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Teeth?

teeth

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14 replies to this topic

#1 A941

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Posted 26 May 2015 - 05:13 AM


Some time ago I read an article about a woman over 100 who sudeenly grew new teeth, and that it was the first reported case of something like that happening.

I dont know if this is true* (i also would have to find the article again) but i remember that a friend of mine told me (back in 1997) that in Bosnia he had a neighbor who was 115 years old, and she too grew a third set of teeth, he described these teeth as "cat like teeth". Back then I thought this was not possible, but now I think he was right.

 

Is there something important, lifextension related we could learn from this?

Does anyone know more about new teeth after the age of 100?

 

As far as I know all the teeth we have are allready there in our jaw when we are born, the first set's roots are "eaten" by white blood cells and the 2nd set breaks through, so where does the third set grow?

The Jaw is fully formed and there is no space left anymore, right?

 

Could this be something that remained from a long time ago when some ancestor (ape like or other) had to grow a third set of teeth to survive?

 

Ideas?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*If it really is the first reported case


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#2 Danail

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Posted 28 July 2015 - 10:01 AM

Docent Ilieva from Bulgaria has a disertation (phd) on aging changes of the face, mouth and teeth. According to her, these are not new grown teeth, bun instead they are impacted teeth, most frequently whisdom teeth, that show in the mouth because of bone degeneration processes.

#3 xEva

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Posted 28 July 2015 - 04:40 PM

A941, I remember that piece, about that just over 100 yo Russian woman. It was reported by Reuters. I remembered the name, Maria Vasilyeva, 'cause it was just like a relative's. You may try to search for it if it's still available online. She did not grow the full third set though but only 3 teeth.

I also saw some other similar reports occasionally, but very rare.

The idea that they may be unerupted impacted teeth makes sense exactly because of the questions you ask.

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#4 zorba990

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Posted 28 July 2015 - 07:30 PM

Perhaos something to do with thymosin up regulation http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/20013654
or a-msh
http://www.longecity...so-where-is-it/

#5 Danail

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Posted 29 July 2015 - 06:52 AM

Unfortunatelly, we people are born with a finite number of germs for teeth (20 residual and 32 permanent teeth, counting the whisdom teeth). No other tooth germs our body can make normally.

 

Whatever you do in order to grow a new tooth, it needs to make the germ for the tooth. So, you need more than thymosin upregulation in order to grow a new tooth.

 

Actually, there are some pathologic conditions, that make our body grow more teeth germs. There are tumors, that can grow a fully developed tooth inside them. They are called teratomas, and there are also people, who are born with more teeth (supernumeric number of teeth, most frequently made by dividing in two of a tooth germ during the early stages of its development). In the case of the teratoma, these tumors usually affect the young, not the very old age. And location of teratomas in the jaw is very rare. They develop completely random tissues inside them, and having a developed tooth in them is rare, even though it is possible. So, it will be an extraordinary small chance a very old person to grow a teratoma, which teratoma to grow a fully developed tooth, and even then the tooth will remain inside the main tumor mass, covered from everywhere with different teratomic tissues. And even in that case it will show in themouth only when being exposed due to degeneration of the jaw bone. In the second case the germs of the supernumeric teeth are formed together with the germs of the normal teeth, and the supernumeric teeth errupt early in life, together with the normal ones. No other tooth germs our body can make. So, in both cases you can not have a normal person growing a normal tooth very late in the life.

 

The only feasible way to see a tooth showing through the mucosa of a very old person is that this tooth has stayed impacted, and starts to show after the bone of the jaws starts to degenerate. 

 

If you want artifitally to grow new teeth, the only way to do that is to build the tooth germ from stem cells, and implant it in the jaws. This has been done on mice.



#6 Antonio2014

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Posted 30 July 2015 - 07:25 AM

My cousin has 2 lines of teeth. The second one grew when he was 12 or so.



#7 Kalliste

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Posted 30 July 2015 - 09:17 AM

Probably no lesson for life extension. We will have stem cell teeth in a few decades. Go in and do a new one or several when needed along with your standard rejuvenation treatment.

In a sense the teeth is on the frontline of regenerative medicine thanks to the art of dentistry. If you grow old and need new teeth that is generally not a big problem except for your economy. 



#8 seivtcho

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Posted 30 July 2015 - 03:33 PM

The speed of the stem cells development depends on us. Research them, and make it happen faster.



#9 xEva

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Posted 30 July 2015 - 04:25 PM

My cousin has 2 lines of teeth. The second one grew when he was 12 or so.


Interesting. How old is your cousin and how many teeth does he have?

Does one of the lines duplicate his "permanent" teeth, or is it "baby" teeth that he retained? Or maybe he has very small jaws that cannot accommodate his teeth in one line and they are so crowded that appear to grow in two rows?

Edited by xEva, 30 July 2015 - 04:26 PM.


#10 Danail

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Posted 30 July 2015 - 07:07 PM

My cousin has 2 lines of teeth. The second one grew when he was 12 or so.

 

At that age most probably your cousin has a residual tooth, that does not want to fall, and the permanent tooth has started to errupt out of place.



#11 Antonio2014

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Posted 31 July 2015 - 08:49 AM

 

My cousin has 2 lines of teeth. The second one grew when he was 12 or so.


Interesting. How old is your cousin and how many teeth does he have?

Does one of the lines duplicate his "permanent" teeth, or is it "baby" teeth that he retained? Or maybe he has very small jaws that cannot accommodate his teeth in one line and they are so crowded that appear to grow in two rows?

 

He is now 41. He had several surgeries to extract the biggest secondary teeth, but still has some (I don't know how many). Both primary and secondary rows are permanent, but the secondary teeth aren't so big. The primary teeth are in the normal position and the teeth that grew later are in the outside and smaller. The bigger secondary teeth were the canines, I think. The molars were small. His brother has normal teeth, and his parents too.


Edited by Antonio2014, 31 July 2015 - 08:49 AM.

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#12 seivtcho

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Posted 31 July 2015 - 09:41 AM

If you ask me, let him keep them as long as possible :)



#13 drtom

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Posted 29 August 2015 - 04:01 PM

The Guinness Book of Records used to list a category for "most sets of teeth".

If I recall correctly (and I may not), it stated that there were many recorded instances in which people had grown a full 3rd set of teeth.

Even more remarkably, there was one recorded set of a 4th dentition (known as "Wison's/Lison's case??). (Sorry; memory is failing me!)

This case was apparently recorded in medical journals and as such

1) is unlikely to be simply late erupting teeth and

2) perhaps it could be found by searching?



#14 xEva

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Posted 07 September 2015 - 03:49 PM

There is nothing of the sort on Guinness site http://www.guinnessworldrecords.com/

could it be that you took the fourth molar for the fourth dentition? It looks like third and fourth molars are not that uncommon. These are extra wisdom teeth -- which should qualify one for the 'most teeth in a mouth' record, still open here: http://www.guinnessw...eeth-in-a-mouth

Better yet @Antonio2014: your cousin should apply for this record, if he has a double set in his mouth :-D

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#15 Multivitz

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Posted 21 December 2015 - 11:10 PM

My dads on his second set of wisdom teeth, his bones are fine.





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