• Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log In with Google      Sign In    
  • Create Account
  LongeCity
              Advocacy & Research for Unlimited Lifespans

Photo
* * * * * 5 votes

C60/EVOO: A polyphenol hypothesis

c60 polyphenol evoo longevity polyphenols olive oil

  • Please log in to reply
212 replies to this topic
⌛⇒ write a quiz!

#1 Turnbuckle

  • Member
  • 3,427 posts
  • 1,374
  • Location:USA
  • NO

Posted 17 March 2016 - 06:15 PM


Hypothesis: In C60/EVOO, the polyphenol content is conferring most of the longevity benefits, while C60 mainly serves to transport polyphenols into mitochondria as adducts.

 

Corollary: Olive oils with low polyphenol content, or those oils that have become rancid, oxidized, exposed to high heat or UV, will be less beneficial, and perhaps even harmful.

 

Evidence:

 

*In the original C60 rat study, fresh EVOO was used and the rats lived 15% longer than the controls without any C60, an impressive result in itself, while attempts to replicate these effects here with C60 in olive oils that are either years old or of unknown pedigree have not produced impressive results, other than an unusual incidence of cancer.

 

*EVOO polyphenols are known to protect against cancer and produce life extension: Xenohormetic and anti-aging activity of secoiridoid polyphenols present in extra virgin olive oil.

 

*In my own experience, old olive oil does not work as well—or at all. For some time I’ve used California Olive Ranch (polyphenol content unknown), and recently they’ve begun to put the harvest date on the bottle. The last bottle I bought a couple of months ago was harvested in 2014, which made we wonder about the oil I used in my last mix of C60, which had no date and worked only poorly. So exactly how old was it? Three years? To try a fresher oil, I bought a bottle of mid 2015 harvest oil from a local olive oil shop with a polyphenol content of 432, and this proved far superior. My skin looked enormously better after 24 hours from a single dose. I wanted to try even fresher oil, so I ordered an oil harvested in November of 2015 with a polyphenol content of 608 (Pruneti Frantoio). Again, I found this even better. My next step—in the works—is a mix using an October 2015 oil with a polyphenol content of 917 (De Carlo Tenuta Torre di Mossa). I will report on this in the coming weeks.

 

Notes: More than 60% of olive oil in the US is adulterated with cheaper oils. Thus even well known brands may have much less polyphenols than expected. All of the olive oils listed above have less than one gram per liter when tested, and likely have even less when used due to aging. Worse, only a portion will be the polyphenols conferring this life extension effect. But hopefully, once the active polyphenol(s) is identified—assuming this hypothesis is correct—I imagine it could be reacted with C60 and sold in rather small capsules.

 

 


  • like x 6
  • unsure x 2
  • Dangerous, Irresponsible x 2
  • Well Written x 1
  • dislike x 1
  • Enjoying the show x 1
  • Informative x 1

#2 Turnbuckle

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • 3,427 posts
  • 1,374
  • Location:USA
  • NO

Posted 20 March 2016 - 03:49 PM

Another data point--adding hydroxytyrosol to EVOO to artificially increase its natural phenolic content. 

 

I first tried a dose of 50 mg hydroxytyrosol without olive oil and found that it gave me a definite boost after about half an hour. While running, I found breathing to be even lighter than with C60EVOO, though this may be an additive effect as I took a dose of C60EVOO several days ago. Next step is to mix it in with already prepared C60/EVOO, and then separately to co-mix it with C60 into a new batch. We'll see if it is soluble enough--the oil solubility isn't high unless it forms adducts with C60.

 

Hydroxytyrosol is known to have life extension properties for cultured cells--

 

 

Chronological lifespan (CLS) is defined as the duration of quiescence in which normal cells retain the capacity to reenter the proliferative cycle. This study investigates whether hydroxytyrosol (HT), a naturally occurring polyphenol found in olives, extends CLS in normal human fibroblasts (NHFs). Quiescent NHFs cultured for a long duration (30–60 days) lose their capacity to repopulate. Approximately 60% of these cells exit the cell cycle permanently; a significant increase in the doubling time of the cell population was observed. CLS was extended in quiescent NHFs that were cultured in the presence of HT for 30–60 days. HT-induced extension of CLS was associated with an approximately 3-fold increase in manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity while there was no change in copper–zinc superoxide dismutase, catalase, or glutathione peroxidase protein levels. Quiescent NHFs overexpressing a dominant-negative mutant form of MnSOD failed to extend CLS. HT suppressed age-associated increase in mitochondrial ROS levels. Results from spectroscopy assays indicate that HT in the presence of peroxidases can undergo catechol–semiquinone–quinone redox cycling generating superoxide, which in a cellular context can activate the antioxidant system, e.g., MnSOD expression. These results demonstrate that HT extends CLS by increasing MnSOD activity and decreasing age-associated mitochondrial reactive oxygen species accumulation.

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC3260369/

 

 


  • Informative x 3
  • unsure x 1
  • like x 1

Click HERE to rent this advertising spot for C60 HEALTH to support Longecity (this will replace the google ad above).

#3 stefan_001

  • Guest
  • 1,020 posts
  • 201
  • Location:Munich

Posted 20 March 2016 - 09:04 PM

That is an interesting theory. What would be a good test or biomarker using Arbequina, Picudo, Taggiasca on one side with <300 total phenols and high polyphenoil on the other side like olio23.com which claims phenols of 1191 mg/Kg?


Edited by stefan_001, 20 March 2016 - 09:24 PM.


#4 Turnbuckle

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • 3,427 posts
  • 1,374
  • Location:USA
  • NO

Posted 20 March 2016 - 10:48 PM

I wouldn't buy from olio23. Look at their harvest date--Nov. 2014. 

 

Olive Varietal: Coratina
Region: Puglia
Harvest: Nov. 2014
Milled within 12 hours of Harvest
Extraction Method:
2 phase, Continuous 
Extraction Temp: 23c (73.4*f)
Acidity: 0.2%
Peroxide level: 6.1 meq O2/Kg
Total Phenols: 1191 mg/Kg

 

 

 
As for a test for the efficacy of C60, that would be great as no one has come up with one yet. There was some discussion beginning on this page (posts beginning with #823) on using breath holding as a measure.

  • Agree x 1

#5 sthira

  • Guest
  • 1,948 posts
  • 385

Posted 21 March 2016 - 01:13 PM

...an October 2015 oil with a polyphenol content of 917 (De Carlo Tenuta Torre di Mossa)...


This alone is a great find. Thank you, Turnbuckle. Fresher harvests still won't be available for a few more months. I've been buying from Amphora Nueva for a few years. So this is a nice alternative with reported better chemistry in oils (if their testing is accurate, that is).

#6 Turnbuckle

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • 3,427 posts
  • 1,374
  • Location:USA
  • NO

Posted 21 March 2016 - 03:58 PM

The trials so far, though subjective, support the OP hypothesis.

 

(1) California Olive Ranch (polyphenol content and age unknown, but probably 2-3 years) .6 mg/ml C60, stirred 5 days

(2) Favalosa (October 2015 harvest, 432 mg/kg polyphenols) .6 mg/ml C60, stirred 5 days

(3) Pruneti Frantoio (November 2015 harvest, 608 mg/kg polyphenols) .6 mg/ml C60, stirred 5 days

(4) Hydroxytyrosol (ProHealth 25 mg caps) 50 mg, no oil

(5) #3 with added hydroxytyrosol (615 mg/kg), stirred for one additional day

(6) #5 with added oleuropein (925 mg/kg), stirred for one additional day

 

For the above trials, 5>4>3>2>1, ranked according to positive effect on exercise.

Number 6 is still in process. Number 4 is the only one where I actually felt something without exercising.

The dose in each case (except #4) was one teaspoon of oil.

 


Edited by Turnbuckle, 21 March 2016 - 04:18 PM.

  • Dangerous, Irresponsible x 1
  • Informative x 1

#7 aaCharley

  • Guest
  • 79 posts
  • 5

Posted 21 March 2016 - 07:48 PM

Turnbuckle,

Do you expect that the additional olive polyphenols, oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol, to be incorporated within the C60 particles?


Edited by aaCharley, 21 March 2016 - 07:50 PM.


#8 Turnbuckle

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • 3,427 posts
  • 1,374
  • Location:USA
  • NO

Posted 21 March 2016 - 08:05 PM

Turnbuckle,

Do you expect that the additional olive polyphenols, oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol, to be incorporated within the C60 particles?

 

Nothing can get into the C60 molecule, but there is plenty of space on the outside for adducts hitching a ride into the mitochondria. So I expect that, insofar as phenolic compounds can react at all, they will react to a greater degree if more is present. This is likely far more advantageous than simply reacting with oleic acid.


Edited by Turnbuckle, 21 March 2016 - 08:16 PM.

  • Disagree x 2
  • Good Point x 1
  • like x 1

#9 Logic

  • Guest
  • 2,647 posts
  • 564
  • Location:Kimberley, South Africa
  • NO

Posted 21 March 2016 - 08:53 PM

An interesting hypothesis Turnnbuckle.  Thx for posting.

Now I'm confused however:

 

Niner posted:

...One of the effects that I like is an immunomodulatory one that controls my eczema better than anything I've ever found, and also improves my breathing.  I noticed that a batch that was poorly stored lost this effect over time, and speculated that it was being destroyed by oxidation, since the oil had been kept in a large partially filled bottle "sealed" with a cork. 

I made a batch using high quality ingredients and excluding air as much as possible.  This batch, to my surprise, had no anti-eczema effect to speak of. 

I made a new batch where I ground the c60 in air, and used the same high quality oil.  It had a little of the effect, but not much. 

I made another batch using a lower quality oil that had been in use for a while, and would be expected to have a much higher level of peroxides than the good oil.  I used the same c60 as the previous batch.  The first thing that I noticed was that the old oil reacted far faster; all solids were gone in three days, while the good oil took two weeks of stirring and still had some small specks.  This new batch appears to have the desired anti-eczema effect, and also feels like the enhanced endurance effect is better.  

 

Recently, Franco Cataldo published a paper on the interaction of c60 with vegetable oils, and said that it goes through a peroxide intermediate.  I think it might be the case that the peroxide reaction is faster, but that there are other possible reactions as well.  It is likely that these other reactions, assuming they exist, result in different products, explaining the different pharmacodynamic effects.  The upshot of all this is that you might be better off using a cheap oil for making c60oo, and using the good oil on your salad and vegetables.

http://www.longecity...ndpost&p=697908

 

Now that contradicts what you said about the fresher oil being more effective..?
I don't know what to make of all this!?

 

 

What about adding Olive Leaf/Extract, high in hydroxytyrosol and other constituents to OO?

https://en.wikipedia.../Hydroxytyrosol

https://examine.com/...e-leaf-extract/

I wonder if a cheap way of creating more effective C60oo might not be to add some olive leaves to the oil first, put that mix in a liquidizer and let it stand for some days, filter and then add the C60..?

Alternately OLE capsules could be emptied into the oil.

 

I must say that adding olive tree leaves to vodka, in a similar process to the above, to make a tincture, works very well for me.

It helps that the olive trees grow on the pavement 20 meters away.

 


  • Informative x 1
  • like x 1

#10 sthira

  • Guest
  • 1,948 posts
  • 385

Posted 21 March 2016 - 09:11 PM

Turnbuckle,
Do you expect that the additional olive polyphenols, oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol, to be incorporated within the C60 particles?


Nothing can get into the C60 molecule, but there is plenty of space on the outside for adducts hitching a ride into the mitochondria. So I expect that, insofar as phenolic compounds can react at all, they will react to a greater degree if more is present. This is likely far more advantageous than simply reacting with oleic acid.

How about dropping some of this into a c60 high poly olive oil? http://www.amazon.co...f/dp/B000PM1LAG

#11 Turnbuckle

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • 3,427 posts
  • 1,374
  • Location:USA
  • NO

Posted 21 March 2016 - 09:29 PM

 

 

Now that contradicts what you said about the fresher oil being more effective..?
I don't know what to make of all this!?

 

 

 

 

Sure, oxygen may speed up the reactions, but then what? It won't stop reacting unless you vacuum it out, and it will go on eating things up. I can't speak to niner's personal experience with his skin, but for me, the fresher and more phenolic rich oil works better for exercise and makes my skin more youthful from oral dosing.


  • Ill informed x 1
  • Disagree x 1

#12 stefan_001

  • Guest
  • 1,020 posts
  • 201
  • Location:Munich

Posted 21 March 2016 - 09:40 PM



Now that contradicts what you said about the fresher oil being more effective..?
I don't know what to make of all this!?



Sure, oxygen may speed up the reactions, but then what? It won't stop reacting unless you vacuum it out, and it will go on eating things up. I can't speak to niner's personal experience with his skin, but for me, the fresher and more phenolic rich oil works better for exercise and makes my skin more youthful from oral dosing.
Olive oil absorbs well in the skin. So could some topical tests help. Left hand poor quality oil, right hand fresher high quality oil?

#13 bixbyte

  • Guest
  • 552 posts
  • 45
  • Location:End of the Galaxy
  • NO

Posted 21 March 2016 - 10:50 PM

The trials so far, though subjective, support the OP hypothesis.

 

(1) California Olive Ranch (polyphenol content and age unknown, but probably 2-3 years) .6 mg/ml C60, stirred 5 days

(2) Favalosa (October 2015 harvest, 432 mg/kg polyphenols) .6 mg/ml C60, stirred 5 days

(3) Pruneti Frantoio (November 2015 harvest, 608 mg/kg polyphenols) .6 mg/ml C60, stirred 5 days

(4) Hydroxytyrosol (ProHealth 25 mg caps) 50 mg, no oil

(5) #3 with added hydroxytyrosol (615 mg/kg), stirred for one additional day

(6) #5 with added oleuropein (925 mg/kg), stirred for one additional day

 

For the above trials, 5>4>3>2>1, ranked according to positive effect on exercise.

Number 6 is still in process. Number 4 is the only one where I actually felt something without exercising.

The dose in each case (except #4) was one teaspoon of oil.

 

Why not try adding Resveratrol 99% purity into the C60EVOO?

Just curious since you are adding Hydroxytyrosol why not add RES?  

Both of them are antioxidants. 



#14 Turnbuckle

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • 3,427 posts
  • 1,374
  • Location:USA
  • NO

Posted 21 March 2016 - 11:01 PM

 

 

Why not try adding Resveratrol 99% purity into the C60EVOO?

Just curious since you are adding Hydroxytyrosol why not add RES?  

Both of them are antioxidants. 

 

 

 

That would be interesting, as resveratrol is said to increase aerobic capacity in mice, but has failed to do the same for humans.



#15 maxwatt

  • Member, Moderator LeadNavigator
  • 4,911 posts
  • 1,592
  • Location:New York

Posted 22 March 2016 - 01:56 AM

 

 

 

Why not try adding Resveratrol 99% purity into the C60EVOO?

Just curious since you are adding Hydroxytyrosol why not add RES?  

Both of them are antioxidants. 

 

 

 

That would be interesting, as resveratrol is said to increase aerobic capacity in mice, but has failed to do the same for humans.

 

 

The time period was too short in the study you referenced.  And the subjects were untrained.  There has been an informal test I know of, reported in the resveratrol forum* a few years ago:  A cycling coach noticed and unexpected performance improvement in athletes he was training, and he asked them what they were on.  Resveratrol.    He tried it on himself, taking 500 gram 98% resveratrol daily, for 45 days, measuring his own performance.   The conclusion he drew is resveratrol can improve aerobic performance but only if one is already fit and training like hell.  I know of no formal study in human athletes of similar duration.

 

(Interesting that the Latvian ergogenic drug of choice, meldonium, seems to share many pharmacological properties with resverarol.)

 

* the topic link is here


  • Agree x 2

#16 Turnbuckle

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • 3,427 posts
  • 1,374
  • Location:USA
  • NO

Posted 22 March 2016 - 04:28 AM

 


 

The time period was too short in the study you referenced.  And the subjects were untrained.  There has been an informal test I know of, reported in the resveratrol forum* a few years ago:  A cycling coach noticed and unexpected performance improvement in athletes he was training, and he asked them what they were on.  Resveratrol.    He tried it on himself, taking 500 gram 98% resveratrol daily, for 45 days, measuring his own performance.   The conclusion he drew is resveratrol can improve aerobic performance but only if one is already fit and training like hell.  I know of no formal study in human athletes of similar duration.

 

 

 

 

I did in fact add resveratrol to a C60 mix some years ago, and didn't notice anything at the time. However, I wasn't looking for aerobic effects back then, so I could have missed it. Resveratrol  is not a favorite of mine as it almost crippled me before I discovered I could reverse the joint effects with DHEA, but then DHEA increases my blood pressure dramatically and I already have a problem with hypertension. 



#17 bixbyte

  • Guest
  • 552 posts
  • 45
  • Location:End of the Galaxy
  • NO

Posted 22 March 2016 - 07:15 PM

 

 


 

The time period was too short in the study you referenced.  And the subjects were untrained.  There has been an informal test I know of, reported in the resveratrol forum* a few years ago:  A cycling coach noticed and unexpected performance improvement in athletes he was training, and he asked them what they were on.  Resveratrol.    He tried it on himself, taking 500 gram 98% resveratrol daily, for 45 days, measuring his own performance.   The conclusion he drew is resveratrol can improve aerobic performance but only if one is already fit and training like hell.  I know of no formal study in human athletes of similar duration.

 

 

 

 

I did in fact add resveratrol to a C60 mix some years ago, and didn't notice anything at the time. However, I wasn't looking for aerobic effects back then, so I could have missed it. Resveratrol  is not a favorite of mine as it almost crippled me before I discovered I could reverse the joint effects with DHEA, but then DHEA increases my blood pressure dramatically and I already have a problem with hypertension. 

 

 

After reading your bios, and your situation, I suggest you add Glutathione to your C60evoo?

Also, you might try losing weight and doing heavy cardio exercise to lower your hypertension?

I and my wife dose on 1,000 milligrams of Resveratrol per day and add 500 milligrams of Polydatin 3 X week. Plus 1.5 ml / day of of C60evoo homemade. 

 

 

 

 



#18 Turnbuckle

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • 3,427 posts
  • 1,374
  • Location:USA
  • NO

Posted 22 March 2016 - 07:44 PM

The trials so far, though subjective, support the OP hypothesis.

 

(1) California Olive Ranch (polyphenol content and age unknown, but probably 2-3 years) .6 mg/ml C60, stirred 5 days

(2) Favalosa (October 2015 harvest, 432 mg/kg polyphenols) .6 mg/ml C60, stirred 5 days

(3) Pruneti Frantoio (November 2015 harvest, 608 mg/kg polyphenols) .6 mg/ml C60, stirred 5 days

(4) Hydroxytyrosol (ProHealth 25 mg caps) 50 mg, no oil

(5) #3 with added hydroxytyrosol (615 mg/kg), stirred for one additional day

(6) #5 with added oleuropein (925 mg/kg), stirred for one additional day

 

For the above trials, 5>4>3>2>1, ranked according to positive effect on exercise.

Number 6 is still in process. Number 4 is the only one where I actually felt something without exercising.

The dose in each case (except #4) was one teaspoon of oil.

 

 

For aerobic exercise, #6 was not any better than #5, and may have been worse. Also, after a long run, I came home and fell asleep for a couple of hours--the sleep of the dead. This was unusual, and upon waking, my BP was lower than usual--systolic around 110. Previously I had found that oleuropein would bring down my BP, especially if I took 150 mg and this would work even better with a couple of grams of taurine, but the effect would only last a few hours. Here there was no taurine and the oleuropein in the teaspoon olive oil dose amounted to only 4 mg, so apparently C60 potentiated it. While this may be interesting, I'm not going to pursue it at the moment. Instead I will look more closely at hydroxytyrosol, as it seems to be an active ingredient, if not the active ingredient for the effect people see on exercise with C60EVOO.


Edited by Turnbuckle, 22 March 2016 - 08:24 PM.


#19 stefan_001

  • Guest
  • 1,020 posts
  • 201
  • Location:Munich

Posted 22 March 2016 - 09:02 PM

Coming back to the theory, what happens in the cell when the C60 + polyphenol adducts.have arrived? Does the entire structure behave like a multiple purpose polyphenols? Do the polyphenol get split off and C60 does its ROS scavenging?



#20 Turnbuckle

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • 3,427 posts
  • 1,374
  • Location:USA
  • NO

Posted 22 March 2016 - 10:12 PM

Coming back to the theory, what happens in the cell when the C60 + polyphenol adducts.have arrived? Does the entire structure behave like a multiple purpose polyphenols? Do the polyphenol get split off and C60 does its ROS scavenging?

 

The hypothesis is that we've been looking at this backwards. C60 isn't being delivered to the mitochondria by olive oil, rather, C60 is delivering some component of olive oil to mitochondria. Precisely what happens then is unknown. The components could be active even as adducts, or could be active after being stripped off.

 

Here's a paper discussing mitochondrial targeting--Targeting antioxidants to mitochondria: A new therapeutic direction--what C60 appears to be doing, though it may itself have some other function. 

 

Research shows that hydroxytyrosol is greatly beneficial to mitochondria during exercise (both by acting as an antioxidant and by promoting "dynamic remodeling"), and has poor bioavailability. But if you take a big enough dose, enough will get through to do the job and hopefully there will be no side effects (doesn't seem to be any of significance). So here's another corollary to the phenol hypothesis: hydroxytyrosol alone will increase longevity.

 

And finally, here is a patent application claiming that hydroxytyrosol promotes the differentiation of stem cells (in this case satellite cells)--

 

1. A method of maintaining or increasing muscle differentiation or regeneration after strenuous physical exercise or under conditions where muscle is chronically inflammed, comprising administering an effective amount of hydroxytyrosol (HT) to a mammal, and observing a muscle differentiation effect.

 


  • like x 2

#21 MacTum

  • Guest
  • 4 posts
  • 2
  • Location:Sydney
  • NO

Posted 23 March 2016 - 10:52 AM


hydroxytyrosol

 

 

 

Where do you get yours and what form? Did you just open the ProHealth 25 mg caps?



#22 Logic

  • Guest
  • 2,647 posts
  • 564
  • Location:Kimberley, South Africa
  • NO

Posted 23 March 2016 - 01:34 PM

Olive leaf, olive oil and the Eczema, pathogen, leaky gut connection: (Niner)
http://www.progressi...-dermatitis.htm (referenced)
 
http://www.naturalhe...ve_leaves.html/ (referenced)
http://www.nutraingr...s-bone-benefits (referenced)

NB the anti bad gut bacteria, antiviral, pro bone/stem cell etc effects linked above.
This will lead to a less 'dysbiotic', leaky gut = less NF-kB/inflammation systemically = more telomerase, for stem and immune sys especially, and a more youthful environment for cells.
The Luteolin in OLE should further decrease NF-kB/inflammation by inhibiting early, mid and late stage AGE formation:
 http://www.longecity...ndpost&p=691041
So OLE/OO starts working at the 'root', so to speak.
 
Then 

...Peak oleuropein concentrations in plasma were greater following ingestion of liquid than capsule preparations (0.47 versus 2.74 ng/mL; p = 0.004), but no such effect was observed for peak concentrations of conjugated (sulfated and glucuronidated) hydroxytyrosol...
http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/23766098


So OO being a 'liquid' may get systemic concentrations of oleuropein higher than otherwise?

 

C60 getting un-metabolised hydroxytyrosol into cells and mitochondria is a very good hypothesis IMHO, but how would it do so?

I plan to experiment with:

  • Adding Olive leaves to OO, liquidising and letting the leaf components dissolve?
  • Adding OLE tincture to OO and letting the leaf components dissolve into the OO hopefully? (The oil should float on the water/alcohol after standing for a while, making it easy to separate out, but I worry about the effect of alcohol on the OO?)
  • I will try the above with and without adding C60, as usual, afterward, but a n=1 experiment won't be very helpful... Anyone?

Edited by Logic, 23 March 2016 - 01:36 PM.


#23 bixbyte

  • Guest
  • 552 posts
  • 45
  • Location:End of the Galaxy
  • NO

Posted 23 March 2016 - 01:45 PM

http://www.swansonvi... hydroxytyrosol

 

SWH238.png

Maximum Strength Olive Leaf Extract
  • High-powered antioxidant defense against free radicals

  • The most powerful natural antioxidant known to modern nutritional science

  • Features Olea25™ standardized to 25% hydroxytyrosol

 



#24 Logic

  • Guest
  • 2,647 posts
  • 564
  • Location:Kimberley, South Africa
  • NO

Posted 23 March 2016 - 02:09 PM

It seems Oleuropein is converted into Hydroxytyrosol by gut bacteria?
 

Bioconversion of oleuropein to hydroxytyrosol by lactic acid bacteria.

The aim of this work is to study the conversion of oleuropein-a polyphenol present in olives and olive oil by-products-into hydroxytyrosol, a polyphenol with antioxidant and antibacterial properties. The hydrolysis reaction is performed by lactic acid bacteria. Six bacterial strains (Lactobacillus plantarum 6907, Lactobacillus paracasei 9192, Lactobacillus casei, Bifidobacterium lactis BO, Enterococcus faecium 32, Lactobacillus LAFTI 10) were tested under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The oleuropein degradation and hydroxytyrosol formation were monitored by HPLC. Results showed that oleuropein could be successfully converted into hydroxytyrosol. The most effective strain was Lactobacillus plantarum 6907, with a reaction yield of hydroxytyrosol of about 30 %. Different reaction mechanisms were observed for different microorganisms; a different yield was observed for Lactobacillus paracasei 9192 under aerobic or anaerobic conditions and an intermediate metabolite (oleuropein aglycone) was detected for Lactobacillus paracasei 9192 and Lactobacillus plantarum 6907 only. This study could have significant applications, as this reaction can be used to increase the value of olive oil by-products and/or to improve the taste of unripe olives.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/22806118

 

I have not checked if those strains are common in the human gut?

What effect would gut bacteria have on oleuropein, hydroxytyrosol etc 'dissolved in OO..?
For that matter; what effect does c60/C600oo have in/on the gut I wonder?


Edited by Logic, 23 March 2016 - 02:13 PM.


#25 Logic

  • Guest
  • 2,647 posts
  • 564
  • Location:Kimberley, South Africa
  • NO

Posted 23 March 2016 - 03:41 PM

Oleocanthal, a Phenolic Derived from Virgin Olive Oil: A Review of the Beneficial Effects on Inflammatory Disease

  • oleocanthal not only mimics the mode of ibuprofen inflammatory activity, but inhibits COX 1 and COX 2 enzymes significantly more at equimolar concentrations...
  • This adds further weight to oleocanthal as a potential factor in the health benefits associated with a traditional Mediterranean Diet. Assuming approximately 70% absorption, then 50 mL/day [Olive oil] corresponds to approximately 10% the current Ibuprofen pain relieving dose...
  • The inflammatory enzymes attenuated by oleocanthal, COX 1 and COX 2, are responsible for the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins and thromboxane, which are produced in response to inflammatory or toxic stimuli...
  • oleocanthal encourages cell apoptosis by activating caspase-3 and poly-adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase, phosphorylates p53...
  • unusual effect of oleocanthal on heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) [49]. Hsp90 is a chaperone protein that stabilizes a number of proteins that are required for tumor growth. Therefore Hsp90 inhibitors are investigated as anti-cancer drugs...oleocanthal significantly reduce two Hsp90 proteins, Akt and Cdk4 without actually influencing Hsp90 regulation...
  • Furthermore oleocanthal had a pro-apoptotic effect on cancer cells...
  • oleocanthal inhibits NO production in J774 macrophages and inhibits both IL-6 and MIP-1α in both ATDC5 chrondocytes and J774 macrophages [57]. These inflammatory cytokines are both implicated in the inflammatory process and cartilage destruction of inflammatory arthropathies...
  • oleocanthal decreased expression of other pro-inflammatory markers Interleukin 1 (IL-1), tumour neurosis Factor (TNFα), and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CFS)...
  • oleocanthal inhibits tau fibrillization in vitro by forming an adduct with PHF6 peptide. PHF6, is a VQIXXK motif that resides in the microtubule binding region [59]. Common lesions that are observed in neuro-degenerative disease (i.e., Alzheimer’s disease) are hyperphosphorylated tangles of tau and the PHF6 peptide enables the phosphorylation of tau. Therefore as oleocanthal modifies the PHF6 peptide it then disturbs tau-tau interaction and the subsequent fibril formation.
  • the mechanism by which oleocanthal reacts with the tau protein ...covalently modifies the construct of tau referred to as K18 in biologically relevant conditions. Oleocanthal cross linked with two lysine residues and the end result was the rearrangement of the skeleton producing a more stable piridinium like complex...
  • Derived from Aβ are diffusible ligands (ADDLs) which are neurotoxic factors believed to initiate the onset of Alzheimer’s disease. In vitro evidence suggests that oleocanthal alters the structure of ADDLs and augments antibody clearance of ADDLs, therefore protecting hippocampal neurons from ADDL toxicity...
  • in vivo data indicating that oleocanthal enhances the clearance of Aβ by up regulating P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and also LDL lipoprotein receptor related protein-1 (LRPI)...

http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC4139846/

 

These effects, and their downstream effects, are familiar to anyone who has been following C60oo's anecdotal reports etc.

Perhaps C60 most enhances the bioavailability of Oleocanthal?

 

Could C60 be binding to the same point in the Oleocanthal, hydroxytyrosol, etc molecules that is normally bound to by the substances that metabolise them...?

 


  • WellResearched x 1

#26 Turnbuckle

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • 3,427 posts
  • 1,374
  • Location:USA
  • NO

Posted 23 March 2016 - 04:26 PM

From post #6--
 
(3) Pruneti Frantoio (November 2015 harvest, 608 mg/kg polyphenols) .6 mg/ml C60, stirred 5 days
...
(5) #3 with added hydroxytyrosol (615 mg/kg), stirred for one additional day

 

 

Another data point--

(7)  #3 with added hydroxytyrosol (1370 mg/kg), stirred for one additional day

 

I couldn't tell the difference between this one and #5 that had half the level of hydroxytyrosol. So perhaps the C60 was already maxed out with adducts. Mixing hydroxytyrosol into the olive oil before the C60 is dissolved (instead of 5 days later) may make it more effective by maximizing the number of hydroxytyrosol adducts compared to other phenols.



#27 stefan_001

  • Guest
  • 1,020 posts
  • 201
  • Location:Munich

Posted 23 March 2016 - 05:27 PM

Oleocanthal, a Phenolic Derived from Virgin Olive Oil: A Review of the Beneficial Effects on Inflammatory Disease

  • oleocanthal not only mimics the mode of ibuprofen inflammatory activity, but inhibits COX 1 and COX 2 enzymes significantly more at equimolar concentrations...
  • This adds further weight to oleocanthal as a potential factor in the health benefits associated with a traditional Mediterranean Diet. Assuming approximately 70% absorption, then 50 mL/day [Olive oil] corresponds to approximately 10% the current Ibuprofen pain relieving dose...
  • The inflammatory enzymes attenuated by oleocanthal, COX 1 and COX 2, are responsible for the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins and thromboxane, which are produced in response to inflammatory or toxic stimuli...
  • oleocanthal encourages cell apoptosis by activating caspase-3 and poly-adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase, phosphorylates p53...
  • unusual effect of oleocanthal on heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) [49]. Hsp90 is a chaperone protein that stabilizes a number of proteins that are required for tumor growth. Therefore Hsp90 inhibitors are investigated as anti-cancer drugs...oleocanthal significantly reduce two Hsp90 proteins, Akt and Cdk4 without actually influencing Hsp90 regulation...
  • Furthermore oleocanthal had a pro-apoptotic effect on cancer cells...
  • oleocanthal inhibits NO production in J774 macrophages and inhibits both IL-6 and MIP-1α in both ATDC5 chrondocytes and J774 macrophages [57]. These inflammatory cytokines are both implicated in the inflammatory process and cartilage destruction of inflammatory arthropathies...
  • oleocanthal decreased expression of other pro-inflammatory markers Interleukin 1 (IL-1), tumour neurosis Factor (TNFα), and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CFS)...
  • oleocanthal inhibits tau fibrillization in vitro by forming an adduct with PHF6 peptide. PHF6, is a VQIXXK motif that resides in the microtubule binding region [59]. Common lesions that are observed in neuro-degenerative disease (i.e., Alzheimer’s disease) are hyperphosphorylated tangles of tau and the PHF6 peptide enables the phosphorylation of tau. Therefore as oleocanthal modifies the PHF6 peptide it then disturbs tau-tau interaction and the subsequent fibril formation.
  • the mechanism by which oleocanthal reacts with the tau protein ...covalently modifies the construct of tau referred to as K18 in biologically relevant conditions. Oleocanthal cross linked with two lysine residues and the end result was the rearrangement of the skeleton producing a more stable piridinium like complex...
  • Derived from Aβ are diffusible ligands (ADDLs) which are neurotoxic factors believed to initiate the onset of Alzheimer’s disease. In vitro evidence suggests that oleocanthal alters the structure of ADDLs and augments antibody clearance of ADDLs, therefore protecting hippocampal neurons from ADDL toxicity...
  • in vivo data indicating that oleocanthal enhances the clearance of Aβ by up regulating P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and also LDL lipoprotein receptor related protein-1 (LRPI)...

http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC4139846/

 

These effects, and their downstream effects, are familiar to anyone who has been following C60oo's anecdotal reports etc.

Perhaps C60 most enhances the bioavailability of Oleocanthal?

 

Could C60 be binding to the same point in the Oleocanthal, hydroxytyrosol, etc molecules that is normally bound to by the substances that metabolise them...?

 

Perhaps somebody should ask Moussa what olive oil he used to find out did it have a high concentration of oleocanthal:

The oleocanthal was puncturing the vesicles inside the cancer cells that store the cell’s waste. These vesicles, known as lysosomes are larger in cancer cells than in healthy cells, and they contain a lot of waste. “Once you open one of those things, all hell breaks loose,” Breslin said.

But oleocanthal didn’t harm healthy cells, the researchers found. It merely stopped their life cycles temporarily — “put them to sleep,” Breslin said. After a day, the healthy cells resumed their cycles.

The researchers say the logical next step is to go beyond laboratory conditions and show that oleocanthal can kill cancer cells and shrink tumors in living animals. “We also need to understand why it is that cancerous cells are more sensitive to oleocanthal than non-cancerous cells,” Foster said.


 


  • like x 2

#28 Turnbuckle

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • 3,427 posts
  • 1,374
  • Location:USA
  • NO

Posted 23 March 2016 - 07:08 PM

Perhaps somebody should ask Moussa what olive oil he used to find out did it have a high concentration of oleocanthal:

 

 

In his rat/C60 paper, Moussa says "Virgin olive oil is obtained from a Chemlali Boughrara cultivar from Tunisia planted in the Sahel area", and cites this paper--"Compositional quality of virgin olive oils from cultivars introduced in Tunisian arid zones in comparison to Chemlali cultivars," the abstract of which suggests that these oils have a low phenolic content, but a high E content--

 

Coratina was noteworthy for its higher content of phenolic compounds (287.8 mg kg−1), oil content (42.4%) and P/S ratio (4.7%). Although their low phenol contents, autochthonous cultivars presented high contents of α-tocopherol (577.8 and 434.6 mg kg−1 for Chemlali Boughrara and Chemlali Zarzis, respectively) except for Chemlali Sfax. http://www.sciencedi...304423809005342

 

For these oils, 287 mg/kg phenolics was considered high, and Chemlali Boughrara was less than that. It does have high E, however, and another paper reports an increase in mice longevity of 15% for lifelong E supplementation, which is the same increase for Moussa's olive-oil-only rats, though Moussa's rats were dosed over a much shorter period.


  • Informative x 3

#29 YOLF

  • Location:Delaware Delawhere, Delahere, Delathere!

Posted 25 March 2016 - 12:19 AM

We should start a study proposal thread and do some combination research with C60 and olive leaf extracts and other such things and see what kind of results it produces.


  • Agree x 2

⌛⇒ write a quiz!

#30 zorba990

  • Guest
  • 1,351 posts
  • 200

Posted 25 March 2016 - 01:58 AM

very curious about green olive oils as well and if chlorophyll is a factor here
https://www.barianio...irgin-olive-oil
although I wouldnwait for 2016 on that one....

Light-harvesting chlorophyll pigments enable mammalian mitochondria to capture photonic energy and produce ATP
Chen Xu, Junhua Zhang, Doina M. Mihai, Ilyas Washington
http://jcs.biologist...ntent/127/2/388
  • Informative x 2
  • like x 1





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: c60, polyphenol, evoo, longevity, polyphenols, olive oil

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users