• Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log In with Google      Sign In    
  • Create Account
  LongeCity
              Advocacy & Research for Unlimited Lifespans

Photo
- - - - -

Best Method for Mixing Powders Into Single Supplement?

amino aminoacid bcaa mixing powder custom customize

  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 pone11

  • Guest
  • 654 posts
  • 155
  • Location:Western US
  • NO

Posted 28 March 2017 - 12:37 AM


I want to create my own custom amino acid supplement by mixing in powders that are the pure form of each amino acid and then blending them together.   What is the best way to blend the powders to ensure a homogenous distribution?

 

I was thinking I could use the dough mixing attachment on a large food processor.   I'm not clear on how much time the mixing would take.

 

Is there another piece of equipment or method I should consider?



#2 Oakman

  • Member
  • 1,170 posts
  • 1,518
  • Location:CO

Posted 28 March 2017 - 09:12 PM

I am about to do something like the same thing, but on a smaller scale, and plan a batch approach. For example, a "0" size capsule may hold say approx 500mg (varies 400mg-800mg depending on product density). So I want to produce 100 capsules, so I need 50 grams of mixture to encapsulate. I calculate the proportions of the mixture based on weight, e.g., perhaps a three way mixture of 30g/50g/20g, so weigh that out, place mixture in a Magic Bullet mix jar, and give it a short burst, say 5 secs. Presto, all done.

 

Luckily, I have one of these, it was about $30 on sale, but more importantly, it comes with a small (1.5 cup) mix jar (among others) and so the ingredients are nicely blended without waste and ready to use in an encapsulation machine or to be done manually.

 

For your purpose, it comes with a larger size, I think its about 3 cups, or you could get one of their larger models that hold more.


Edited by Oakman, 28 March 2017 - 09:18 PM.

  • unsure x 1
  • Cheerful x 1

sponsored ad

  • Advert
Click HERE to rent this advertising spot for SUPPLEMENTS (in thread) to support LongeCity (this will replace the google ad above).

#3 pone11

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 654 posts
  • 155
  • Location:Western US
  • NO

Posted 29 March 2017 - 12:28 PM

I am about to do something like the same thing, but on a smaller scale, and plan a batch approach. For example, a "0" size capsule may hold say approx 500mg (varies 400mg-800mg depending on product density). So I want to produce 100 capsules, so I need 50 grams of mixture to encapsulate. I calculate the proportions of the mixture based on weight, e.g., perhaps a three way mixture of 30g/50g/20g, so weigh that out, place mixture in a Magic Bullet mix jar, and give it a short burst, say 5 secs. Presto, all done.

 

Luckily, I have one of these, it was about $30 on sale, but more importantly, it comes with a small (1.5 cup) mix jar (among others) and so the ingredients are nicely blended without waste and ready to use in an encapsulation machine or to be done manually.

 

For your purpose, it comes with a larger size, I think its about 3 cups, or you could get one of their larger models that hold more.

 

How do you guarantee the homogeneity of the mixture?    I would also worry about a high-speed blend potentially overheating the powder.

 

I was hoping to find a gentle kneading accessory for a blender that would continuously stir the flour at a slow speed.   I believe I have an Indian stone grinder that I use for making macadamia butter and I believe it may have an accessory for slow turning flour, but I have never used it and I am not sure how practical it is.

 

One question I have on this project is where can I find a safe digestible filler that is colored?  I could mix that in with the white powder and it would instantly give visual clues about how homogenous the mixture was.

 

In my case, I am going to leave the final product as powder, and I will just mix it into liquids using teaspoons.


Edited by pone11, 29 March 2017 - 12:30 PM.


#4 Oakman

  • Member
  • 1,170 posts
  • 1,518
  • Location:CO

Posted 29 March 2017 - 05:45 PM

Good points. The 5 sec hi-speed blend I intend to use I don't believe is long enough to do any damage, at least for a small batch. If you do a much larger batches, probably a food processor might be better, as you mentioned, due to the need for longer mixing, and that you can use a much slower speed.

 

As for a colored powder to use, I would suggest curcumin. It's bright yellow, relatively cheap, and so would be easy to check for overall homogeneity while mixing in a clear container. BTW, that's a cool idea, and I think I use it in my mix to do the same thing. I was wondering a simple way to check how good a mix I was getting :) .



#5 aconita

  • Guest
  • 1,389 posts
  • 278
  • Location:Italy
  • NO

Posted 29 March 2017 - 09:55 PM

A blender doesn't mix powders at all.

 

We are talking about ridiculously small amounts here, get real, grab a spoon and just stir for a while, no need to over complicate things really. 


  • Good Point x 3
  • Agree x 1

#6 Oakman

  • Member
  • 1,170 posts
  • 1,518
  • Location:CO

Posted 30 March 2017 - 06:58 PM

pone11, MB worked perfectly with a few short 1 second bursts. Totally homogenous, and easy to tell, I made a 25 gram batch.

 

aconita, "ridiculously small amounts" are actually the problem. My batch (intended for 8 days), had 11 ingredients, one only 400mg total. Because 400mg in 25g is not much stuff I don't feel the dispersion done just stirring would be sufficient.



#7 aconita

  • Guest
  • 1,389 posts
  • 278
  • Location:Italy
  • NO

Posted 30 March 2017 - 09:22 PM

In order to mix a tiny amount of one component into a much bigger one isn't the machine that ensures homogeneity but the proper method.

 

In your case 400mg has to be mixed with 400mg, the resulting 800mg mixed with 800mg, the resulting 1,6g mixed with 1.6g and so on until all is mixed.

 

That's the proper method.

 

A blender might be able to mix 25g because the amount is so tiny it will all sit by the blades although it doesn't ensure homogeneity when one component is in very tiny amounts compared to the rest... but why bother with a blender?

 

It will take more to clean it afterwards than just use a spoon and guarantee a proper job as above described.

 

Anyway try with larger amounts and you'll see the blender just doesn't work because the blades aren't designed to mix and to do so with powders.



#8 Gravy

  • Guest
  • 12 posts
  • 2
  • Location:USA
  • NO

Posted 05 April 2017 - 10:14 PM

Geometric dilution - 

 

I'm not sure whats the best way to get it evenly into the proper dose for an capsule though. I've done it manually before using micro scoopers if I wanted to add a small amount of powder (~5-10mg) into each capsule. The different powder densities will make it hard to get a proper dose per capsule.



#9 aconita

  • Guest
  • 1,389 posts
  • 278
  • Location:Italy
  • NO

Posted 05 April 2017 - 11:06 PM

The above video shows what I described in my previous post, the process takes less time one may think, grinding in a mortar is recommendable when one of the components tends to clump, otherwise isn't necessary.

 

In order to encapsulate properly the amount of powder necessary to fill up completely the capsule has to be established first, for example typically a 00 capsule holds about 500mg of powder, the exact amount may vary according to specific weight and particle size of the powder.

 

In the case one aim to encapsulate 5-10mg of active a filler is needed.

 

Chose your filler, it can be as simple as sugar, very fine sugar used for cakes toppings is very cheap, ready available, very fine...and no, in those amounts isn't likely to make you diabetic.:)

 

You can choose any other filling if sugar doesn't make you comfortable with, rice flour, maltodextrines, protein powder, etc...

 

Once you have got your chosen filler fill up 10 capsules with it (or what your encapsulating machine holds), pour out the filler from the capsules and weight it, divide it by the number of capsules and you'll know exactly how much filler each capsule holds, of course.

 

Now do your math and weight the amount of filler needed for the amount of capsules you want to make, do your math again and weight the amount of active you need for the same amount of capsules.

 

Now mix the filler and the active as described and shown in the video, the active in such tiny amounts isn't going to change much your calculations.

 

Once ready encapsulate the obtained powder filling up the capsules properly.

 

You can't think to encapsulate just 5mg of powder, it isn't going to work, not with many capsules at least (you might do it for one or very few ones, weighting each time the active with a precise scale but it is tedious and not a smart choice anyway), period.



#10 pone11

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 654 posts
  • 155
  • Location:Western US
  • NO

Posted 15 April 2017 - 07:26 AM

A blender doesn't mix powders at all.

 

We are talking about ridiculously small amounts here, get real, grab a spoon and just stir for a while, no need to over complicate things really. 

 

I am creating a mixture of aminos from nine separate individual amino acids.   The relative quantities of aminos in the final mixture are not the same.   One tsp of each source powder is not the same number of mg of the source amino acid.  

 

To get the correct volume of each of nine amino powders each time you want to consume them would therefore be quite cumbersome.


Edited by pone11, 15 April 2017 - 07:29 AM.


#11 aconita

  • Guest
  • 1,389 posts
  • 278
  • Location:Italy
  • NO

Posted 15 April 2017 - 09:32 AM

If you find too difficult weighting on a scale 9 different powders, pour them in a cup and stir with a spoon than leave alone the do yourself realm, it just isn't for you.



#12 Oakman

  • Member
  • 1,170 posts
  • 1,518
  • Location:CO

Posted 15 April 2017 - 01:26 PM

 

A blender doesn't mix powders at all.

 

We are talking about ridiculously small amounts here, get real, grab a spoon and just stir for a while, no need to over complicate things really. 

 

I am creating a mixture of aminos from nine separate individual amino acids.   The relative quantities of aminos in the final mixture are not the same.   One tsp of each source powder is not the same number of mg of the source amino acid.  

 

To get the correct volume of each of nine amino powders each time you want to consume them would therefore be quite cumbersome.

 

 

I don't understand your problem? Are you looking for equal (or not) volume or equal (or not) weight mixture? For weight, use a scale that has appropriate wight range. For volume, use measuring cup(s) of whatever size. Put in a container. It doesn't get any simpler, does it? Mix and you're done.

 

If I could post my own videos or pictures, I'd show you how easy and quick using the Magic Bullet, and/or with just good shaking (for powder), it is to accomplish what you want.



#13 pone11

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 654 posts
  • 155
  • Location:Western US
  • NO

Posted 24 April 2017 - 04:45 AM

If you find too difficult weighting on a scale 9 different powders, pour them in a cup and stir with a spoon than leave alone the do yourself realm, it just isn't for you.

 

I am mixing together aminos that will be used three times a day.  I want to weigh them on a scale once per month.     I weigh them once.  I mix them once.   Then I can just dish out a few teaspoons a few times per day into liquid, already knowing the mixture in each teaspoon.



sponsored ad

  • Advert
Click HERE to rent this advertising spot for SUPPLEMENTS (in thread) to support LongeCity (this will replace the google ad above).

#14 jwilcox25

  • Guest
  • 75 posts
  • 7

Posted 18 October 2017 - 01:00 PM

I'm curious what amino acid distribution you're going with here.  I was also interested in this, particularly after the Longo paper and reviewing their patent.







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: amino, aminoacid, bcaa, mixing, powder, custom, customize

1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users