see do I still wake up fresh.

At least no difference when I woke this morning, so no grogginess that was reported earlier...But a one time dose hardly even qualifies as test ofcourse.

#41 hamishm00

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Posted 29 September 2015 - 07:11 AM

800mg honokiol at night recently completely blasted me (the "hit by a truck" feeling) the next morning, then gave me insomnia the next night (I hardly ever get insomnia). I realise it was a heavy dose. I won't be doing that again.

 

 


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#42 Bryan_S

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Posted 29 September 2015 - 04:37 PM

I started taking Honokiol Monday, May 11, 2015 or 141 days ago. I take 400 mg per day, 200 mg in the morning and 200 mg before bed. I really haven't felt much of anything I can attribute directly to the Honokiol. I'm already taking Nicotinamide and Nicotinamide Riboside so it hard to gauge the effect because Nicotinamide has already been associated with GABA benzodiazepine-like actions. So seeing as I haven't felt anything yet maybe the GABA effect with Honokiol is dose dependent or its just being masked from my B3 consumption. On a different note I've posted some observations on the BPH thread of what I think are Honokiol related benefits.

 

 

I take the Swanson brand.

 

swanson-superior-herbs-magnolia-extract-


Edited by Bryan_S, 29 September 2015 - 05:10 PM.

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#43 timbur

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Posted 02 October 2015 - 09:02 PM

Bryan, in the BPH thread you state that you take NR sublingually.  Do you take the Honokiol sublingually too?  I'm taking a powdered form (LiftMode).  The stuff is too dry and bad-tasting for me unless I immediately down it with water.  I wonder whether the capsule form would be easier.  Perhaps it just takes getting used to it.

 



#44 Bryan_S

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Posted 03 October 2015 - 06:06 PM

Do you take the Honokiol sublingually too?

 

Not in this particular instance, I swallow the 200 mg capsules. With the HPN NR they use a vegetable cellulose excipient and I feel safe if accidentally inhaled that but not with the Magnolia Extract. So I'd check the ingredients of anything you plan on taking sublingually. For instance I tried the LCR Niagen last year and thought I'd cough up a lung. Then after a few heated emails I learned they were using a silica dust excipient (Silicon dioxide) in the encapsulation process.

 

 The ‘Other Ingredients’ – What You Need to Know About Excipients in Supplements



#45 Bryan_S

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Posted 09 October 2015 - 05:24 AM

Why elephants rarely get cancer: Potential mechanism identified that may be key to cancer resistance http://medicalxpress.com/news/2015-10-elephants-rarely-cancer-potential-mechanism.html
 
Has anyone else noticed a correlation here? I was reading this article above over coffee this morning and all thru the day I thought to myself haven't I been reading about this P53 connected to honokiol for the last several months? So when I got home tonight I ran the search terms "Honokiol P53"
 
Then the results started returning. "p53 modulates honokiol-induced apoptosis" Its getting late and my brain is tiered but you guys check it out. It appears even though our human genome doesn't make as much P53 as some animals we still have the capacity to make more to reduce caner risk.  I'm sure after reading these you'll be asking the same questions as I am right now.

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#46 stefan_001

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Posted 09 October 2015 - 07:51 PM

Why elephants rarely get cancer: Potential mechanism identified that may be key to cancer resistance http://medicalxpress.com/news/2015-10-elephants-rarely-cancer-potential-mechanism.html

 
Has anyone else noticed a correlation here? I was reading this article above over coffee this morning and all thru the day I thought to myself haven't I been reading about this P53 connected to honokiol for the last several months? So when I got home tonight I ran the search terms "Honokiol P53"
 
Then the results started returning. "p53 modulates honokiol-induced apoptosis" Its getting late and my brain is tiered but you guys check it out. It appears even though our human genome doesn't make as much P53 as some animals we still have the capacity to make more to reduce caner risk.  I'm sure after reading these you'll be asking the same questions as I am right now.

 

 

That is an interesting research report you posted and the connection you made. It such a shame that we dont have the diagnostics gear that would help us monitor levels of proteins in the blood, that would make experimenting with activators so much easier. Time to try to read some of those google results.
 



#47 resveratrol_guy

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Posted 23 October 2015 - 08:07 PM

This might shed some light on the pivotal question of whether or not honokiol suffers from the potential prodementia aspects of benzodiazepines -- and why.

 

"However, long-term benzodiazepines use will cause tolerance, dependence, less-attention and memory impairment problems... Diazepam [a benzodiazepine] (0.5–2 mg/kg, p.o.) dose-dependently prolonged hexobarbital-induced sleeping, disrupted learning and memory. In contrast with diazepam, honokiol (0.2–20 mg/kg, p.o.) had no such unwanted effects besides anti-anxiety." according to this 2011 study from Taiwan (hence the grammatical problems). The authors provide citations to other literature, which is worth some further digging. The difference may come down to GAD65, which is targetted by honokiol but not diazepam (see Figure 3).

 

 


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#48 resveratrol_guy

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Posted 28 October 2015 - 04:57 AM

Well, what do you know. My age spot disappeared. I documented the whole thing photographically on this page (scroll down to see the various photos). While my prime suspect is ashitaba chalcone, I can't help but think that my concurrent sporadic honokiol dosing had something to do with it, particularly in light of anecdotes I've heard. Granted, there's a lot I'm doing healthwise, but I think the majority of the effect is due to the minority of supplements.


Edited by resveratrol_guy, 28 October 2015 - 04:59 AM.

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#49 resveratrol_guy

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Posted 07 November 2015 - 06:45 PM

So just on a whim, I tried Honopure 98% honokiol (250 mg/pill) instead of Swanson 90% honokiol (200 mg/pill). I took it fully expecting to feel sleepy an hour or so later, as with the Swanson stuff. It didn't happen at all. I only realized, hours later, that I was awake and felt normal. So I thought that perhaps Honopure was fake. But when I sprinkled some on my tongue, I could clearly taste the "antique Japanese laquered furniture" flavor that I've mention before. (Again, I suspect it has something to do with the old methods of extracting lacquer from tree bark, not unlike the honokiol that comes from magnolia bark. And no, I've never eaten Japanese furniture. But the odor is burned into my memory because my father used to collect it in our home.)

 

All this is to say, I really wonder whether the drowsiness comes exclusively from the magnolol. Or maybe it was just a fluke. Anyway, I'm posting this in case one of you had the same experience.


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#50 ceridwen

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Posted 07 November 2015 - 07:12 PM

My honopure says a serving size is 1g.Why are you taking such a small dose? Would it be better to take more? Would it be ok for me to take it or any other pro oxidant?

#51 resveratrol_guy

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Posted 07 November 2015 - 09:59 PM

That's odd. I just checked again. My Honopure says that a serving is 2 capsules at 250 mg each, for a total of 500 mg. It's 98% honokiol from magnolia bark. (I really wonder how they isolate honokiol from magnolol, as they're structurally similar, so take this with a grain of salt.)

 

I don't personally consider 250 mg to be a small dose, in light of the significant fatigue that the Swanson stuff caused. But admittedly, for the purpose of combatting existing malignant tumors, it's an order of magnitude too small.

 

I guess I'm just being very careful because of the prodementia effects of benzos; I'm mostly convinced that this is a nonissue, but I want to treat carefully and monitor my mental performance until I'm more confident. Certainly, better sleep would be conducive to better brain health, but constant fatigue would not. But maybe fatigue isn't an issue with Honopure. I'm not completely sure yet.

 

It might well be better to take more, provided the benzo theory is wrong. In particular, I would expect that honokiol would enhance neurite outgrowth more with a higher dose.

 

BTW I think honokiol is an antioxidant, not a prooxidant; you can sort of tell this from the name, as "-ol" suggests the presence of electron-sparing OH groups. I'm not sure about combining it with the latter.

 



#52 ceridwen

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Posted 07 November 2015 - 11:15 PM

The video above says it is an oxidant
but I'm concerned about its similarity to benzodiazepines too

#53 Bryan_S

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Posted 08 November 2015 - 10:49 PM

No connection to benzodiazepines has been found but it does interact at some level with the GABA receptors but not like a benzo. I find this whole topic on honokiol extremely interesting and have been taking 400mg per day. I especially like how it seems to step up the cells error checking and apoptosis. http://www.biomedcen...2407-11-456.pdf

.


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#54 resveratrol_guy

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Posted 09 November 2015 - 04:34 AM

Bryan, have you experienced fatigue a few hours after dosing the 90% Swanson stuff, on a consistent basis? I suppose it's possible to be more tired, yet on the whole, to have improved brain function.



#55 Bryan_S

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Posted 09 November 2015 - 04:52 AM

Bryan, have you experienced fatigue a few hours after dosing the 90% Swanson stuff, on a consistent basis? I suppose it's possible to be more tired, yet on the whole, to have improved brain function.

 

no i haven't



#56 Bryan_S

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Posted 10 November 2015 - 10:41 PM

Honokiol for the Treatment of Neonatal Pain and Prevention of Consequent Neurobehavioral Disorders

http://pubs.acs.org/...natprod.5b00225

 

This study examined the short- and long-term neuroprotective and analgesic activity of honokiol (a naturally occurring lignan isolated from Magnolia) on developing brains in neonates exposed to inflammatory pain, known to cause neuronal cell death. Postnatal day 4 (P4) neonatal rat pups were subjected to intraplantar formalin injection to four paws as a model of severe neonatal pain. Intraperitoneal honokiol (10 mg/kg) or corn oil vehicle control was administered 1 h prior to formalin insult, and animals were maintained on honokiol through postnatal day 21 (P21). Behavioral tests for stress and pain were performed after the painful insult, followed by morphological examinations of the brain sections at P7 and P21. Honokiol significantly attenuated acute pain responses 30 min following formalin insult and decreased chronic thermal hyperalgesia later in life. Honokiol-treated rats performed better on tests of exploratory behavior and performed significantly better in tests of memory. Honokiol treatment normalized hippocampal and thalamic c-Fos and hippocampal alveus substance P receptor expression relative to controls at P21. Together, these findings support that (1) neonatal pain experiences predispose rats to the development of chronic behavioral changes and (2) honokiol prevents and reduces both acute and chronic pathological pain-induced deteriorations in neonatal rats.


Edited by Bryan_S, 10 November 2015 - 10:43 PM.


#57 Bryan_S

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Posted 10 November 2015 - 10:55 PM

Honokiol inhibits bladder tumor growth by suppressing EZH2/miR-143 axis

Received: March 22, 2015 Accepted: September 26, 2015 Published: October 15, 2015

 

http://www.impactjou...35&path[]=15210

 

The oncoprotein EZH2, as a histone H3K27 methyltransferase, is frequently overexpressed in various cancer types. However, the mechanisms underlying its role in urinary bladder cancer (UBC) cells have not yet fully understood. Herein, we reported that honokiol, a biologically active biphenolic compound isolated from the Magnolia officinalis inhibited human UBC cell proliferation, survival, cancer stemness, migration, and invasion, through downregulation of EZH2 expression level, along with the reductions of MMP9, CD44, Sox2 and the induction of tumor suppressor miR-143. Either EZH2 overexpression or miR-143 inhibition could partially reverse honokiol-induced cell growth arrest and impaired clonogenicity. Importantly, it was first revealed that EZH2 could directly bind to the transcriptional regulatory region of miR-143 and repress its expression. Furthermore, honokiol treatment on T24 tumor xenografts confirmed its anticancer effects in vivo, including suppression tumor growth and tumor stemness, accompanied by the dysregulation of EZH2 and miR- 143 expressions. Our data suggest a promising therapeutic option to develop drugs targeting EZH2/miR-143 axis, such as honokiol, for bladder cancer treatment.



#58 Bryan_S

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Posted 10 November 2015 - 11:01 PM

Honokiol inhibits melanoma stem cells by targeting notch signaling

http://onlinelibrary....22242/abstract

 

 

Keywords:
Cancer stem cells;autophagy;cell cycle arrest;Notch-1;Notch-2
Melanoma is an aggressive disease with limited therapeutic options. Here, we determined the effects of honokiol (HNK), a biphenolic natural compound on melanoma cells and stemness. HNK significantly inhibited melanoma cell proliferation, viability, clonogenicity and induced autophagy. In addition, HNK significantly inhibited melanosphere formation in a dose dependent manner. Western blot analyses also demonstrated reduction in stem cell markers CD271, CD166, Jarid1b, and ABCB5. We next examined the effect of HNK on Notch signaling, a pathway involved in stem cell self-renewal. Four different Notch receptors exist in cells, which when cleaved by a series of enzymatic reactions catalyzed by Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-Converting Enzyme (TACE) and γ-secretase protein complex, results in the release of the Notch intracellular domain (NICD), which then translocates to the nucleus and induces target gene expression. Western blot analyses demonstrated that in HNK treated cells there is a significant reduction in the expression of cleaved Notch-2. In addition, there was a reduction in the expression of downstream target proteins, Hes-1 and cyclin D1. Moreover, HNK treatment suppressed the expression of TACE and γ-secretase complex proteins in melanoma cells. To confirm that suppression of Notch-2 activation is critical for HNK activity, we overexpressed NICD1, NICD2, and performed HNK treatment. NICD2, but not NICD1, partially restored the expression of Hes-1 and cyclin D1, and increased melanosphere formation. Taken together, these data suggest that HNK is a potent inhibitor of melanoma cells, in part, through the targeting of melanoma stem cells by suppressing Notch-2 signaling. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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#59 Bryan_S

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Posted 10 November 2015 - 11:06 PM

Genotoxicity and Cytotoxicity Evaluation of the Neolignan Analogue 2-(4-Nitrophenoxy)-1Phenylethanone and its Protective Effect Against DNA Damage

http://journals.plos...al.pone.0142284

Discussion

Genotoxicity tests are of fundamental importance for drug development, since genotoxic compounds can cause mutation and chromosomal damage events that are essential to initiate carcinogenesis [27]. The pharmacological and toxicological activities of the neolignan analogue 4NF have not been studied yet. In our study, this compound showed no significant genotoxic activity in mice at the doses tested assessed by the micronucleus test in bone marrow as well as by the comet assay in peripheral blood leukocytes.

Studies with neolignans extracted from plants also showed no genotoxic effects induced by these compounds. The possible genotoxic effects of a plant extract containing 94% of magnolol neolignan and 1.5% of honokiol neolignan were investigated. The authors concluded that the standardized extract showed no mutagenic activity using the Ames mutagenicity test and did not induce micronucleus formation in immature erythrocytes of Swiss albino mice [28].



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#60 Bryan_S

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Posted 17 November 2015 - 02:11 AM

Honokiol inhibits bladder tumor growth by suppressing EZH2/ miR-143 axis

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/26484567

 

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