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What stem cells tissues have been used on people

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#31 seivtcho

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Posted 03 February 2015 - 12:39 PM

I know you have an interest in neuroregeneration so I'm wondering did you hear about the experiment where an injured mouse brain was coerced into repair by injecting a virus caring a Sox2 gene which gave microglial cells the ability for pluripotency (or at least the ability to form into other cells - in this case neurons - they share traits with) for a short while.

 

Direct reprogramming of cells is a method I'm personally more interested in because it doesn't require an extensive in vitro procedure. For things like myocardial infarction and stroke for instance it makes more sense because it can be done right after the patient is stabilized maximizing the chance for full recovery.

 

I didn't hear about this experiment, but it is quite interesting. I, have been imagining regeneration of brain by implanting somehow stem cells in the brain directly or through the blood stream.
 

Direct reprogramming perhaps will be less expensive, but how you will tickle the needed gene in the brain cells? If you use viruses, won't you make a virus encephalitis? But if this happen in people, and it is safe, it will be wonderful.



#32 seivtcho

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 07:47 AM

 

Japanese woman is first recipient of next-generation stem cells
Surgeons implanted retinal tissue created after reverting the patient's own cells to 'pluripotent' state.

http://www.nature.co...m-cells-1.15915

 

Another article for people reversing partially their vision via embryonic stem cells

 

http://www.iflscienc...stem-sight-loss
 

...

 

Here is the scientific article about the usage of embryotic stem cells for retinal repeirment. In .pdf full text

 

http://download.thel...73614613763.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Will some one else would try to invest 5-10 minutes of his free time and try to to find a scientific article for some of the usages of the stem cells? Or I will be the only one, who is doing a black work here.


Edited by seivtcho, 05 February 2015 - 07:48 AM.


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#33 seivtcho

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Posted 06 February 2015 - 08:09 PM

This web site:

 

https://clinicaltrials.gov/

 

gives a lot of studies on people, concerning stem cells. Some of them are completed, and are marked as "Has results". I can't however see published the result for many of them.

 

Here is one with a published studies:

 

https://clinicaltria...rction"&rank=39

 

 

And the studies published:

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm....9?dopt=Abstract

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm....7?dopt=Abstract



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#34 sthira

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Posted 06 February 2015 - 08:33 PM

I just wish they'd get on with meniscal repair. Build a scaffold, cake it with hip stem cells, grow it, insert it... Why doesn't it work... Sounds easy but apparently it ain't or else it'd be wildly successful. One of the primary problems is how to keep the stem cells glued into place to prevent them from traveling around elsewhere & causing potential havoc.
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#35 seivtcho

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Posted 06 February 2015 - 08:37 PM

"Build a scaffold, cake it with hip stem cells, grow it, insert it"

This is one of the things, that can happen. Simply no one is doing it for meniscal repair via meniscal transplant.


Edited by seivtcho, 06 February 2015 - 08:38 PM.


#36 sthira

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Posted 06 February 2015 - 09:02 PM

"Build a scaffold, cake it with hip stem cells, grow it, insert it"
This is one of the things, that can happen. Simply no one is doing it for meniscal repair via meniscal transplant.


Well, they're successfully doing it with sheep. Humans? Oh..."in the next five to ten years..." Haha. Same ole story. One issue is:

"To capitalize on the general public’s sense of optimism about stem cells, there are snake oil clinics that have sprung up all over the world selling unproven therapies to unsuspecting patients,” Morrison said.

Most such clinics operate outside the United States, in countries with less oversight. But earlier this year, the FDA brought criminal charges against a doctor on the Texas-Mexico border for hawking stem cell transplants as a treatment for brain damage and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

It is to weed out these unscrupulous doctors that the FDA requires as much clinical research as it does before it approves new treatments.

“People complain about the FDA a lot, but the FDA protects the public from snake oil salesmen,” Morrison said."

http://www.healthlin...-promise-083114
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#37 seivtcho

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Posted 06 February 2015 - 09:19 PM

Some of the p[ublished things may really be not correct. But how to understand which one is correct, and which one is not? It is virtually impossible.



#38 sthira

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Posted 12 February 2015 - 01:11 AM


Stem cell isolated that gives rise to bones, cartilage in mice


http://www.medicalne...ases/288115.php

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have discovered the stem cell in mice that gives rise to bone, cartilage and a key part of bone marrow called the stroma.

In addition, the researchers have charted the chemical signals that can create skeletal stem cells and steer their development into each of these specific tissues. The discovery sets the stage for a wide range of potential therapies for skeletal disorders such as bone fractures, brittle bones, osteosarcoma or damaged cartilage.

A paper describing the findings are published in Cell.

"Millions of times a year, orthopedic surgeons see torn cartilage in a joint and have to take it out because cartilage doesn't heal well, but that lack of cartilage predisposes the patient to arthritisdown the road," said Michael Longaker, MD, a professor of plastic and reconstructive surgery at Stanford and a senior author of the paper. "This research raises the possibility that we can create new skeletal stem cells from patients' own tissues and use them to grow new cartilage." Longaker is also co-director of the Stanford Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine.

An intensive search

The researchers started by focusing on groups of cells that divide rapidly at the ends of mouse bones, and then showed that these collections of cells could form all parts of bone: the bone itself, cartilage and the stroma -- the spongy tissue at the center of bones that helps hematopoietic stem cells turn into blood and immune cells. Through extensive effort, they then identified a single type of cell that could, by itself, form all these elements of the skeleton.

The scientists then went much further, mapping the developmental tree of skeletal stem cells to track exactly how they changed into intermediate progenitor cells and eventually each type of skeletal tissue.

"Mapping the tree led to an in-depth understanding of all the genetic switches that have to be flipped in order to give rise to more specific progenitors and eventually highly specialized cells," said postdoctoral scholar Charles Chan, PhD, who shares lead authorship of the paper with postdoctoral scholar David Lo, MD, graduate student James Chen and research assistant Elly Eun Young Seo. With that information, the researchers were able to find factors that, when provided in the right amount and at the right time, would steer the development of skeletal stem cells into bone, cartilage or stromal cells.

"If this is translated into humans, we then have a way to isolate skeletal stem cells and rescue cartilage from wear and tear or aging, repair bones that have nonhealing fractures and renew the bone marrow niche in those who have had it damaged in one way or another," said Irving Weissman, MD, professor of pathology and of developmental biology, who directs the Stanford Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine. Weissman, the other senior author of the paper, also holds the Virginia and Daniel K. Ludwig Professorship in Clinical Investigation in Cancer Research.

Reprogramming fat cells

In addition to learning how to create bone, cartilage and stromal cells out of skeletal stem cells, the researchers found out how to create skeletal stem cells themselves out of fat or muscle cells. The ability to reprogram mature fat cells directly into skeletal stem cells through the application of specific signals "was really interesting and quite unexpected," Longaker said.

It raises fascinating possibilities for future therapies, he added. "Right now, if you have lost a significant portion of your leg or jaw bones, you have to borrow from Peter to pay Paul in that you have to cut another bone like the fibula into the shape you need, move it and attach it to the blood supply," said Longaker, who is also the Deane P. and Louise Mitchell Professor in the School of Medicine. "But if your existing bone is not available or not sufficient, using this research you might be able to put some of your own fat into a biomimetic scaffold, let it grow into the bone you want in a muscle or fat pocket, and then move that new bone to where it's needed."

Other therapies might be deployed in one surgical session, Chan said. "The number of skeletal stem cells decreases dramatically with age, so bone fractures or dental implants don't heal very well in the elderly because new bone doesn't grow easily," he said. "But perhaps you will be able to take fat from the patient's body during surgery, combine it with these reprogramming factors right there in the operating room and immediately transplant new skeletal stem cells back into the patient."

Now that the researchers have successfully mapped the skeletal stem cell system in mice, they are confident that they will be able to do the same in humans. "In this research we now have a Rosetta stone that should help find the human skeletal stem cells and decode the chemical language they use to steer their development," Chan said. "The pathways in humans should be very similar and share many of the major genes used in the mouse skeletal system."
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#39 Sanhar

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Posted 12 February 2015 - 02:10 AM

Since nobody of you is giving a feedback or opinion on stem cells therapies, I found a blog of a boy, who gives positive feedbacks for a stem cell therapy for healing blood 's cancer, using his brother's stem cells.

 

http://aspoon-full-o...transplant.html

 

Well I think it's that not all of us are technical minded about these things as we're not all scientists.  I personally have a great interest in stem cell development and I have read about how people have had spinal repairs, acl repairs, things like that.

 

I believe that in a few years these treatments will be more mainstream and then there will be a wider base of opinion to draw from.  I'm really quite impressed that you even found all these reports, they never turned up when I was looking.  Maybe I need to learn to google more effectively :P


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#40 seivtcho

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Posted 12 February 2015 - 09:55 AM

Hello Sanhar! Thank you for the interest in this topic!

 

The key is in the time, that you can spend in the search. Google is perfect. You may try also youtube, other sources, such as scientific journals, info, that you got by a chance, or from another topic, sites, that collect clinical studies and info, that you got by another way - tv, radio, usual newspapers. The key is to dig in internet as a chicken hunting for worms.

 

You may try for example, to find what you have red about how people have had spinal repairs and acl repairs. What is acl by the way?

 

If you don't have much time, then you may invest 5-10 minutes a day, for example before to go to sleep, for searching about something. For example, you may like some of the above findings, and try to find a scientific study for it, or another study, diferent from the cited, or try to find patients feed back in some forum, whatever.

 

You will be surprised how much information about some topic you will be able to get, if you invest 5-6 minutes a day, and save the result (not starting from scratch each time).

 

 

 

 

 

Here is an article about using stem cells to treat sickle cell anemia

 

http://www.scienceda...20618194714.htm

 

 

Some info about this type of anemia:

 

http://en.wikipedia....le-cell_disease

"Sickle-cell disease (SCD), or sickle-cell anaemia (SCA) or sometimes drepanocytosis, is a hereditary blood disorder, characterized by an abnormality in the oxygen-carrying haemoglobin molecule in red blood cells."

"Almost 300,000 children are born with a form of sickle-cell disease every year, mostly in sub-Saharan Africa, but also in other countries such as the West Indies and in people of African origin"
 



#41 seivtcho

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Posted 15 February 2015 - 09:46 AM

I found a confirmation study for humans, of the theory, that stem cells in the blood can reach the brain and turn into brain cells.

 

They have found, that people, who were treated with a bone marrow transplantation, as a part of the treatment of hematologic malignancies, have brain cells with the sex chromozomes of the donor.

 

Here is a link to the full text article:

 

http://www.pnas.org/...100/4/2088.full

 

"The data presented show that adult human bone marrow cells can contribute to mature Purkinje neurons in adult women with hematologic malignancies. Even though this is not a frequent event (0.1% of the cells examined), it is surprising that it occurs at all because the generation or repair of these cells after birth had not been documented ... "

 

 

 


Edited by seivtcho, 15 February 2015 - 09:47 AM.


#42 seivtcho

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Posted 15 February 2015 - 10:04 AM

And several minutes later, I found a disprovel lol :)

 

This article claims, that the stem cells simply "spontaneously fuse" with the cells, and don't produce new cells after all.

 

http://www.nature.co.../nature730.html



#43 seivtcho

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Posted 15 February 2015 - 11:52 AM

Another stem cells research for repairing skin after burns. From the year of 1991. But abstract and full text not available.

 

http://www.nature.co...can1191-96.html



#44 seivtcho

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Posted 16 February 2015 - 08:03 AM

A Russian web site of a grant? from the Russian government for the development of tissue engineering.

 

http://www.regmedgrant.com/
http://www.regmedgra...p?id=4&lang=eng
 

They show interesting things there, including a tissue engineered trachea, transplanted in Russia.

 

http://www.regmedgra...hp?id=6&news=30
http://www.regmedgra...ews=30&lang=eng



#45 seivtcho

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Posted 13 March 2015 - 07:39 PM

Here is an article abstract of usage of stem cells to treat hemophilia:

 

http://circres.ahajo.../4/343.abstract

 

 



#46 zorba990

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Posted 26 July 2015 - 02:56 AM

Joints http://stemsd.com/
cost is something on the order of $8,000
Use an HSA and it would be tax deductable

from the faq
"Patients who are considered to be candidates based on information provided in the candidate application form and discussions with our Patient Services Representatives will be invited for a physician consultation.

A $250 fee is charged for this consultation, which includes office evaluation and/or physician review of X-rays, medical records, and telephone consultations. The San Diego Stem Cell Treatment Center will apply this fee toward the cost of the procedure if you decide to proceed.

Unfortunately, insurance generally will not cover the actual cost of stem cell treatment since it is still considered experimental.

A standard treatment fee for musculoskeletal conditions is $8,000. The fee covers fat cell harvesting, cell preparation, PRP and stem cell deployment for up to two joints in one out-patient procedure. Because of recent innovations in technology, the San Diego Stem Cell Treatment Center is able to provide outpatient stem cell treatment at a fraction of the cost of that seen in many overseas clinics.

Our office accepts all major credit cards. In addition, financing may be available through Med Loan Finance. For information, please visit www.medloanfinance.com.

In addition, you may be able to use your HSA and/or FSA. Please check with your provider."
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#47 seivtcho

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Posted 26 July 2015 - 05:15 AM

I wonder what is the success rate in that clinic. 



#48 seivtcho

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Posted 13 August 2015 - 04:11 PM

It seems stem cells have been used for restoring the lost blood production after blood cancer hemotherapy.

 

http://www.healthart...-myeloma-cases/



#49 mpe

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Posted 14 August 2015 - 11:15 AM

This company here (Regenexx) claims, that regenerates cartilages and meniscus using stem cells derived from bone marrow and blood. I wonder if some one used the offers of the company, and if so, what are your opinions on it?

 

http://www.regenexx....t-outcome-data/

 Yes, I was one of the subjects on the knee trial.

 

They used abdominal fat stem cells.

 

I would have to say it was a complete success.

 

Mike


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#50 seivtcho

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Posted 14 August 2015 - 11:27 AM

Thanks a lot Mike :) It seems, that the therapy works. If not a secret, what can you tell us about the therapy? Any information will be good. How did they took the fat stem cells? Liposuction? Or maybe the simply cut out some subcutaneous fat cells. 



#51 seivtcho

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Posted 14 August 2015 - 06:35 PM

Found a stem cells treatment of MS here

 

http://www.healthlin...bility-012215#1



#52 seivtcho

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Posted 14 August 2015 - 06:40 PM

A web site shows different usages of stem cells by categories


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#53 Juicy

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Posted 30 August 2015 - 01:13 PM

I wonder which exactly procedures did Peter Nygard got


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#54 Lebombo

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Posted 10 September 2015 - 07:31 AM

Hi seivtcho,  

 

As far as the gold standard of stem cells, which are embryonic stem cells, the only FDA approved clinical trial is a treatment you mentioned in post #32 and #13.  The work is being done by world renowned scientist, Robert Lanza.  He working on many stem cell therapies/treatments.  The field of stem cells has been in the research phase for many years and the most promising of the research is just beginning to make it from lab to bedside.  In a few more years, the status of many gold standard stem cell therapies will be more widely known.  The first treatments that will be available are for the eye, such as restoring vision due to retinal disease (for instance AMD, SMD, and MMD).  These will be the first therapies because repairing the eye via stem cells is a less complex task than repairing other parts of the body.  Generating unlimited supplies of universally available blood/platelets will most likely be the next gold standard treatment brought to market.  These cells are also less complex and more safe to differentiate and introduce into the body.  MS and Lupus may soon follow.  Then the floodgates will open for routine stem cell therapies that are highly effective for large varieties of ailments, injuries, disorders, and diseases.  Give it until about 2025 for stem cell therapies to begin maturing.  But don't give up hope.  We will get there.  By the way, I just created a thread titled, "Robert Lanza."  He is a pioneer in the stem cell field.

 

Regards


Edited by Lebombo, 10 September 2015 - 07:32 AM.

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#55 seivtcho

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Posted 10 September 2015 - 02:54 PM

@Lebombo , thank you for joining the topic! Robert Lanza seems to me a great man. Do you know of some stem cells researches made by Robert Lanza, that were tested on people? If you post links to abstracts or eventually free full texts it will be great.



#56 Lebombo

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Posted 10 September 2015 - 07:10 PM

Your welcome seivtcho, here is an article and journal publication of the first and only FDA approved ongoing human clinical trials using human embryonic stem cells. 

 

 

In a report published in the journal Lancet, scientists led by Dr. Robert Lanza, chief scientific officer at Advanced Cell Technology [now called Ocata Therapeutics], provide the first evidence that stem cells from human embryos can be a safe and effective source of therapies for two types of eye diseases—age-related macular degeneration, the most common cause of vision loss in people over age 60, and Stargardt’s macular dystrophy, a rarer, inherited condition that can leave patients legally blind and only able to sense hand motions.

 

The trial is the only one approved by the Food and Drug Administration involving human embryonic stem cells as a treatment.

 

http://time.com/3507...cells-eyesight/

 

 

 

 

And here is the specific journal publication in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine:

Human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelium in patients with age-related macular degeneration and Stargardt's macular dystrophy: follow-up of two open-label phase 1/2 studies

http://www.thelancet...1376-3/abstract

 

 

 


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#57 seivtcho

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Posted 11 September 2015 - 08:40 AM

 Superb! This is what I was thinking sbout when masking this topic. Real stem cells technologies, tried on real people, having a real success. 

 

 I got an idea. Why not we invite stem cells researchers to post abstracts or full textx of their stem cells technologies tried on people. 

 

 Thus it will be easier for us to know about them. 


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#58 alc

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Posted 15 September 2015 - 02:16 AM

Few good places to look at what is happening in this field are:

 

Alliance for Regenerative Medicine (ARM)

 

http://alliancerm.org/

 

California Institute for Regenerative Medicine

 

https://www.cirm.ca.gov/

 

(for example ViaCyte had support from CIRM

 

http://viacyte.com/)

 

Also, look at

 

Mesoblast

 

http://mesoblast.com/

 

Capricor

 

http://capricor.com/#/home

 

 

 

etc.

 

 

As for what is in clinical stage, check out Clinical Trials web site:

 

www.clinicaltrials.gov

 

and just do a search for Stem Cells ... you will get thousands of results. This field is growing very fast.

 

 

 

 

 


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#59 John Schloendorn

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Posted 15 September 2015 - 05:34 AM

comment if you think, that it is not as good as it sounds

 

 

 
Some issues with all of the above:
- The phrase "stem cells" is not defined and used with variable meaning (bait-and-switch tactics).  Often it refers to a thing that would have been called a "plain old cell" 15 years ago. 
- Not all of the above studies even claim to use stem cells
- Few of them try to claim clinical efficacy
- Those that do claim efficacy aren't designed to attribute whatever (semblance of) efficacy they claim to any particular cell type, as opposed to structural aspects of the intervention, like surgery, or scaffolding
- Small study size, usually N = 1 
- When N > 1, no controls are included in the experiment
- No historical controls are reported, such as spontaneous improvement rates, or availability and success rate of state of the art treatment. 
- Generally no mechanistic studies -- efficacy in a vacuum.  If cells are transplanted, do they persist?  If they're endogenous, what are they doing differently?
- ACTC is among the more advanced.  But it's still a phase2a thing.  If this was a regular drug, the chance of these claims to hold up in phase3 would be between negligible and zero... (Feuerstein-Ratain rule)
 
The only therapy I know of that use narrowly defined stem cells that's used on large scale, where the cells persist, and can be demonstrated to underlie the clinical mechanism of efficacy, is in bone-marrow transplantation, for reconstitution after lethal-dose chemotherapy, or correction of genetic diseases (there were some sickle cell links above).  Anything else is just fancy headlines that leave the scientific method far behind as far as I can see. 
 
So in the spirit of the OP, stem cells are certainly being used a lot (as far as people bother to define what a "stem cell" is at all).  But there are hardly any scientific experiments to be found that demonstrate them to work as advertised by the grant writers and penny stock pushers.  There's nothing remotely like evidence of efficacy to the same standard that drugs are being held to.
 

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#60 alc

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Posted 15 September 2015 - 04:26 PM

One blog that I read a lot is Prof. Paul Knopfler @ UC Davis:

 

http://www.ipscell.com

 

He interviews a lot of notable names in this field and related fields: Jennifer Doudna, George Church, Masayo Takahashi, Bob Lanza, Mike West, etc.

 

http://www.ipscell.com/interviews/

 

 


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