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Supplements to keep skin looking young


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#211 aconita

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 10:08 PM

I can't really find any hydrolyzed collagen in the U.S. that is at and around 2000 kDa. Great Lakes says theirs is 2000 to 5000 kDa. Sports Research says about the same for theirs. I think BulkSupplements claimed 1000.  I've been getting Great Lakes. btw I can tell the glycine in that works as far as sleep quality goes.

 

I did post in several occasions on this forums about collagen, my posts were always based on the conclusions of my researches about the topic leaded to.

 

As you may notice in my last post I included a citation from examine.com about collagen and its link (.https://examine.com/...pe-ii-collagen/ ), I invite whom is interested in collagens to read what examine.com says about, there are relatively new studies on the subject that seems to change what previously thought.

 

Surprisingly enough collagen, and hyaluronic acid as well, are known from quite a long time but not well researched at all, only very recently researchers started focusing more in dept on those and their mechanisms, it is a quite new field still in its infancy, I would say. 

 

I am not going here to write about what emerges since examine and other papers do explain it much better than I possibly could.

 

Worth reading is the Biocell patent too, I know...patents are a pain in the neck...but this one is well wort the effort because it is quite informative about collagens and their behaviors according to latest researches (or so):

 

http://www.freepaten...om/8563045.html

 

By the way to give a try at Biocell collagen isn't going to break any bank account and may be interesting:

 

https://www.vitamins...ie-caps/vs-2519

 

Undenatured CII (UC-II®) is worth a try too, Nowfoods carries it, for example.

 

I would definitely drop hydrolized collagen (type 1 and 3) in favor of the above (collagen type 2) to see if practice confirms the research, which according to reviews on Amazon seems to be the case.



#212 Oakman

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Posted 19 April 2017 - 01:47 AM

I'd give Collagen Type 2 a definite maybe. I've been taking Doctor's Best Best Hyaluronic Acid with Chondroitin Sulfate, 2-4 cups a day (2 caps are recommended) that has the same BioCell formula (there are several other brands that are the same). Quite inexpensive, and I'd say after two bottles, my skin tone and smoothness is better than before. I do use other skin products as well, so I can't say it to be the reason absolutely, but...

 

Interestingly, I had just decided to try, and so purchased another brand, and of course it has only BioActive NeoCell Collagen type 1 & 3, so I guess I'll be able to do a comparison between competing types.

 

Now that I'm paying more attention, it looks like these are two unique types of collagen, with different target outcomes.

 

​ - Our Super CollagenTM line uses BioActive NeoCell CollagenTM Type 1&3. Collagen Type 1&3 is 90% of the body’s Collagen and is the main Collagen constituents in the skin, hair, nails, ligaments, tendons, bones and muscles. Super CollagenTM products provide a pure and potent dose of clinically tested, enzymatically hydrolyzed collagen.*

 

 - Collagen Type 2 makes up 60% of cartilage tissue and is crucial for healthy and fluid joint movement. NeoCell’s Collagen2 is a naturally complete joint supplement that contains glucosamine, chondroitin and hyaluronic acid, which are key components for supporting and maintaining healthy joint function.*


Edited by Oakman, 19 April 2017 - 02:09 AM.


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#213 Artificiality

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Posted 19 April 2017 - 03:41 AM

I've been taking collagen the last few months, and I have to say I see a marked improvement on my skin. My skin was starting to get some smaller looking wrinkles and some small indents/enlarged pores, all of which are pretty much gone since taking collagen. I also use my hands a lot for my work, and as such tend to wash them more than I should, leaving them dry and rough looking by the end of the week. However I've noticed that my moisture retention has improved substantially, to the point where I haven't had to use any hand moisturizer at all since starting collagen supplementation.



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#214 aconita

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Posted 19 April 2017 - 03:44 AM

Don't do the mistake of jumping to what seems logical conclusions, it is true that collagen 1 and 3 are in skin while collagen 3 is in the cartilage but it doesn't mean 1 and 3 will make your skin better looking leaving joints cartilages alone or that 2 will do good on your joints without improving your skin, it just doesn't work that way.

 

What it seems emerging from research is that collagen 2 in different forms (Biocell and Undenatured CII (UC-II®)) just works better in all directions.

 

Yes, Biocell collagen is sold under many different brands, some adds other substances to it, others don't, some are 500mg capsules, other are 1000mg, but in all cases if it does contain Biocell it is clearly stated on the bottle.

 

Not that Biocell necessarily is the last word for that kind of collagen, it is just that it seems supported by quite a few studies and price seems affordable anyway, therefore worth a try, just in case.

 

By the way it isn't that Biocell is collagen with added chondroitin and hyaluronic acid in a specific ratio, it is that collagen 2 contains chondroitin and ha and Biocell hydrolizes it in a way to guarantee a specific ratio and molecular weight which seems yielding good clinical results.

 

Reading the Biocell patent clarifies those points quite exhaustively.


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#215 Adaptogen

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 07:39 AM

Aconita, do you know if vitamin C needs to be taken at the same time as collagen/gelatin supplements for optimal collagen synthesis, or as long ones daily C intake is adequate then collagen synthesis will likely be the same?


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#216 aconita

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 07:54 AM

I suppose it doesn't matter much but since vitamin C is hydro soluble, therefore quite short lasting, taking it at the same time could be a good idea, just in case.


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#217 ZuoCi

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Posted 03 May 2017 - 06:54 PM

 

Ceramides are worth considering, topically and orally.


Ceramides did nothing for me, I think they are only useful for the 70+ user who does not have as much ceramides left.

 

I think this is probably true. I was using CeraVe's moisturizer while I was on Retin-A, because it dries my skin out badly in winter. Ceramides help a lot with Retin-A dryness. It did nothing for skin aside from keep it from drying out with fewer applications. But when I was researching ceramides, I saw many, many testimonials from people over 60 saying it did amazing things for them. 

 

Not sure why pycnogenol(pine bark extract) keeps being brought up. The results from studies are pretty "meh"

 

Pine bark extract was also associated with a 3% reduction in skin wrinkles, according to researchers from Leibniz Research Institute for Environmental Medicine (IUF). Skin hydrations increased by 8%.

 

The same person discovered the use of both pine bark extract, and grape seed. He seemed to strongly favor grape seed extract.

 

 

Professor Jacques Masquelier of the University of Bordeaux, France, discovered OPCs from the bark of French maritime pine, and later from grape seeds, patenting both extraction processes in 1951 and 1970 respectively.  He named OPCs pycnogenol, but this term is no longer used in the scientific community and it now represents the trade name for an OPC extract from the French maritime pine.  In his studies, he found that the extract from grape seeds exhibited substantially more anti-oxidant potential than pine bark extracts, and for this reason and ease of extraction process, he favored GSE.  Research has validated this observation, identifying the presence of the highly potent anti-oxidant gallic esters of procyanidins in GSE but not in pine bark extract.  It should be noted that pine bark extracts contain a total of 80%-85% OPCs and grape seed extracts contain 90-95%.

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#218 Adamzski

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Posted 04 May 2017 - 07:23 AM

Ceramides are big in Korea, there are tons of products named Cerasomething.

 

I got some of this 

California Gold Nutrition, CollagenUP™ 5000, Marine-Sourced Collagen Peptides + Hyaluronic Acid & Vitamin C, 

https://www.iherb.co...-oz-204-g/64903

From iherb

 

Claims to have no fishy smell or taste but it is exactly the opposite. I mix it with sugary convenience store aloevera juice, have taken the 5g scoop daily for the last 3 days.

 

How does this product seem? It does not smell or taste that bad when mixed with a lot of juice, seems to have lost its smell a little today.

 

I have attached a report on the metals in it, bad?

 

Would I be better off with a different Collagen supplement?

 

Attached Files


Edited by Adamzski, 04 May 2017 - 07:38 AM.


#219 rubegoldberg

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 12:51 AM

https://examine.com/...ium-leucotomos/

<

studies on Polypodium Leucotomos do note that it appears to have a variety of protective effects against UV(B) induced skin cell radiation, which confers protective effects agains the sun despite absorbing the radiation.

 

The benefits, mechanistically, are part anti-oxidant and part anti-inflammatory but may be highly related to an induction of p53; a protein that is sometimes known as anti-tumor, but also appears to suppress inflammation while protecting the genome (DNA) from damage.

 

Human interventions note that it seems to beneficially influence most skin conditions, with fairly reliable suppression of erythema (reddening of the skin in response to UV radiation) and can help with persons who are hypersensitive to sunlight and suffer from "polymorphic light eruptions", a delayed onset itchiness and reddening...

 

>


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#220 Adamzski

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 01:44 PM

So far feel this CollagenUP is providing benefits, I have been living my same lack of sleep with a non lack of cigs and alcohol lifestyle but can see a difference in the plumping of my face, will continue it.



#221 floweryriddle

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Posted 03 June 2017 - 04:03 AM

I'm a man in my mid 20s and started seeing first little wrinkles especially around the eye area and would like to fight this.

Reading this post, Retin-A seems very promising. I'm currently using a eye cream to battle dark circles. Works very slow but seems to improve things.

Questions:
- where do you all get your Retin-A from?
- What percentage should I be looking at?
- Is if safe to apply around eye area?
- Can I use it with regular moisturizer? Before or after the Retin-A?

I'll also look into collagen and HA. Anything else you would recommend? I want to start as early as possible taking care of my skin.

I also have a few acne scars and wanted to go on lasering them later this year with a fractural treatment.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Edited by dvstr, 03 June 2017 - 04:03 AM.


#222 Gayle63

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Posted 03 June 2017 - 02:54 PM

I'm a man in my mid 20s and started seeing first little wrinkles especially around the eye area and would like to fight this.

Reading this post, Retin-A seems very promising. I'm currently using a eye cream to battle dark circles. Works very slow but seems to improve things.

Questions:
- where do you all get your Retin-A from?
- What percentage should I be looking at?
- Is if safe to apply around eye area?
- Can I use it with regular moisturizer? Before or after the Retin-A?

I'll also look into collagen and HA. Anything else you would recommend? I want to start as early as possible taking care of my skin.

I also have a few acne scars and wanted to go on lasering them later this year with a fractural treatment.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Hi there! I'm a long-time Retin-A user, so I can tell you about that. I get mine from the dermatologist. If you can find a nice dermatologist who will prescribe it, then your insurance will cover it. Otherwise, prescription-strength Retin-A will run you about $100 a month, I think, depending on how long you can make that tube last (so as little as $40-50 a month if you stretch it. One tube of 0.1% lasts me a couple of months). Use it only at night, because sunlight breaks it down. So put it on before bed. It can burn a little, and you may get a surprise skin peel at some point. That tends to happen less often as your skin adjusts to it. Rub it in well (gently but thoroughly). More isn't better -- use just enough to cover your face, and I would recommend going down to your neck and using it on the backs of your hands as well. It safe to use around your eye area, but not on your eyelids. If your skin gets inflamed, then back off from the sensitive eye area. I use mine right to the corners of my eyes and the tops of my cheekbones, so I don't go as far as right under my eyelashes. Your dermatologist will have you start with a lower strength and work your way up. Do not start with the strongest!

Go for a high-quality moisturizer. I like YonKa Vital Defense. It's also helpful to use a night mask, like Sephora's Avocado Night Mask. You put on a good layer and sleep with it on. Use a moisturizer with a sunscreen. I like Olay's Total Effects Moisturizer with SPF30, but anything with SPF30 or higher is good. Apply after the Retin-A. Let the Retin-A absorb for a minute or two and then put on your moisturizer.

Using a purifying mud mask at least once a week is wonderful. 

I tried collagen supplements and didn't see much difference. I take HA every day, though. One supplement I've been trying lately is schisandra, and I'm surprised to see my skin looking better than ever. I'm not convinced yet it's the shisandra that's doing it, but I'm going to keep taking it. You can also get topical HA serum and I also like B3 serum.

My biggest recommendation is taking care of your skin from the inside out. That means limited sugar, don't drink, don't smoke, don't go out without a sunscreen. Drink lots of water. Eats lots of fruit and vegetables (esp. berries and foods high in Vit. C). Have a handful of plain nuts and seeds every day. Exercise is excellent for blood flow too. 

I love taking care of my skin and my body, and now that I'm approaching my mid-50s wrinkle-free, I'm really glad I started in my late 30s! Good luck to you! :)


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#223 floweryriddle

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 03:01 AM

 

I'm a man in my mid 20s and started seeing first little wrinkles especially around the eye area and would like to fight this.

Reading this post, Retin-A seems very promising. I'm currently using a eye cream to battle dark circles. Works very slow but seems to improve things.

Questions:
- where do you all get your Retin-A from?
- What percentage should I be looking at?
- Is if safe to apply around eye area?
- Can I use it with regular moisturizer? Before or after the Retin-A?

I'll also look into collagen and HA. Anything else you would recommend? I want to start as early as possible taking care of my skin.

I also have a few acne scars and wanted to go on lasering them later this year with a fractural treatment.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Hi there! I'm a long-time Retin-A user, so I can tell you about that. I get mine from the dermatologist. If you can find a nice dermatologist who will prescribe it, then your insurance will cover it. Otherwise, prescription-strength Retin-A will run you about $100 a month, I think, depending on how long you can make that tube last (so as little as $40-50 a month if you stretch it. One tube of 0.1% lasts me a couple of months). Use it only at night, because sunlight breaks it down. So put it on before bed. It can burn a little, and you may get a surprise skin peel at some point. That tends to happen less often as your skin adjusts to it. Rub it in well (gently but thoroughly). More isn't better -- use just enough to cover your face, and I would recommend going down to your neck and using it on the backs of your hands as well. It safe to use around your eye area, but not on your eyelids. If your skin gets inflamed, then back off from the sensitive eye area. I use mine right to the corners of my eyes and the tops of my cheekbones, so I don't go as far as right under my eyelashes. Your dermatologist will have you start with a lower strength and work your way up. Do not start with the strongest!

Go for a high-quality moisturizer. I like YonKa Vital Defense. It's also helpful to use a night mask, like Sephora's Avocado Night Mask. You put on a good layer and sleep with it on. Use a moisturizer with a sunscreen. I like Olay's Total Effects Moisturizer with SPF30, but anything with SPF30 or higher is good. Apply after the Retin-A. Let the Retin-A absorb for a minute or two and then put on your moisturizer.

Using a purifying mud mask at least once a week is wonderful. 

I tried collagen supplements and didn't see much difference. I take HA every day, though. One supplement I've been trying lately is schisandra, and I'm surprised to see my skin looking better than ever. I'm not convinced yet it's the shisandra that's doing it, but I'm going to keep taking it. You can also get topical HA serum and I also like B3 serum.

My biggest recommendation is taking care of your skin from the inside out. That means limited sugar, don't drink, don't smoke, don't go out without a sunscreen. Drink lots of water. Eats lots of fruit and vegetables (esp. berries and foods high in Vit. C). Have a handful of plain nuts and seeds every day. Exercise is excellent for blood flow too. 

I love taking care of my skin and my body, and now that I'm approaching my mid-50s wrinkle-free, I'm really glad I started in my late 30s! Good luck to you! :)

 

 

Thanks a lot for all the infos!

 

I started looking into Retin-A here in Japan and ran into a site that seems to sell Retino-A branded gel with 0.1% for very very cheap: http://www.japanrx.c...リック_-p-173.html

They seem to sell generic drugs and the Retino-A there uses Tretinoin. With shipping, a tube of 20g 0.1% Retino-A would set me back $20. 

 

Is this the same thing you were talking about here? I thought it would be a lot more expensive. 

 

I'm having a appointment at the dermatologist in a few weeks and wanted to bring it up as well there. 



#224 Gayle63

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 03:53 AM

 

 

I'm a man in my mid 20s and started seeing first little wrinkles especially around the eye area and would like to fight this.

Reading this post, Retin-A seems very promising. I'm currently using a eye cream to battle dark circles. Works very slow but seems to improve things.

Questions:
- where do you all get your Retin-A from?
- What percentage should I be looking at?
- Is if safe to apply around eye area?
- Can I use it with regular moisturizer? Before or after the Retin-A?

I'll also look into collagen and HA. Anything else you would recommend? I want to start as early as possible taking care of my skin.

I also have a few acne scars and wanted to go on lasering them later this year with a fractural treatment.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Hi there! I'm a long-time Retin-A user, so I can tell you about that. I get mine from the dermatologist. If you can find a nice dermatologist who will prescribe it, then your insurance will cover it. Otherwise, prescription-strength Retin-A will run you about $100 a month, I think, depending on how long you can make that tube last (so as little as $40-50 a month if you stretch it. One tube of 0.1% lasts me a couple of months). Use it only at night, because sunlight breaks it down. So put it on before bed. It can burn a little, and you may get a surprise skin peel at some point. That tends to happen less often as your skin adjusts to it. Rub it in well (gently but thoroughly). More isn't better -- use just enough to cover your face, and I would recommend going down to your neck and using it on the backs of your hands as well. It safe to use around your eye area, but not on your eyelids. If your skin gets inflamed, then back off from the sensitive eye area. I use mine right to the corners of my eyes and the tops of my cheekbones, so I don't go as far as right under my eyelashes. Your dermatologist will have you start with a lower strength and work your way up. Do not start with the strongest!

Go for a high-quality moisturizer. I like YonKa Vital Defense. It's also helpful to use a night mask, like Sephora's Avocado Night Mask. You put on a good layer and sleep with it on. Use a moisturizer with a sunscreen. I like Olay's Total Effects Moisturizer with SPF30, but anything with SPF30 or higher is good. Apply after the Retin-A. Let the Retin-A absorb for a minute or two and then put on your moisturizer.

Using a purifying mud mask at least once a week is wonderful. 

I tried collagen supplements and didn't see much difference. I take HA every day, though. One supplement I've been trying lately is schisandra, and I'm surprised to see my skin looking better than ever. I'm not convinced yet it's the shisandra that's doing it, but I'm going to keep taking it. You can also get topical HA serum and I also like B3 serum.

My biggest recommendation is taking care of your skin from the inside out. That means limited sugar, don't drink, don't smoke, don't go out without a sunscreen. Drink lots of water. Eats lots of fruit and vegetables (esp. berries and foods high in Vit. C). Have a handful of plain nuts and seeds every day. Exercise is excellent for blood flow too. 

I love taking care of my skin and my body, and now that I'm approaching my mid-50s wrinkle-free, I'm really glad I started in my late 30s! Good luck to you! :)

 

 

Thanks a lot for all the infos!

 

I started looking into Retin-A here in Japan and ran into a site that seems to sell Retino-A branded gel with 0.1% for very very cheap: http://www.japanrx.c...リック_-p-173.html

They seem to sell generic drugs and the Retino-A there uses Tretinoin. With shipping, a tube of 20g 0.1% Retino-A would set me back $20. 

 

Is this the same thing you were talking about here? I thought it would be a lot more expensive. 

 

I'm having a appointment at the dermatologist in a few weeks and wanted to bring it up as well there. 

 

That sounds like the same stuff, but see if you can get a lesser strength to start and work up to the 0.1%. Maybe the .05%? Good luck! :)



#225 meatsauce

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 03:56 AM

We schold see what form is in the jarrow HA then try and find a pure bulk supplier. 



#226 baccheion

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Posted 23 November 2017 - 02:53 AM

- 24mg silicon (from monomethylsilanetriol; 64% absorption = 15.36mg absorbed = much more likely to get to 30-50mg therapeutic range with good diet)

- 3-6g MSM 

- 1g vitamin C (2:1 with active bioflavonoids)

- Good multivitamin

 

Silicon replaces collagen-boosting and collagen-supplying supplements.


Edited by baccheion, 23 November 2017 - 02:55 AM.

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#227 bosharpe

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Posted 26 November 2017 - 11:07 AM

Is there a specific supplement that stops cheeks from sagging? I Know SOD might have this effect. Anything else?



#228 AnahimSkywalker

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Posted 06 February 2018 - 09:25 PM

Topical EGF in skin care regimen such as CellZyme On-Tox and Bueno Meditech Skin Care Set


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#229 baccheion

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Posted 12 April 2018 - 02:59 PM

- Astaxanthin
- Niacin
- Nicotinamide riboside + pterostilbene
- MSM lotion
- Increased progesterone/pregnenolone (male or female)
- Vitamin K2 MK-4 (+ vitamin D3)
- Gotu kola
- Garlic (garlicin brand)
- Flavonoids
- Omega-3s
- Iodine protocol

Edited by baccheion, 12 April 2018 - 03:10 PM.

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#230 Nate-2004

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Posted 12 April 2018 - 03:48 PM

It's likely that the best way to achieve real skin rejuvenation on the level of looking 18, is to find some way to increase the stem cell population all the while lengthening telomeres. This could on its own reignite the level of turnover required or it may possibly require an extra push with something (because why does turnover slow down?) and I'm not talking about derma rolling. Keeping skin moisturized and eating healthy may slow the inevitable but you're not going to see the full on reversal you want to see with any supplementation. You basically need to restore bone density, subcutaneous fat tissue, fat pad elasticity, and to restore the full production of hyaluronic acid, collagen and elastin you had as a teenager. The increased turnover may not even be enough because you'd need regrowth of lost tissue and what does that take? Targeted growth hormone of some kind? How do you replenish the skin's stem cell pool? Where are stem cells located in the skin? 

 

https://www.eurostem...hat-can-they-do

 

 

Whatever you do, for now, just use Cerave moisturizer, maybe an HA matryxl 3000 vitamin C formulation and that's about it. I don't know if voluplus works at all at this point, I've not seen anything of it.

 

Also, never wash your face with soap, never dry it after showering and leave it wet before applying moisturizers because this helps considerably with absorption. 

 

 

  • Epidermal stem cells are responsible for everyday regeneration of the different layers of the epidermis. These stem cells are found in the basal layer of the epidermis.
  • Hair follicle stem cells ensure constant renewal of the hair follicles. They can also regenerate the epidermis and sebaceous glands if these tissues are damaged. Hair follicle stem cells are found throughout the hair follicles. 
  • Melanocyte stem cells are responsible for regeneration of melanocytes, a type of pigment cell. Melanocytes produce the pigment melanin, and therefore play an important role in skin and hair follicle pigmentation. It is not yet certain where these stem cells are found in humans.

 

Currently the hyper religious hyper hesitant control of the FDA keeps everyone's hands tied. They can only treat diseases and conditions, not aging. There's a lot of money in vanity and a lot of money in cosmetic therapies, yet because vanity is a sin, apparently, the focus of research is disconnected from this funding. 


Edited by Nate-2004, 12 April 2018 - 04:00 PM.

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#231 baccheion

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Posted 12 April 2018 - 08:59 PM

It's likely that the best way to achieve real skin rejuvenation on the level of looking 18, is to find some way to increase the stem cell population all the while lengthening telomeres. This could on its own reignite the level of turnover required or it may possibly require an extra push with something (because why does turnover slow down?) and I'm not talking about derma rolling. Keeping skin moisturized and eating healthy may slow the inevitable but you're not going to see the full on reversal you want to see with any supplementation. You basically need to restore bone density, subcutaneous fat tissue, fat pad elasticity, and to restore the full production of hyaluronic acid, collagen and elastin you had as a teenager. The increased turnover may not even be enough because you'd need regrowth of lost tissue and what does that take? Targeted growth hormone of some kind? How do you replenish the skin's stem cell pool? Where are stem cells located in the skin?

https://www.eurostem...hat-can-they-do


Whatever you do, for now, just use Cerave moisturizer, maybe an HA matryxl 3000 vitamin C formulation and that's about it. I don't know if voluplus works at all at this point, I've not seen anything of it.

Also, never wash your face with soap, never dry it after showering and leave it wet before applying moisturizers because this helps considerably with absorption.



Currently the hyper religious hyper hesitant control of the FDA keeps everyone's hands tied. They can only treat diseases and conditions, not aging. There's a lot of money in vanity and a lot of money in cosmetic therapies, yet because vanity is a sin, apparently, the focus of research is disconnected from this funding.

Epitalon is said to do something along those lines. There's also maintaining sufficient hormone and nutrient levels (see NutrEval w/ hormone panel). A slow drain of silicon is said to be the cause of collagen breakdown, as well as insufficient/imbalanced progesterone.

Monomethylsilanetriol (24 mg 2x/day), due to it's higher 64% bioavailability, makes it more likely one will get into the therapeutic range (30-50 mg silicon absorbed). 10 mg of BioSil, to compare, provides only 1.7 mg absorbed silicon. Maintenance involves taking 12-24 mg monomethylsilanetriol. iHerb has a version.

(NWC) MSM lotion evens skin, creates a glow, and heals/minimizes skin damage. I'm trying it now to see if it gets rid of stretch marks as claimed.

Edited by baccheion, 12 April 2018 - 09:05 PM.

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#232 Adamzski

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Posted 12 April 2018 - 09:08 PM

Im getting back into it. Will not use Retin-A again, have looked more into it and there is a risk of lung cancer, especially for a smoker (Just IQOS now).

 

What about MK-677? I was taking that properly for a few months and made my skin so soft to touch plus gave me some tightening or just a healthy look. But, the softness was more discernable than any cosmetic effects.

 

Have not been using any lotions or potions for months now but up until Feb this year was regularly boosting my HGH.

 

Need something to replace the Retin-A as a very effective topical. Maybe MitoQ lotion.



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#233 baccheion

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Posted 12 April 2018 - 09:26 PM

Im getting back into it. Will not use Retin-A again, have looked more into it and there is a risk of lung cancer, especially for a smoker (Just IQOS now).

What about MK-677? I was taking that properly for a few months and made my skin so soft to touch plus gave me some tightening or just a healthy look. But, the softness was more discernable than any cosmetic effects.

Have not been using any lotions or potions for months now but up until Feb this year was regularly boosting my HGH.

Need something to replace the Retin-A as a very effective topical. Maybe MitoQ lotion.

Have you ever tried one of the higher rated MSM lotions? It seems to contain everything relevant (look at the ingredients), and is more likely, due to MSM, to penetrate deeply.

#234 Nate-2004

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Posted 12 April 2018 - 11:58 PM

MK677 is not going to do much for skin hate to say, much less anything else to my knowledge. It was a waste for me. I've not heard anything about silicon being even remotely related to aging skin.

 

I'm considering MSM now but so far I haven't heard anything definitively positive about it other than testimonial claims.

 

As I said it's going to be more comprehensive than anything you can just put on your skin or take orally.


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#235 baccheion

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 01:36 AM

MK677 is not going to do much for skin hate to say, much less anything else to my knowledge. It was a waste for me. I've not heard anything about silicon being even remotely related to aging skin.

I'm considering MSM now but so far I haven't heard anything definitively positive about it other than testimonial claims.

As I said it's going to be more comprehensive than anything you can just put on your skin or take orally.

MSM lotion takes a few weeks (maybe even a few days) to show if it will be effective or not. Easy to try. There's said to be extra benefit from taking it both topically and orally (MSM + silicon as monomethylsilanetriol + vitamin C; 4:1 MSM:C).

Consider the ingredient list of the following MSM lotion: https://www.amazon.c...n/dp/B004RC9KH6. It seems MSM is mainly a carrier that allows other nutrients to penetrate much deeper.

Edited by baccheion, 13 April 2018 - 01:43 AM.


#236 Matt

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Posted 15 April 2018 - 08:34 PM

I'd swap out the brand Garlicin and go for Allicin Max.

 

I take 4 a day. :)


Edited by Matt, 15 April 2018 - 08:35 PM.


#237 baccheion

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Posted 16 April 2018 - 05:04 AM

I'd swap out the brand Garlicin and go for Allicin Max.

I take 4 a day. :)

Why's that? How certain are you that Allicin Max results in comparable/better allicin release?

#238 Matt

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Posted 16 April 2018 - 12:32 PM

Allicin Max doesn't have "allicin potential.". It has stabilized allicin in the capsule.I wrote an article on it here.


Edited by Matt, 16 April 2018 - 12:33 PM.


#239 ninjamonk69

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Posted 26 May 2018 - 07:55 AM

MSM, Silica, Aloe Vera and Nano-Pearl Powder are really good for skin.



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#240 BieraK

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Posted 14 August 2018 - 10:17 PM

I have a home made cream which works very well to keep the youth of the skin.
The only side "effect" of the cream is that is composed of several ingredients, so there is a risk of "bad" interactions

I use a 100 gram Rose Hyps comercial cream as a base, then I added:

-2 grams centella asiatica extract powder

-1 gram Niacinamide

-1 gram D-Ribose

-500 mg Hyaluronic Acid

-1 gram Aloe Vera extract

-3 mg USP Methylene blue

 


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