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Hi, I built NutraHacker which takes your 23andMe file and hacks your nutritional needs!

nutrition genetics 23andme decode nutritional genomics nutrigenomics

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#1 bigsend

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Posted 13 December 2013 - 08:54 AM


Since I've been a longtime member here, I thought I would give out some free reports (beta testers welcome!) with my project at www.nutrahacker.com
which takes your 23andMe genetics file and returns a report of homozygous and heterozygous mutations that affect your nutritional needs. It is a way for us supplement aficionados to be more exact and scientific with what we take. So far, the program analyzes 160 polymorphisms and lets you know which supplements might be particularly good for you and which to avoid. The blog goes into a couple specific examples like the genes PEMT and BCMO1 which affect your need for choline and vitamin A. It also reports a lot of information about CFS and methylation genes. Check out the sample report to see more.

If you are interested, please email promotions@nutrahacker.com - the first 20 will receive a free analysis! Of course, you need to have 23andMe data.

If you have any questions, please ask them here!

Edited by bigsend, 13 December 2013 - 09:04 AM.

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#2 bigsend

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 08:30 AM

No more free reports available, sorry! I hope lots of you got in on the offer and that the information turns out to be valuable. Personally, I learned that I should be taking Vitamin A, DIM, Vitamin D, lithium orotate, and methylfolate. It is pretty cool actually because of these I already knew I liked DIM and lithium orotate, and my blood test at the Dr.'s office always shows low vitamin D, which seems to be due to these Vitamin D receptor homozygous mutations.
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#3 woleile

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Posted 29 December 2013 - 02:41 AM

You're advising n-acetyl-tyrosine for mutations in tryptophan hydroxylase. Did you mean n-acetyl-tryptophan?

#4 maxwatt

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Posted 29 December 2013 - 03:25 AM

... and can you make the reports available as a spreadsheet?

#5 nupi

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 02:47 PM

This looks fairly useful but there is no way I will pay 37USD for reports in PDF that are that hard to read (not to mention ugly)...

#6 bigsend

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 10:02 PM

You're advising n-acetyl-tyrosine for mutations in tryptophan hydroxylase. Did you mean n-acetyl-tryptophan?



Those mutations seem to increase the levels of tryptophan in the brain, which leads to fatigue. N-acetyl-tyrosine will compete with tryptophan, "crowding it out" and would be a good tactic to mitigate that sort of fatigue.
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#7 bigsend

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 10:07 PM

I've been working on adding some updates to the program which will improve it drastically. I will look into providing an excel spreadsheet, let me know if there are other features that you would like to see.

#8 etizsupplyusa.com

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 05:18 AM

This is really really cool in concept. I think you need to do a kickstarter, then look for venture capital if neccessary. Use the proceeds to consult with a biochemist and geneticist, (maybe neuroscientist) and also hire a website designer to create an easy to modify site that creates pretty, easy to read print outs that are both mailed and emailed to the buyer.

This is a fantastic idea that with some funding could become incredibly useful, the new atkins diet but based on real science and actually helpful. Screw all these diet trends, do the kickstarter, make it legitimate and try to sign a deal with 23 and me. Convince them that the publicity of the marketing of the diet plan will substantially increase genetic data available to them, as well as drastically increase sales. You could then potentially advertise a package deal that gives you not only gives you significantly important health data, as well as the perfect diet plan to extend their lifespan and make people more productive and healthy feeling- all this built on your individual genetic profile (the 23 and me deal isn't necessary, but I could see them being open to it as it creates publicity for them and you might have access to some of their scientific talent- you would need to have the kickstarter done and the diet plan working fairly well). Even without them, you could still make a major breakthrough in the diet community. THAT would be a hell of a money maker as well as a hell of a way to really help people.

Just some long term thinking to potentially help you turn you're small project into the next big thing in the diet world. I sincerely hope all goes well for you!
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#9 kai2

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 07:53 AM

It is odd to be having this conversation at a time that 23andme appears to be dead in the water, evidently thanks to the lobbying power of the medical industry and the recent withdrawal of Google's protection (what did 23andme's CEO think would happen when her marriage to one of Google's co-founders hit the skids?). Hopefully, 23andme will somehow recover, but in the meantime, wouldn't a nutrahacker Kickstarter be on hold?
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#10 etizsupplyusa.com

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 09:41 AM

I didn't know 23andme was hurting so bad wow... nor did I know about the divorce. I was reading about the new FDA regulations, perhaps if the kickstarter went well, they could in a sense reverse engineer 23andme's methodology, but instead of giving percentages of risk and stuff like that, analyze the raw data and directly make dietary recommendations that are incredibly personalized- based on tried and true diets, tweaked with the help of the bioinformaticion hired/consulted with from the kickstarter money. People could enter stats like weight, height, bmi, age, family history of illness- and perhaps that combined with the raw data could give unique dietary recommendations. If needed, it could be made expense at first, a fad aimed at the rich. The media attention this would almost certainly bring could increase the customer base allowing prices to be slowly lowered. This is still a possibility if somebody experienced in nutrional bioinformatics was brought on as he could help turn the raw data into nutritional recommendations. It could be find tuned as funds are increased, made more accurate and cheap.

Just an idea, I tend to dream big and it was just a thought that came to mind.

That ruling about the FDA deeming their service a medical device is crazy... they should have slowly regulated and given companies like 23andme time to comply- this could put the industry almost out of business, at least temporarily.

Anyways just some random ideas about how to potentially make this go from an excel file based on data that can no longer be generated into a major company. Ignore me if you like, I don't mind, I was merely trying to help/brainstorming/rambling. With 23andme hurting so bad I can't see the original companies business model doing very well, as there will be alot less people with full raw data, at least short term.

This might be a nonsensical idea, that tends to happen when I stay up till 5am (I'm quite the insomniac), but it is possible, and since you are only giving dietary advice, based on real personalized science, I don't think the FDA regulations would apply, but my 10 minutes of research cannot exactly confirm that.

Goodnight/morning lol

Evan.

Edited by etizsupplyusa.com, 08 January 2014 - 09:46 AM.


#11 hav

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 08:14 PM

Here's an article about it that suggests that external analytical tools may be a way around the fda's 23amdme concerns:

23andMe Bows To FDA's Demands, Drops Health Claims

...
On 23andMe's Facebook page, Susan Price Davis for clarification of its new approach:



"I am confused... You say no health related results will be returned, but you say all raw data will be returned. So, we get the health related results, just not the interpretation?"

The company replied:



"You get the raw data about your genotype with no interpretation from 23andMe. That's correct."

And with the raw data in hand, motivated consumers will still be able to run health analyses using tools available online.


Of course the fda may also try to stamp out all analytical tools and public information sources. Wonder if they're going to send WebMD and PubMed.gov letters too?

Howard

#12 trance

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 08:25 PM

There's another company that has been doing this already for quite some time:

https://promethease.com/ondemand

#13 hav

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 12:25 AM

Here are some more details on the 23andme legal issues:

FDA November 2013 Warning letter

Lisa Casey v. 23andMe (13-CV-2847H) Class Action Complaint

Howard

#14 maxwatt

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 02:04 AM

I don't think they can do that, the analytical tools are not a medical device, as are the gene chips that 23and me uses. It is their interpretation of the results that make it a "medical device" in the FDA's twisted universe. But Promethease, Genetic Genie, Nutrahacker and others are no more medical devices than is an astrological chart. And I suspect not that much more accurate at our present state of knowledge given undiscovered SNP effects and interactions;

#15 hav

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 04:43 PM

Actually it is quite twisted to call a genetic propensity estimate medical advise. A close reading of the FDA warning letter seems to suggest the spit mailer and/or the chip are medical devices because ordinary mortals may misunderstand the estimates and presumably run to their doctors for more tests and/or operations. Sounds like a justification to stamp out any public information source that might be misunderstood, maybe even mortality statistics and web sites like ours. Even ancestry services because, after all, if we figure out who our ancestors were and what they died of, we may misunderstand that data too. I would certainly expect them to apply their logic to 3rd party services that like Nutcracker and Promethease who directly assist in connecting the dots between raw gene data and scientific studies.

I haven't read the statutes the FDA is relying on for this action. I was under the impression that they only had the power to regulate devices used for treatment or diagnosis of a disease or condition. And not devices like computer programs, chips, and bottles that could be used to estimate probabilities of getting sick. Does the FDA have the power to regulate signs that say, "Wash your hands?" If the correctness of the gene data or the validity of the scientific evidence connected to it is their real concern, that could be dealt with easily enough with clearer disclaimers.

Howard

#16 hav

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 09:49 PM

Just got a chance to look up the statute cited by the FDA:

21 USC 321(h)

(h) The term “device” (except when used in paragraph (n) of this section and in sections 331(i), 343(f), 352©, and 362© of this title) means an instrument, apparatus, implement, machine, contrivance, implant, in vitro reagent, or other similar or related article, including any component, part, or accessory, which is—

(1) recognized in the official National Formulary, or the United States Pharmacopeia, or any supplement to them,
(2) intended for use in the diagnosis of disease or other conditions, or in the cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of disease, in man or other animals, or
(3) intended to affect the structure or any function of the body of man or other animals, and

which does not achieve its primary intended purposes through chemical action within or on the body of man or other animals and which is not dependent upon being metabolized for the achievement of its primary intended purposes.


Looks a bit more broadly worded than I expected but there might be a construction issue as between (1), (2), and (3). But, fwiw, when I looked up the US Pharmacopeial Convention from (1), I only found genetic, organ, and cellular materials listed there, not machines or chips to identify genes or any related databases. Might turn on whether a court thinks Congress intended the FDA to regulate public access to genetic mapping knowledge.

Howard

#17 bigsend

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Posted 16 January 2014 - 08:39 AM

The field is known as nutritional genomics and a major proponent is Dr. Bruce Ames (one of the mostly highly cited scientists of all time, http://www.bruceames.org/). Not at all like using an astrological sign for health tips, although that really depends on the quality of the snps chosen.

I spend most of my time reading and looking for the most researched and actionable snps to add to the list. That is the difference between NutraHacker and other programs. Some of them actually are reporting on snps that have exactly 0 publications listed in pubmed. That is very bad and will harm the credibility of the field.

I'm very aware that the programs may well be considered medical devices, however I will do my best to adhere strictly to dietary and supplement advice and not inform about disease risk. This is not easy when many snps are only correlated to various diseases. It will be interesting to see if Promethease is allowed to continue as-is in the near future because they are by far flaunting the same rules that forced 23andMe to stop discussing health conditions. Perhaps being a 3rd party application helps, or the fact that instead of telling an individual that they have a higher risk of some disease they point them to the research.

On that note, I did use Promethease and then decided NutraHacker needed to be created. There are too many snps to look through, most don't have any research, and there isn't actionable information offered. It is useful if you know exactly what you are looking for and can do the research yourself- so in this regard it is simply a better way of presenting the raw data over the way it is done by 23andMe. I'm trying to distill the most interesting information and present a functional picture of your health. In addition there is a questionnaire that will be used to launch a large-scale research program into conditions like chronic fatigue and fibromyalgia.

There are a lot of updates in progress so stay tuned!

Edited by bigsend, 16 January 2014 - 08:42 AM.


#18 kai2

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 04:37 AM

Since I posted back on 1/8, what I've heard suggests that 23&me has identified the loophole they will use that makes them still useful: new customers will receive only ancestry info -- not disease risk info...along with their raw data. The unstated idea is that customers will then input that data into Promethease, Nutrahacker or Genetic Genie.

At any rate, that is what I've heard.

If true, then maybe this will work long enough to buy 23&me time to build a coalition strong enough to beat back the FDA. Without Google's protection, its a longer shot, but one can hope

#19 hav

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 10:05 PM

I'm very aware that the programs may well be considered medical devices, however I will do my best to adhere strictly to dietary and supplement advice and not inform about disease risk. This is not easy when many snps are only correlated to various diseases. It will be interesting to see if Promethease is allowed to continue as-is in the near future because they are by far flaunting the same rules that forced 23andMe to stop discussing health conditions. Perhaps being a 3rd party application helps, or the fact that instead of telling an individual that they have a higher risk of some disease they point them to the research.


Since possible public misunderstanding is so prominently mentioned in the fda warning letter, maybe most of their concerns could be minimized by point and click acknowledgements of disclaimers. But they do seem to be asserting a requirement for prior approval which could impact the legality of the Personal Genome Project if they don't already formally have it.

Pgp is interesting because their point and click acknowledgement isn't just one question. Its more like a Harvard medical school admissions test on genetics with the only passing score being 100%. Granted, its stated purpose is informed consent to the submission of information to a public genetic database and transfer of ownership of the dna submitted, but that approach also takes the wind out of the sails of most of the fda's reasoning. Their biggest problem is pgp wasn't getting anywhere near their enrollment goal of 100,000 with such rigorous participation requirements. Which is why I think they helped push 23andMe along. Clearly the fda is hurting pgp and its goals more than anyone. Which includes the advancement of genetic research.

Actually, I wonder if the fda is in step with the rest of the US government on this. Just think what the nsa could do with a national genetic database. Bet they'd be more inclined to amend the Affordable Care Act to add genetic registration as part of its minimum acceptable health insurance requirements.

Howard

#20 bigsend

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 06:24 PM

The site has been updated: now receive a free methylation and detoxification analysis! Still $37 for the full report.

Edited by bigsend, 19 January 2014 - 06:24 PM.

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#21 bigsend

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 09:21 AM

The report has been updated now to include 265 different polymorphisms including ones influencing adiponectin levels (obesity), cholesterol, mental health, and heavy metal sensitivity.

#22 gwgaston

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 04:52 AM

https://geneticgenie.org has a "methylation analysis" and "detox" section that uses your data file from 23andme as well. I've looked at their methylation analysis but I'm just now trying out their detox page.

I also just tried your 'free methylation and detoxification analysis' bigsend and it looks nice. I like the visualization tool. That said like most things in life this report is not so cut-n-dry. I'm told to take methyl donors such as TMG, methyl folate and B12, etc in the 'Take' section and yet in the 'Avoid' section I see listed "Methyl donors". I see you have two different "lens", but looking at zygosity still is not enough. This type of contradiction leaves one still with the need to go back to each related mutation and weigh it based on its possible true significance to your health. Lucky for us though your visual tool allows one to click through the "supplement" in question and see the mutation (in my case with CBS and VDR with concern to methyl donors), what SNP(s) where involved and even gives the 'Consequences'. This helps... especially when I combine it with the report on each mutation from geneticgenie.org


Edited by gwgaston, 12 May 2014 - 05:18 AM.

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#23 n0stress4me

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Posted 02 February 2015 - 02:04 AM

I'm getting an ancestryDNA test done and would like to upload my raw data into either of the 2 sites mentioned in this thread or any others that are recommended.  Are these the best options?

Thanks!



#24 chipdouglas

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Posted 02 February 2015 - 02:14 AM

I'm getting an ancestryDNA test done and would like to upload my raw data into either of the 2 sites mentioned in this thread or any others that are recommended.  Are these the best options?

Thanks!

 

There's also this one : http://www.snpedia.c...php/Promethease



#25 n0stress4me

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Posted 02 February 2015 - 03:44 AM

Great, thanks Chipdouglas.


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#26 Chris_T_Malta

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Posted 17 April 2015 - 05:49 AM

Hi,

 

Can someone confirm the usefulness of making this "methylation analysis" and "detox"  test?

 

I got 23andme raw data in hand and the price seems reasonable, but I would like to know the "why" and the "but" of the whole thing.

 

 

(Ps. I got the Promethease report in hand too)

 


Edited by Chris Tanti, 17 April 2015 - 05:49 AM.

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#27 Chris_T_Malta

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Posted 26 October 2015 - 05:39 PM

Well yesterday I bought the Nutrahacker's test and it is suggesting a whole array of supplements.

 

I am a bit confused cause the report both encourages (MTRR) and asks me to avoid (COMT) Methyl B12.

 

On the other hand, it encourages Hydroxy B12. So what's the difference?

 

The report asks me to avoid both high-carb diets (due to diabetes risks) and high-fat diets due to PON1, USF1. I guess a low-glycemic carb-rich diet is the way to go.

 

It encourages probiotics for FUT2.. not sure how reliable probiotics science is though.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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#28 Aurel

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Posted 16 November 2015 - 10:44 PM

Today I got my 23andme results. But Nutrahacker seems down. Will this be temporary?



#29 xEva

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Posted 17 November 2015 - 01:24 AM

I also tried it a week ago and the site appeared to have been hacked (an idiotic image was displayed saying something to that effect). Strange that he has not restored it yet.

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#30 Aurel

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Posted 17 November 2015 - 01:57 PM

Thank you for the information.





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