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The Unessential Diet

polyunsaturated gelatin homocysteine igf-1 anandamide calorie restriction methionine efa diet luigi fontana

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#1 misterE

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Posted 05 December 2015 - 10:44 PM


I came up with the idea after studying the USDA data on the American-diet from 1909 to current. It was clear to me that back in 1909, amongst all the other changes, two really stood out to me. Back in 1909 Americans got most of their protein from plants, mainly grains, potatoes and beans. They did consume animal-protein as well, but the majority was actually from grains. They also got most of their fat from animals, like butter, cream, tallow and lard. As the 21st century progressed Americans shifted their intake of protein from plant-proteins to animal-protein and from animal-fat to plant-fats.

 

I make this point because the consumption of essential-amino-acids (EAAs) and essential-fatty-acids (EFAs) increased greatly during this period. And mimics two falsely made dietary myths; animal-protein is better than plant-protein (complete-protein vs incomplete-protein) and polyunsaturated-fat is better than saturated-fat. Plant-protein is much more “dilute” in EAA concentration or not as complete as animal-proteins. EFAs are only made from plants, so plant-fats like vegetable-oil and margarine contain much more EFAs than animals-fats.

 

Many animal studies have shown that the restriction of EAAs increases the lifespan and longevity of animals. Luigi Frontana; one of the leading researchers into longevity believes that “protein-restriction” is the best way to slow the aging process. The mechanism is believed to be by reducing serum IGF-1 levels, although I have a hard time agreeing with this.

 

Another possible way is that lowering methionine lowers the production of homocysteine; a metabolite that causes endothelial damage, contributing to atherosclerosis; the major killer of westerners. Restriction of the sulfur-containing amino-acids lowers production of sulfuric-acid, which causes acid-reflux and could contribute to calcium-loss (lower bone-mineral density and kidney-stones). The sulfur found in the EAAs also causes bad-breath and stinky flatulence and bowl-movements.

 

In terms of cancer, reducing IGF-1, which rapidly occurs during EAA restriction, will lower the rate of tumor-cell division and growth. IGF-1 also promotes fat-storage within the adipocyte, so fat-loss would also occur.

 

Restriction of EFAs also has been shown to have multiple-benefits. Lowering the intake of linoleic-acid lowers the production of a hormone called anandamide, which alters the body’s way of regulating energy expenditure, leading to obesity and laziness. EFAs are also the building blocks of a wide variety of inflammatory hormones and disease causing hormones like eicosanoids and estrogens.

 

EFAs suppress the immune-system that removes cancer growth and fights infection. Some infections or invasions are not noticed (cold-sores) while some infections are attacked with an inappropriate inflammatory response (psoriasis), this alteration of the immune-system leads to autoimmune-diseases.

 

EFAs also contribute to oxidative stress and the formation of free-radicals due to their molecular-structure. Animal studies have shown that high intakes of EFAs deplete the body of vital antioxidants like vitamin-E. Antioxidants tend to slow the aging process and fight diseases.

 

These are just a few simple example of the danger. I think for a long time many people thought that since EFAs and EAAs are “essential” and cannot be made in the body, that they take on a huge importance. I am of the conclusion that these essential-nutrients are of benefit in small trace amounts and over consumption leads the serious dietary-related diseases. It is also important to note that since these are “essential” nutrients that cannot be made by the body, and can only enter the body from food, it means that diet makes ALL the difference. Exercise, sun-exposure, clean-habbits cannot effect the amount or type of essential-nutrient in the body, the only thing that makes a difference is the food.

 

The Unessential Diet:

 

Since carbohydrates are technically not essential at all, The Unessential Diet should be based on carbohydrates as the main source of energy. Carbohydrates are not essential because the body can make its own. It does this by a process called proteolysis and gluconeogenesis. Both of these processes are intensified and accelerated in disease-states like diabetes, giving rise to the elevated blood-sugar found in diabetics. The best carbohydrate sources would be: flour, potatoes, rice, oats, barley, juice, fruit, sugar and syrups. If too much carbohydrate is eaten, it is converted into unessential-fat.

 

Protein should be low in EAAs, so good choices would be: grains, beans, vegetables and gelatin (an animal-protein lacking EAAs). Meat, milk, fish and eggs should be eaten sparingly due to the high concentration of EAAs.

 

Fat intake should consist of saturated and monounsaturated-fats, and should be low in the polyunsaturated-fats (which are essential). Saturated and monounsaturated-fats are fine to eat because these are the type of fats humans can make themselves from carbohydrates (making them unessential), it is also the main type of fat in human breast-milk. Fats to include would be: butter, cream, tallow, coconut-oil, cocoa-buter and macadamia. Fats to avoid would be: Corn-oil, soybean-oil, walnuts, peanuts, flaxseed-oil, canola-oil, fish-oil etc.   

 

 

These are just some of the ideas I am toying with. This is the result from my current research all combined into one unified dietary plan.


Edited by misterE, 05 December 2015 - 11:40 PM.

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#2 ForeverBulking

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Posted 09 December 2015 - 01:50 PM

Interesting. What do you think of all the studies showing positive cardiovascular benefits when consuming PUFAS over saturated fat? In Denise Minger's newest post she briefly states that people with autoimmune disease (it was a specific one, but I forgot which one and I am too lazy to look it up), managed to put their condition into remission, first, by following a low fat diet, and secondly, by substituting their saturated fat intake with polyunsaturated fat. There is also a bunch of studies that show a decrease in insulin sensitivity when consuming specific saturated fatty acids as opposed to PUFA and MUFA. Are those studies flawed?

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#3 misterE

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Posted 13 December 2015 - 07:37 AM

Interesting.

 

What do you think of all the studies showing positive cardiovascular benefits when consuming PUFAS over saturated fat?

 

 

In Denise Minger's newest post she briefly states that people with autoimmune disease managed to put their condition into remission, first, by following a low fat diet, and secondly, by substituting their saturated fat intake with polyunsaturated fat.

 

 

There is also a bunch of studies that show a decrease in insulin sensitivity when consuming specific saturated fatty acids as opposed to PUFA and MUFA. Are those studies flawed?

 

The "studies" show that saturated-fat increases cholesterol, while PUFAs does not. Of course these studies where done under the "lipid-hypothesis" mindset. Newer research tends to focus on inflammation and oxidative-stress. As far as insulin-sensitivity: all fatty-acids cause insulin-resistance due to their effect on the Randle-cycle. Saturated fats (when outside the adipocytes), do in fact cause insulin-resistance, but they have the added benefits of actually stimulating insulin-release, which overcompensates for the temporary insulin-resistance. Hyperinsulinemia is caused by the stimulation of insulin from increased circulating saturated-fats.


Edited by misterE, 13 December 2015 - 07:38 AM.

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#4 misterE

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Posted 30 January 2019 - 06:14 PM

So I have a recent anecdotal story for y'all.

I befriended a man at my Church who was born in Mexico. He is in his early 80's but easily looks like he is in his early 60's... not only me but other people always comment of his youthfulness and vigor. I was over at his house the other day helping lay a slab of concrete down (he remains very agile and mobile) and I asked him what he ate growing up in Mexico. He said he ate the same thing almost every day. He said his mother would bake homemade french-bread, pinto-beans and boil milk to separate the cream from the liquid. He would then hollow out some of the bread, fill it with pinto-beans and top it with cream. Surprisingly he claims he ate fruit and vegetables when available and meat was only once or twice a month if they could afford it. And this guy looks and acts soooo youthful. He also said he was a pack-a-day smoker for 30 to 40 years. Sounds like despite not living a perfect lifestyle, The Unessential Diet served him well and allowed him to build a body that could withstand abuse... not 100% sure if that is the case, but it was an interesting observation. 

 


Edited by misterE, 30 January 2019 - 06:15 PM.

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Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: polyunsaturated, gelatin, homocysteine, igf-1, anandamide, calorie restriction, methionine, efa, diet, luigi fontana

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