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Why are so few using MELATONIN?


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#1 sub7

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Posted 06 October 2005 - 02:22 AM


As far as I can tell, melatonin is a great nootropic (or if it does not deserve this name, "supplement") to use on a regular basis. It is well studied, has anti-oxidant properties, is cheap, widely available and mostly side effect free. If it makes one sleepy, you can alwyas take it at night...

So why are more people not using it on a regular basis? Am I missing something?

Thanks

Sub7

#2 eternaltraveler

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Posted 06 October 2005 - 02:32 AM

at my age I'm still making plenty naturally and have little trouble sleeping

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#3 biknut

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Posted 06 October 2005 - 03:11 AM

another question is,

what is the best way to get it? straight supplement? hgh secretagogue? or other?

i've read that taking a melatonin supplement won't help much because it can't get past the digestive system very well.

#4 scottl

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Posted 06 October 2005 - 03:56 AM

another question is,

what is the best way to get it?  straight supplement?  hgh  secretagogue?  or other?

i've read that taking a melatonin supplement won't help much because it can't get past the digestive system very well.


Help what? Works well to put me to sleep (though I almost never use it for that--ashwaganda and/or inositol work just fine) so it is getting past my digestive system just fine.

You have some...interesting ideas.

#5 biknut

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Posted 06 October 2005 - 04:23 AM

scotl,

well maybe the melatonin supplement i tried was not a good one or the dose was to small. it didn't really help me sleep much. not on a consistent basis.

#6 jubai

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Posted 06 October 2005 - 12:13 PM

I'm 23, and low doses of melatonin (500mc - 1mg) 3 times a week eventually fucked up my circadian cycle, im better off without it

#7 mnosal

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Posted 06 October 2005 - 12:14 PM

1) You can get Sublingual Melatonin in/at most places that carry the regular pills.

2) The first problem with habitual use, in people who don't have diagnosed disorders concerning Melatonin under/over production, is shutting down the natural production. This is similar to the feedback mechanisms that shut off hormone production when superphysiological doses are used.

Think pineal gland or epiphysis atrophy, if you don't have a daily deficit, the gland won't produce. The result is suppression of natural Melatonin.

2) Sleep induction, by its ability to entrain biological rhythms(circadian rhythm), is not the only function of Melatonin, it has important effects on reproductive function of many animals(possibly human) as well.

While we are not thought of as seasonal breeders but most men/women feel biological urges in the warm months. The effect of melatonin on reproductive systems can be summarized by saying that it is anti-gonadotropic. In other words, melatonin inhibits the secretion of the gonadotropic hormones luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone from the anterior pituitary. Much of this inhibitory effect seems due to inhibition of gonadotropin-releasing hormone from the hypothalamus, which is necessary for secretion of the anterior pituitary hormones.

3) One practical application of melatonin's role in controlling seasonal reproduction is found in its use to artificially manipulate cycles in seasonal breeders. For example, sheep that normally breed only once per year can be induced to have two breeding seasons by treatment with melatonin. While not proven in human trials, this might translate to Human reproductive abnormalities

4) There is some indication that melatonin levels are lower in elderly insomniacs, shift workers and those suffering from "jet lag". Melatonin therapy in such cases appears beneficial in correcting the problem. Bottom line, I'd use caution and take Melatonin only on occassion.


5) It is not just some inocuous sleeping pill as many are told is is. This is a hormone. Long term studies have yet to be done( at least no results put forth yet)



Here is one conservative warning to consider:

"Precautions: There are no known serious side effects to regulated
melatonin supplementation. Some people may experience vivid dreams or
nightmares. Overuse or incorrect use of melatonin could disrupt
circadian rhythms. Long-term effects have not been well studied. In
rats, melatonin decreases T4 and T3 uptake levels. Melatonin can cause drowsiness if taken during the day. If morning drowsiness is experienced after taking melatonin at night, reduce dosage levels.

In some cases of depression, daytime doses of melatonincan increase depression.
May be contraindicated for those with autoimmune disorders and immune system cancers (e.g., lymphoma, leukemia). Because melatonin suppresses corticosteroid activity, those who are taking corticosteroids for anti-inflammatory or immune suppressive purposes (e.g., transplant patients) should exercise caution with melatonin supplementation.

Melatonin could interfere with fertility. It is also contraindicated
during pregnancy and lactation. Lack of sleep and insufficient exposure to darkness may suppressnatural production of melatonin."

Source:
http://www.wellfx.co..._melatonin_.htm
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#8 xanadu

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Posted 06 October 2005 - 11:59 PM

I use melatonin, have for years. They've done numerous studies that showed as people aged, their melatonin levels dropped starting at about age 20 and becoming seriously low in most people by age 40. Old people had the lowest levels. Besides that, it's totally non toxic. I've never seen nor heard of a study showing that taking M. supplements harmed anyone or made them produce less on their own.

#9 purerealm

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Posted 07 October 2005 - 05:06 AM

I went out and bought some melatonin today. I took some and now I'm feeling a bit tired, but comfortable. This is good because I'm a chronic insomniac.

#10 pycnogenol

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Posted 08 October 2005 - 07:13 AM

I take 1/2 of a 300 microgram (0.3 mg) tablet nightly. Taken this amount for 5 years.

#11 sub7

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Posted 08 October 2005 - 05:42 PM

I take 1/2 of a 300 microgram (0.3 mg) tablet nightly. Taken this amount for 5 years.

Can you describe the effects? Easier sleep, longer sleep, more restful sleep, no effect on sleep but a sense of well being....

Thanks
Sub7

#12 isness

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Posted 08 October 2005 - 07:13 PM

I supplement 3mg melatonin a day. It has improved the quality of my life by a lot. Before I suffered from an unidentified sleeping disorder/circadian rhythm disorder.

#13 sub7

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Posted 09 October 2005 - 02:24 AM

I take 1/2 of a 300 microgram (0.3 mg) tablet nightly. Taken this amount for 5 years.


Another member just said 3 mg per day. Canyou please confirm that you are indeed taking half of a 0.3 mg tablet and not half of a 3 mg tab? Half of 0.3 mg sounds way too low to have any kind of effect

Sub7

#14 pycnogenol

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Posted 09 October 2005 - 10:27 PM

Another member just said 3 mg per day. Can you please confirm that you are indeed taking half of a 0.3 mg tablet and not
half of a 3 mg tab? Half of 0.3 mg sounds way too low to have any kind of effect. Sub7


I have a bottle of Melatonin 300 mcg (microgram) and split the pills in half. I only take 150 mcg nightly. I would never take
3 mg nightly as that amount is much too strong for me. 150 mcg per night definitely works for me. I take it for the antioxidant
effects and for restful sleep.

#15 purerealm

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Posted 10 October 2005 - 05:56 AM

What kind of symptoms indicate an amount that is too strong? I think most bottles are 3 mg, with the crease in the center in case you want to take 1.5 mg. I've only tried a 3 mg, and it put me to sleep pretty early.

I'm still not sure how exactly it works though. Does an increase in melatonin levels in the body tell the brain that it is time to sleep? Circadian rhythm reset?

#16 joee

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Posted 10 October 2005 - 04:25 PM

yes- i believe your circadian rhythm is determined by the balance between seratonin/melatonin

more melatonin- sleepy-time, more seratonin, awake

Im not sure how correct this is, but from my (limited) understanding, melatonin is signaled to turn into seratonin in the presence of light in the pineal gland.

Im ceratin there are more factors involved in circadian rhythm, but this is where melatonin plays its role.

I too get melatonin hagovers the next day if I take 3mg- feels almost like a benzodiazapene hangover! My head gets all foggy and I actually feel more prone to depression (I am dysthimic).

After reading this thread the other night, I tried 1mg- I feel asleep a bit earlier, but slept a whole 10 hours whereas I usually do about 7 hours and need 8.

This thread interests me as I am a very light sleeper (Im a bit PTSD'ish- wake up angry and ready to fight with just slight noise) and I live in a dorm. These damned kids dont know how to shut the hell up! :) -and I need my beauty-sleep or Im useless for all the learnin' I need to be doing!

#17 Pablo M

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Posted 10 October 2005 - 06:38 PM

yes- i believe your circadian rhythm is determined by the balance between seratonin/melatonin

more melatonin- sleepy-time, more seratonin, awake

Im not sure how correct this is, but from my (limited) understanding, melatonin is signaled to turn into seratonin in the presence of light in the pineal gland.

Im ceratin there are more factors involved in circadian rhythm, but this is where melatonin plays its role.

I too get melatonin hagovers the next day if I take 3mg- feels almost like a benzodiazapene hangover!  My head gets all foggy and I actually feel more prone to depression (I am dysthimic).

After reading this thread the other night, I tried 1mg- I feel asleep a bit earlier, but slept a whole 10 hours whereas I usually do about 7 hours and need 8.

This thread interests me as I am a very light sleeper (Im a bit PTSD'ish- wake up angry and ready to fight with just slight noise) and I live in a dorm.  These damned kids dont know how to shut the hell up!  :)  -and I need my beauty-sleep or Im useless for all the learnin' I need to be doing!

Actually I believe it is melatonin that is a downstream metabolite of serotonin and not the other way around. Someone correct me if I'm wrong.

Re the possible downregulation of natural production, there was a thread on the LEF forum about this: Webpage. The moderator's comments were:

A perusal of its abstracts and a search of medline failed to find any data re downregulation of endogenous melatonin secondary to melatonin supplementation.



#18 lemon

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Posted 10 October 2005 - 11:51 PM

It is my understanding that a healthy young adult produces about 1 mcg (0.1mg) of melatonin a night. I too have occaisionally taken melatonin when I can't sleep but only 3 mcgs. I find I wake up about three or so hours later.

I generally prefer theanine or, if I'm pulling all the stops out, phenibut when I can't sleep.

#19 rfarris

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Posted 11 October 2005 - 05:03 AM

0.1mg = 100 mcg

#20 purerealm

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Posted 11 October 2005 - 09:19 PM

i was confused with the relationship between melatonin and serotonin myself. But yes, serotonin is the precursor to melatonin.

For you guys with sleeping problems, have you seen these light therapy products?
http://www.apollolight.com/

I just bought one and I hope it works well. My assessment test says I have a severe circadian rhythm disorder

#21 london710

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Posted 20 October 2005 - 01:38 AM

heres some good posts from the sci.life-extension forum. The author takes 30 mg melatonin a night. I might be upping my dose soon too.
comments?

http://groups.google...a51f30857ff?tvc

1. tcart...@elp.rr.com Oct 13, 11:59 pm
Newsgroups: sci.life-extension
From: tcart...@elp.rr.com - Find messages by this author
Date: 13 Oct 2005 15:59:09 -0700
Hi,


Endocrine. 2005 Jul;27(2):131-6. Related Articles, Links
Metabolic effects of melatonin on oxidative stress and diabetes
mellitus.
Nishida S.
Department of Biochemistry, Nihon University School of Medicine, Tokyo
173-8610, Japan.
Melatonin, which is synthesized in the pineal gland and
other tissues, has a variety of physiological, immunological, and
biochemical functions. It is a direct scavenger of free radicals and
has indirect antioxidant effects due to its stimulation of the
expression and activity of antioxidative enzymes such as glutathione
peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase, and NO synthase, in
mammalian cells. Melatonin also reduces serum lipid levels in mammalian
species, and helps to prevent oxidative stress in diabetic subjects.
Long-term melatonin administration to diabetic rats reduced their
hyperlipidemia and hyperinsulinemia, and restored their altered ratios
of polyunsaturated fatty acid in serum and tissues. It was recently
reported that melatonin enhanced insulin-receptor kinase and IRS-1
phosphorylation, suggesting the potential existence of signaling
pathway cross-talk between melatonin and insulin. Because TNF-alpha has
been shown to impair insulin action by suppressing insulin
receptor-tyrosine kinase activity and its IRS-1 tyrosine
phosphorylation in peripheral tissues such as skeletal muscle cells, it
was speculated that melatonin might counteract TNF-alpha-associated
insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. This review will focus on the
physiological and metabolic effects of melatonin and highlight its
potential use for the treatment of cholesterol/lipid and carbohydrate
disorders.
PMID: 16217126
[Highly speculative at this stage, but melatonin should help whether
or not it's "especially" helpful for diabetics or not. Clinical
trials are showing that consistent human benefits start at about the
level of 20 mg/day. I'm now taking 30.]

6. tcart...@elp.rr.com Oct 15, 2:47 am show options

Newsgroups: sci.life-extension
From: tcart...@elp.rr.com - Find messages by this author
Date: 14 Oct 2005 18:47:43 -0700


Hi George,
Twenty mg is a woefully small dose, as seen by the number of
deaths in cancer trials of people who only took this much. With the
decrease of fatalities in these trials, and the fact that absorption
varies by as much as 3500%, we can easily surmise that more lives would
have been saved if larger doses had been used, or if the doctors had
titrated to some given plasma level. Note that I stated the benefits
START at 20 mg. The most successful trial gave 75 mg for six months or
more. It was a contraceptive study. Moderate Alzheimer's effects have
been seen at just 9 mg, a level which is of no value whatsoever for
many. I have yet to see a null study on cancer at 20 mg, but many show
less effect than the ones I post below.
Your recommendation on dosage was initiated at .3 mg by the
man that holds the patent on that dose. Those recommendations are now
badly dated. We live in a medical environment of VERY rapid progress.
The cancer work is on a wide variety of very common cancers,
and makes melatonin the single most effective therapy for cancer
prevention and treatment. Many large trials are ongoing and they could
of course negate or attenuate the current status of melatonin as number
one. Of course it is seldom used at this time, but its use is
increasing at a rapid pace.
A large six year Russian trial gave a 400% reduction in
mortality for the use of two peptides that increase melatonin levels.
Recent work is suggesting that another pineal product given with
melatonin will result in additional benefits. I think a clinical trial
is planned.
In vitro and animal work very strongly supports the clinical
trials, and suggests other benefits such as life extension. 12 of 20
rodent studies showed a life extension of about 20%. Many of the null
studies may have used doses too low or strains of mice that didn't
absorb well.
Anyone who is unconvinced should search this group for
melatonin with my name as author. I've made many fully referenced
posts.


Thomas


According to "Melatonin" (R.J.Reiter + J.Robinson)
``In one study five healthy young people took the same 2mg dose of
Melatonin. Among the participants there was a 35-fold difference
in the amount of melatonin that enters the bloodstream.'' - p.301.
Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2001 Mar;54(3):339-46. (Maybe I should try
sublingual)
J Pineal Res. 2003 Aug;35(1):12-5.


Support Care Cancer. 2002 Mar;10(2):110-6. Epub 2001 Nov 13. Related
Articles, Links
Is there a role for melatonin in supportive care?
Lissoni P.
U.O. di Oncologia Medica e Radioterapia, Ospedale S. Gerardo dei
Tintori, 20052 Monza (MI), Italy. oncolo...@genie.it
Melatonin (MLT) is the main hormone released from the
pineal gland and has proved to have physiological antitumor activity.
MLT has been shown to exert anticancer activity through several
biological mechanisms: antiproliferative action, stimulation of
anticancer immunity, modulation of oncogene expression, and
anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-angiogenic effects. Several
experimental studies have shown that MLT may inhibit cancer cell
growth, and preliminary clinical studies seem to confirm its anticancer
property in humans. In addition, MLT may have other biological effects,
which could be useful in the palliative therapy of cancer, namely
anticachectic, anti-asthenic and thrombopoietic activities. On this
basis, the present clinical investigation was performed in an attempt
at better definition of the therapeutic properties of MLT in human
neoplasms. In a first clinical study, we evaluated the effects of MLT
in a group of 1,440 patients with untreatable advanced solid tumors,
who received supportive care alone or supportive care plus MLT. In a
second study, we evaluated the influence of MLT on the efficacy and
toxicity of chemotherapy in a group of 200 metastatic patients with
chemotherapy-resistant tumor histotype, who were randomized to receive
chemotherapy alone or chemotherapy plus MLT. In both studies, MLT was
given orally at 20 mg/day during the dark period of the day. The
frequency of cachexia, asthenia, thrombocytopenia and lymphocytopenia
was significantly lower in patients treated with MLT than in those who
received supportive care alone. Moreover, the percentage of patients
with disease stabilization and the percentage 1-year survival were both
significantly higher in patients concomitantly treated with MLT than in
those treated with supportive care alone. The objective tumor response
rate was significantly higher in patients treated with chemotherapy
plus MLT than in those treated with chemotherapy alone. Moreover, MLT
induced a significant decline in the frequency of chemotherapy-induced
asthenia, thrombocytopenia, stomatitis, cardiotoxicity and
neurotoxicity. These clinical results demonstrate that the pineal
hormone MLT may be successfully administered in medical oncology in the
supportive care of untreatable advanced cancer patients and for the
prevention of chemotherapy-induced toxicity. PMID: 11862501
---------------------------------------------------------------------------­-----
4: Eur J Cancer. 1999 Nov;35(12):1688-92. Related Articles, Links
Decreased toxicity and increased efficacy of cancer chemotherapy using
the pineal hormone melatonin in metastatic solid tumour patients with
poor clinical status.
Lissoni P, Barni S, Mandala M, Ardizzoia A, Paolorossi F, Vaghi M,
Longarini R, Malugani F, Tancini G.
Division of Radiation Oncology, S. Gerardo Hospital, Monza, Milan,
Italy.
Melatonin (MLT) has been proven to counteract chemotherapy
toxicity, by acting as an anti-oxidant agent, and to promote apoptosis
of cancer cells, so enhancing chemotherapy cytotoxicity. The aim of
this study was to evaluate the effects of concomitant MLT
administration on toxicity and efficacy of several chemotherapeutic
combinations in advanced cancer patients with poor clinical status. The
study included 250 metastatic solid tumour patients (lung cancer, 104;
breast cancer, 77; gastrointestinal tract neoplasms, 42; head and neck
cancers, 27), who were randomized to receive MLT (20 mg/day orally
every day) plus chemotherapy, or chemotherapy alone. Chemotherapy
consisted of cisplatin (CDDP) plus etoposide or gemcitabine alone for
lung cancer, doxorubicin alone, mitoxantrone alone or paclitaxel alone
for breast cancer, 5-FU plus folinic acid for gastro-intestinal tumours
and 5-FU plus CDDP for head and neck cancers. The 1-year survival rate
and the objective tumour regression rate were significantly higher in
patients concomitantly treated with MLT than in those who received
chemotherapy (CT) alone (tumour response rate: 42/124 CT + MLT versus
19/126 CT only, P < 0.001; 1-year survival: 63/124 CT + MLT versus
29/126 CT only, P < 0.001). Moreover, the concomitant administration of
MLT significantly reduced the frequency of thrombocytopenia,
neurotoxicity, cardiotoxicity, stomatitis and asthenia. This study
indicates that the pineal hormone MLT may enhance the efficacy of
chemotherapy and reduce its toxicity, at least in advanced cancer
patients of poor clinical status. PMID: 10674014


Five years survival in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer patients
treated
with chemotherapy alone or chemotherapy and melatonin: a randomized
trial.
Lissoni P, Chilelli M, Villa S, Cerizza L, Tancini G.
Divisione di Radioterapia Oncologica, Ospedale San Gerardo, Monza,
Milan, Italy.
p.liss...@hsgerardo.org
Numerous experimental data have documented the
oncostatic properties of
melatonin. In addition to its potential direct antitumor activity,
melatonin has
proved to modulate the effects of cancer chemotherapy, by enhancing its
therapeutic efficacy and reducing its toxicity. The increase in
chemotherapeutic
efficacy by melatonin may depend on two main mechanisms, namely
prevention of
chemotherapy-induced lymphocyte damage and its antioxidant effect,
which has
been proved to amplify cytotoxic actions of the chemotherapeutic agents
against
cancer cells. However, the clinical results available at present with
melatonin
and chemotherapy in the treatment of human neoplasms are generally
limited to
the evaluation of 1-year survival in patients with very advanced
disease. Thus,
the present study was performed to assess the 5-year survival results
in
metastatic non-small cell lung cancer patients obtained with a
chemotherapeutic
regimen consisting of cisplatin and etoposide, with or without the
concomitant
administration of melatonin (20 mg/day orally in the evening). The
study
included 100 consecutive patients who were randomized to receive
chemotherapy
alone or chemotherapy and melatonin. Both the overall tumor regression
rate and
the 5-year survival results were significantly higher in patients
concomitantly
treated with melatonin. In particular, no patient treated with
chemotherapy
alone was alive after 2 years, whereas a 5-year survival was achieved
in three
of 49 (6%) patients treated with chemotherapy and melatonin. Moreover,
chemotherapy was better tolerated in patients treated with melatonin.
This study
confirms, in a considerable number of patients and for a long follow-up
period,
the possibility to improve the efficacy of chemotherapy in terms of
both
survival and quality of life by a concomitant administration of
melatonin. This
suggests a new biochemotherapeutic strategy in the treatment of human
neoplasms.
PMID: 12823608
[This is one of many positive trials. Click on related articles.]
And none titrated the dosage. Had blood levels been checked at least it
would have been known whether or not nonresponders had good adsorption
or not. And they might well have been able to get much better results
with titration to a given concentration. Are these people incompetent,
or am I missing something?]
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#22 sub7

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Posted 20 October 2005 - 03:24 AM

I had never heard that Melatonin could have such significant anti-cancer properties, just wondering why I never saw that info before. On the other hand 30 mg is really high and I don't know if it would have any serious side effects -not to mention cost will add up, too. Baffled really, don't have an intelligent comment to make here...

#23 oilfieldpilot

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Posted 20 October 2005 - 05:34 PM

LEMON: Can you say what the phenibut does for you? or do you take it just for sleep?

Melatonin rarely works for me, by itself. I'm somewhat similar to SUb7 and purerealm (from other threads) but I've not had much luck with Mel. for any longterm use for sleep. I get best results from Ltheanine (at least so far).
but I think too, I've found a good combo/stack that works for me. I still use the mel, but not for the goal of sleep/health.

I find it interesting the diversity of effects Mel has on people. In another forum (not health-related, really) the use of Mel has another function. But there are same diverse results in people using it. Either it'sthe cat's meow, or just the opposite....and a few in between.

I guess it's back to 'everyone is unique'

good thread great info!

hope you find what works Sub7!

#24 silverneedle

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Posted 27 November 2009 - 11:50 PM

This sounds like alot of trouble ive gone too but recently ive been experimenting
Seeing as the body's own melatonin production is cut out by even tiny amounts of blue light (the eyes have rods,cones and blue light detecting cells that are directly linked to the pineal), ive started useing yellow laquered light bulbs (delivered today) round about, along with wearing blue blocking sunglasses (about a month) at night 2 hrs b4 bed to maximise the amount of melatonin im getting. Also eyeshades to sleep to get full black out. Also darkening tv/monitor at night. I feel much more comfortable with less anxiety straight away with the glasses, and the eyeshades make for deeper sleep when they stay on. This sort of procedure can cure bi polar disorder, though im doing it to see if it helps with plain depression and anxiety through improved sleep quality. I think this may be causing a lowering of libido, considered helpfull for my current circumstances.
A chapter called the watch in a book the wheel of conciousness made me interested in trying this, and then reading about melatonin and evolution in an elegant theory in a book called left in the dark. www.leftinthedark.org -some papers pdfs at bottom of downloads section very technical
see also articles at https://www.lowbluel...ep_research.asp
Blue blocker shades came from http://www.infield-s...t...c1&cid=Mg==
The light bulbs from a google search, not low blue lights dot com
Im going to try some low dose pills of melatonin when they arrive as well. And also a blast of bright light first thing in the morning to wake up.

Edited by silverneedle, 27 November 2009 - 11:53 PM.

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#25 platypus

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Posted 28 November 2009 - 01:08 AM

It is my understanding that a healthy young adult produces about 1 mcg (0.1mg) of melatonin a night. I too have occaisionally taken melatonin when I can't sleep but only 3 mcgs. I find I wake up about three or so hours later.

That's a sign that your dosage is too high. Take less and you'll stay asleep.

#26 medicineman

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Posted 28 November 2009 - 01:19 PM

i still dont see how it is a nootropic though. The definition of a nootropic is obvious to people at this point. Can you point to a study where melatonin has cognitive enhancing properties?

#27 matthias7

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Posted 28 November 2009 - 02:27 PM

I tried time release for the first time 1.5mm.

First attempt was okay. Notable libdo boost. Have another go with a small dose.

#28 Imagination

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Posted 28 November 2009 - 06:44 PM

How is melatonin a nootropic? It helps sleep yes but wouldn't say it has any cognitive benifits, unless you are suffering from lack of sleep.

I take half a 3mg tab every now and again, normally once a week on sunday nights as I have messed up my sleeping pattern over the weekend, when i took the 3mg tab at once, I either woke up an 2 hours later, or was groggy the next day.

#29 matthias7

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Posted 29 November 2009 - 12:59 AM

Sorry I meant 1.5mg! Yes half of a 3mg tablet.

Is melatonin good? Strong anti-cancer properties and considered/rumoured to be involved in neurogenesis. Neurogenesis is the ultimate noot, maybe not immediately but in the long haul - yes.

I've never really looked at it in detail until so this info is just stuff I've heard about.

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#30 matthias7

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Posted 29 November 2009 - 04:07 PM

Okay report.... its good.

Excellent sleep - like superb, feel fantastic. Concerntration focus ... good.

For now I'll stick to weekend use and drop to a 300mcg dose.




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