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Vitamin C for Brain & Nootropic effect

vitamin c brain nootropic adrenal

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#1 Mr Serendipity

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 10:04 AM


Hey,

 

So I've had a  regime of taking my favourite supplements regularly before going to bed everynight.

 

Zinc (come with small amounts of copper)

Liquid Magnesium

Vitamin E

 

However my brain has still been getting foggy/spaced out, especially in the evenings. So I looked back on all my notes and writings (including on this site). And I forgot, I do suffer from some sort of adrenal fatigue/low cortisol problem. 

 

Examples:

 

1. I have a very low tolerance to stress and caffeine. Caffeine can make me stressed out and emotional very easily.

2. Ashwaganda gives me major brain fog (lowers my cortisol way too much).

3. I have experienced regular aching/tenderness in my kidneys when I've either gone on a keto diet, I've practiced cold showers, I've fasted for long periods, and when I've been drinking alcohol. (All of which are stressful for the adrenal glands)

4. Brain fog in the evening (cortisol dip).

5. I can endure caffeine better when taking vitamin c.

 

Now I haven't experienced these symptoms to a large degree recently, most probably due to my regular supplement regime, and that I avoid stimulants. But I still experience 1 (if I try caffeine) and 4.

 

 

I have another thread here where caffeine's positive effects were greatly enhanced and negative effects greatly reduced, when combining it with large Vitamin C supplementation: http://www.longecity...otropic-effect/

 

I also noted Vitamin C greatly increased my NO production, as evidenced by my increased erections, and research to support this.

 

 

As people know, vitamin C helps the adrenal glands deal with stress.

 

On my other thread, I discovered for the first time (from research), that Vitamin C has an important role in brain function and development.

 

So vitamin C has 2 ways it could possibly cause a nootropic effect:

 

1. Help your adrenal glands deal with stress and give you better cortisol levels. (Low cortisol levels can cause brain fog.)

2. Top up vitamin C in the brain to keep the brain healthy. (One of the research papers said vitamin C highest concentration in the body is in the brain!)

 

 

So the reason for me creating this thread, is to discuss people's brain/mood/nootropic experiences of vitamin C intake, as well as research any research involving brain health and vitamin C. Because I think this is an overlooked vitamin when it comes to the brain, and most people don't know it could help benefit the brain and possibly give a nootropic effect.

 

I've also created this thread for my own rediscovery of vitamin C, and will be adding it regularly to my supplement regime, aiming to introduce doses of of 2g minimum a day, but hopefully more.


Edited by manny, 09 June 2017 - 10:29 AM.

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#2 Mr Serendipity

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 10:14 AM

http://www.scienceda...10715135353.htm

 

Nerve cells in the eye require vitamin C in order to function properly -- a surprising discovery that may mean vitamin C is required elsewhere in the brain for its proper functioning, according to a study by scientists at Oregon Health & Science University recently published in the Journal of Neuroscience.

 

"We found that cells in the retina need to be 'bathed' in relatively high doses of vitamin C, inside and out, to function properly," said Henrique von Gersdorff, Ph.D., a senior scientist at OHSU's Vollum Institute and a co-author of the study. "Because the retina is part of the central nervous system, this suggests there's likely an important role for vitamin C throughout our brains, to a degree we had not realized before."

 

The brain has special receptors, called GABA-type receptors, that help modulate the rapid communication between cells in the brain. GABA receptors in the brain act as an inhibitory "brake" on excitatory neurons in the brain. The OHSU researchers found that these GABA-type receptors in the retinal cells stopped functioning properly when vitamin C was removed.

Because retinal cells are a kind of very accessible brain cell, it's likely that GABA receptors elsewhere in the brain also require vitamin C to function properly, von Gersdorff said. And because vitamin C is a major natural antioxidant, it may be that it essentially 'preserves' the receptors and cells from premature breakdown, von Gersdorff said.

 

The function of vitamin C in the brain is not well understood. In fact, when the human body is deprived of vitamin C, the vitamin stays in the brain longer than anyplace else in the body. "Perhaps the brain is the last place you want to lose vitamin C," von Gersdorff said. The findings also may offer a clue as to why scurvy -- which results from a severe lack of vitamin C -- acts the way it does, von Gersdorff said. One of the common symptoms of scurvy is depression, and that may come from the lack of vitamin C in the brain.

 

The findings could have implications for other diseases, like glaucoma and epilepsy. Both conditions are caused by the dysfunction of nerve cells in the retina and brain that become over excited in part because GABA receptors may not be functioning properly.

 

"For example, maybe a vitamin C-rich diet could be neuroprotective for the retina -- for people who are especially prone to glaucoma," von Gersdorff said. "This is speculative and there is much to learn. But this research provides some important insights and will lead to the generation of new hypotheses and potential treatment strategies."

 

Scientists and students in von Gerdorff's lab in OHSU's Vollum Institute are dedicated to basic neuroscience research. The vitamin C research work was done using goldfish retinas, which have the same overall biological structure as human retinas.

The retina research work was done by Ph.D. student Evan Vickers, working as part of the von Gersdorff lab. The work was in collaboration with Cecilia Calero in the lab of Dr. Daniel J. Calvo from the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina, and Gustavo Cid and Luis Aguayo from the University of Concepcion, Chile.

 

The work was funded by the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Tecnicas (Argentina), the Pew Foundation, the International Brain Research Organization and the National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health.

The study was published online in the June 29 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience, which is the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience

 


Edited by manny, 09 June 2017 - 10:30 AM.

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#3 Mr Serendipity

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 10:18 AM

Vitamin C crosses the blood-brain barrier in the oxidized form through the glucose transporters.

http://www.ncbi.nlm..../pubmed/9389750

 

Vitamin C concentrations in the brain exceed those in blood by 10-fold. In both tissues, the vitamin is present primarily in the reduced form, ascorbic acid. We identified the chemical form of vitamin C that readily crosses the blood-brain barrier, and the mechanism of this process. Ascorbic acid was not able to cross the blood-brain barrier in our studies. In contrast, the oxidized form of vitamin C, dehydroascorbic acid (oxidized ascorbic acid), readily entered the brain and was retained in the brain tissue in the form of ascorbic acid. Transport of dehydroascorbic acid into the brain was inhibited by d-glucose, but not by l-glucose. The facilitative glucose transporter, GLUT1, is expressed on endothelial cells at the blood-brain barrier, and is responsible for glucose entry into the brain. This study provides evidence showing that GLUT1 also transports dehydroascorbic acid into the brain. The findings define the transport of dehydroascorbic acid by GLUT1 as a mechanism by which the brain acquires vitamin C, and point to the oxidation of ascorbic acid as a potentially important regulatory step in accumulation of the vitamin by the brain. These results have implications for increasing antioxidant potential in the central nervous system.

 


Edited by manny, 09 June 2017 - 10:30 AM.

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#4 Mr Serendipity

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 10:26 AM

Does vitamin C deficiency result in impaired brain development in infants?

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/19161672

 

Scurvy, the rare but potentially mortal manifestation of severe and prolonged lack of vitamin C, is often confused with hypovitaminosis C, i.e. the mere definition of vitamin C deficiency. While the latter condition can be diagnosed in millions, the clinical consequences (if they exist) remain largely unknown, since only a tiny fraction of those deficient in vitamin C actually develop clinical scurvy. Is hypovitaminosis C itself a problem at all then? Yes, it may well be in some cases. Recent data from our laboratory suggest that the neonatal brain is particularly susceptible to vitamin C deficiency and that this condition may adversely affect early brain development.

 


Edited by manny, 09 June 2017 - 10:30 AM.

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#5 Mr Serendipity

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 10:32 AM

Foetus Suffers Brain Problems When Mother Lack Vitamin C http://medimoon.com/...lack-vitamin-c/

 

Foetal brain can have severe consequences due to maternal vitamin C deficiency during pregnancy that cannot be reversed by taking vitamin C after birth, according to the latest research published in the journal of Plos One.

 

It is estimated that approximately 10 to 20% adults worldwide are suffering from vitamin C deficiency.

 

“Even marginal vitamin C deficiency in the mother stunts the foetal hippocampus, the important memory centre, by 10-15 per cent, preventing the brain from optimal development,” says Professor Jens Lykkesfeldt. He heads the group of scientists that reached this conclusion by studying pregnant guinea pigs and their pups. Just like humans, guinea pigs cannot produce vitamin C themselves, which is why they were chosen as the model.

 

“We used to think that the mother could protect the baby. Ordinarily there is a selective transport from mother to foetus of the substances the baby needs during pregnancy. However, it now appears that the transport is not sufficient in the case of vitamin C deficiency. Therefore it is extremely important to draw attention to this problem, which potentially can have serious consequences for the children affected,” says Jens Lykkesfeldt.

 

This study has focused on mother’s life style and nutritional status during pregnancy. The damage to the brain of fetus is such that it cannot be recovered even if vitamin C is administered to the baby was said by the researchers.

 

This study was conducted on guinea pig pups by dividing them into two groups. They gave vitamin C to the one group and second group was considered as a control group. Researchers did not found any sign of improvement in pups that were fed vitamin C when the pups were two months old, which corresponds to teenage in humans.

 

Now researchers are trying to investigate that how early in the pregnancy vitamin C affects the brain of foetus.

People with low economic status who eat poorly – and perhaps also smoke – often suffer from vitamin C deficiency. Comparatively speaking, their childrenrisk being born with a poorly developed memory potential. These children may encounter learning problems, and seen in a societal context, history repeats itself because these children find it more difficult to escape the environment into which they are born,” says Jens Lykkesfeldt.

 

He emphasises that if pregnant women eat a varied diet, do not smoke, and for instance take a multi-vitamin tablet daily during pregnancy, there is no reason to fear vitamin C deficiency.

 

“Because it takes so little to avoid vitamin C deficiency, it is my hope that both politicians and the authorities will become aware that this can be a potential problem,” concludes Jens Lykkesfeldt.

 

The funding to this study was provided by the grants from the Danish National Research Council (#FSS271-08-0763) and the LIFEPHARM Centre in Denmark to JL and the Swiss National Science Foundation (310030_120725) to SC.
 

Edited by manny, 09 June 2017 - 10:32 AM.


#6 Mr Serendipity

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 10:38 AM

Maternal Vitamin C Deficiency during Pregnancy Persistently Impairs Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Offspring of Guinea Pigs

http://www.plosone.o...al.pone.0048488

 

While having the highest vitamin C (VitC) concentrations in the body, specific functions of VitC in the brain have only recently been acknowledged. We have shown that postnatal VitC deficiency in guinea pigs causes impairment of hippocampal memory function and leads to 30% less neurons. This study investigates how prenatal VitC deficiency affects postnatal hippocampal development and if any such effect can be reversed by postnatal VitC repletion. Eighty pregnant Dunkin Hartley guinea pig dams were randomized into weight stratified groups receiving High (900 mg) or Low (100 mg) VitC per kg diet. Newborn pups (n = 157) were randomized into a total of four postnatal feeding regimens: High/High (Control); High/Low (Depleted), Low/Low (Deficient); and Low/High (Repleted). Proliferation and migration of newborn cells in the dentate gyrus was assessed by BrdU labeling and hippocampal volumes were determined by stereology. Prenatal VitC deficiency resulted in a significant reduction in postnatal hippocampal volume (P<0.001) which was not reversed by postnatal repletion. There was no difference in postnatal cellular proliferation and survival rates in the hippocampus between dietary groups, however, migration of newborn cells into the granular layer of the hippocampus dentate gyrus was significantly reduced in prenatally deficient animals (P<0.01). We conclude that a prenatal VitC deficiency in guinea pigs leads to persistent impairment of postnatal hippocampal development which is not alleviated by postnatal repletion. Our findings place attention on a yet unrecognized consequence of marginal VitC deficiency during pregnancy.

 


Edited by manny, 09 June 2017 - 10:38 AM.


#7 Mr Serendipity

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 12:20 PM

High-dose ascorbic acid increases intercourse frequency and improves mood: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/12208645

 

High-dose ascorbic acid increases intercourse frequency and improves mood: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

Abstract

 

BACKGROUND:

Ascorbic acid (AA) modulates catecholaminergic activity, decreases stress reactivity, approach anxiety and prolactin release, improves vascular function, and increases oxytocin release. These processes are relevant to sexual behavior and mood.

 

METHODS:

In this randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled 14 day trial of sustained-release AA (42 healthy young adults; 3000 mg/day Cetebe) and placebo (39 healthy young adults), subjects with partners recorded penile-vaginal intercourse (FSI), noncoital partner sex, and masturbation in daily diaries, and also completed the Beck Depression Inventory before and after the trial.

 

RESULTS:

The AA group reported greater FSI (but, as hypothesized, not other sexual behavior) frequency, an effect most prominent in subjects not cohabiting with their sexual partner, and in women. The AA but not placebo group also experienced a decrease in Beck Depression scores.

 

CONCLUSIONS:

AA appears to increase FSI, and the differential benefit to noncohabitants suggests that a central activation or disinhibition, rather than peripheral mechanism may be responsible.

 


Edited by manny, 09 June 2017 - 12:20 PM.

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#8 Mr Serendipity

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 12:31 PM

Highlights of my past written experiences of using Vitamin C with Caffeine combined:

 

 

Ok, I think vitamin c is having an in the background, nootropic effect in my life.

 

For example while at work, my negative inner voice of what I could be doing instead, has lessened. Almost, I don't find work as begrudging as usual.

 

Also I woke up at 3:30am today, though my alarm was set for 4:30am. Not that this means anything. But usually trying to create a productive morning once awoken is quite hard for me. I usually just sit on the computer surfing the net, and realise I wasted my early morning. But today I started practicing the keyboard, and didn't find it tiresome or frustrating for the first 30 mins. Though I've sort of wasted my morning again, and in a sense I don't feel like I have. Infact I've planned out tomorrow morning so I know what I should do, so lets hope I follow it.

 

Basically what I'm trying to say. Is I feel happier and naturally more excited about things and thoughts. Which is naturally giving me the motivation to things, without trying to make myself do them, if you get my drift. I guess it's related to that zen thing I experienced before, but I don't really feel zen. Rather I just feel happier and positive minded.

 

and

 

It was sort of surreal, as my mind was thinking a lot, but was also switching into a Zen like state where I would notice the sharpness and clarity of my surrounding (road signs, the lines on the road, anything lit up basically) and I became very much one with my steering wheal when turning corners and driving in general. But like I said I kept flipping between thinking/automatic driving and then being zen focused on my driving. While in normal circumstances I guess it's sort of the same, but I'm more on the thinking/daydreaming/automation side. And when I do focus on the road (in normal circumstances), the focus isn't the same I achieved last night. The focus last night was more intense, zen like, I moved the wheel to turn the corner and felt part of my actions. Basically I think I achieved a bit of the Flow state last night, i.e. being in the zone.

 

and

 

 

What happened next was nothing short of amazing. I decided to go for a jog at 5am. And when I went for a jog, I didn't end up jogging, I was sprinting, and enjoying it. It was super easy for me to push myself to the limit, and I felt really happy and positive. I also felt really healthy and fit, like I could breath better, and my circulation was much better. Obviously high on adrenaline.

 

Then when I got home. I started doing loads of research on vitamin c. My mind was sharp, clear, and awake. I started emailing my friend about different health things we talk about, this time mainly about vitamin c, my experiences with it recently, and it's research. And I was writing at a super speed with hardly any mistakes. I sent him a looooong email. Then continuing my research, I sent him another two! Then I think either the caffeine was wearing off, or I was on a come down (though I didn't feel like it), and then I got a bit more normal. However remember I was pulling an all nighter.

 

However for at least I'd say, within a 5 hour span, I experienced the power of caffeine on enhancing my motivation, fitness level, mood, and clarity of mind! And all without a comedown or crash. It was amazing.

 

and

 

 

I can honestly say, it buffers the negative effects of caffeine to a large degree, and enhances it's positive effects. My mind feels clearer and more awake, though not as good as the last time I did this.

 
...
 
I would also like to point out that for the high amount of caffeine in my body right now (1 and 1/2 cans of rockstar, roughly 240mg of caffeine), my body/mind is handling it very well. I can still feel I've taken wayyy too much caffeine for optimum performace. However this observation shows me how well my mind/body seems to be handling a caffeine overdose when taken along side with vitamin c. In general vitamin c considerably lowers the caffeine's negative side effects, and is causing me to stay much calmer than I should be. Right now I feel the heat/adrenaline rushing through my body in waves. The pissed off feeling, the lowered tolerance and patience, and me snapping, are just being kept beneath bay thanks to the vitamin c. However this wave feeling of frustration lurking just underneath my skin is not enjoyable; it's just not overcome me like it usually would with this much caffeine/adrenaline in my system, which is really impressive to see. And I'm not a guy prone to wrath or anger; I'm generally quite calm and laid back (but these traits change with large amounts of caffeine/adrenaline in my system).
 
...
 
I think today's observation showed me more of the massive effect of vitamin c's buffering capabilities of too much caffeine

 



#9 Mr Serendipity

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 12:35 PM

Vitamin C function in the brain: vital role of the ascorbate transporter SVCT2.

 

Abstract

 

Ascorbate (vitamin C) is a vital antioxidant molecule in the brain. However, it also has a number of other important functions, participating as a cofactor in several enzyme reactions, including catecholamine synthesis, collagen production, and regulation of HIF-1 alpha. Ascorbate is transported into the brain and neurons via the sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT2), which causes accumulation of ascorbate within cells against a concentration gradient. Dehydroascorbic acid, the oxidized form of ascorbate, is transported via glucose transporters of the GLUT family. Once in cells, it is rapidly reduced to ascorbate. The highest concentrations of ascorbate in the body are found in the brain and in neuroendocrine tissues such as adrenal, although the brain is the most difficult organ to deplete of ascorbate. Combined with regional asymmetry in ascorbate distribution within different brain areas, these facts suggest an important role for ascorbate in the brain. Ascorbate is proposed as a neuromodulator of glutamatergic, dopaminergic, cholinergic, and GABAergic transmission and related behaviors. Neurodegenerative diseases typically involve high levels of oxidative stress and thus ascorbate has been posited to have potential therapeutic roles against ischemic stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease.

 

 


Edited by manny, 09 June 2017 - 12:38 PM.

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#10 Mr Serendipity

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 12:43 PM

200% More Nitric Oxide and lower blood pressure with a Combination of Garlic and Vitamin C
 

Adam Mousa and his team of researchers had a group of men and women with high blood pressure.

They admistered 2 grams of vitamin C (ester C in particular) and 4 garlic tablets (containing 6 mg of allicin and 13.2 mg of alliin) daily to their patients, and examined their blood pressure levels for the next 10 days.

Mousa and his crew also examined how the combination of vitamin C and garlic would impact endolithial nitric oxide output.

Here’s what they found out:

  • The endolethial nitric oxide output actually increased by a staggering 200%.
  • On average the systolic blood pressure dropped from 142 mm to 115 mm.
  • Diastolic Blood pressure decreased from 92 mm to 77 mm on average.

 


Edited by manny, 09 June 2017 - 12:43 PM.


#11 Mr Serendipity

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 12:46 PM

Dopamine-β-Hydroxylase (DBH), Its Cofactors and Other Biochemical Parameters in the Serum of Neurological Patients in Bangladesh

 

Abstract

Dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH) is a neurotransmitter synthesizing enzyme which catalyzes the formation of norepinephrine from dopamine. In this study, we measured the level of DBH activity in the serum of patients of three different age groups (8–14 yrs, 20–40 yrs and 45–60 yrs) suffering from neurological diseases. Serum DBH activity was measured in 38 neurological patients and 38 normal individuals in order to determine significant variables for its potential use to diagnose the neurological patients. It was found that the DBH activity decreased in the patients of all age groups. A considerable decrease in activity was observed in the patients of 8–14 yrs age group (14.2 nmoles/min/ml in patients compared to the normal value of 22.6). A significant decrease in activity was found in the 20–40 yrs age group (23.4 nmoles/min/ml in patients compared to the normal value of 33.0). The decrease in DBH activity was also found in the patients of 45–60 yrs age group but to a lesser extent (26.4 nmoles/min/ml in the patients compared to the normal value of 30.2). The kinetic studies of DBH exhibited an increase of Km value and a decrease in Vmax in the neurological patients. Serum copper and ascorbic acid levels (cofactors of DBH) were found to be decreased in neurological patients and hence are in agreement with the decrease in DBH activity in these patients. Other parameters such as glucose and cholesterol levels increased, protein and zinc levels decreased and ALT, AST, creatinine and urea content remained nearly unchanged in the patients’ serum.

 

 


Edited by manny, 09 June 2017 - 12:47 PM.


#12 Jiminy Glick

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 12:52 AM

Yeah I just bought a big bag of it. It is an anti-histamine so it could be good for anxiety. 


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#13 Mr Serendipity

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 09:51 AM

I don't know about anti-histamine for anxiety.

 

But I found the cure for 99% of my nasal allergies, was to take zinc regularly. I tried everything else, but taking zinc regularly has prevented nearly all my nasal allergies. I can't remember the last time I even sneezed or got a blocked nose. And I use to have life altering bad allergies at one point. It got so bad, that every time I went to bed, my nose would get instantly blocked (I thought it was due to dust mites). I bought an air purifier, I used nasal sprays, I took anti-histamines, none of which helped. It was a living hell, because I found it near impossible to fall asleep until I was totally tired and exhausted that I couldn't stay up any longer and my body automatically switched to breathing through my mouth.

 

Zinc changed all that. However I've taken zinc citrate by itself from myprotein, and I don't get a good effect from it. I took zinc + vitamin c lozenges from holland and barretts, and I start to get weird headaches. But the zinc citrate with a little copper from Higher Nature, works amazingly well with no side effects.

 

The other thing with zinc, is it use to help heal my throat instantly and stop nasal problems when I use smoke. If I didn't take zinc, I'd get a lot of nasal problems and really sore throat from smoking. My body was especially not designed to tolerate smoking. I know people who have smoked for years, who don't take supplements, and they don't suffer from nasal or throat problems due to smoke. Then again I suffered from nasal problems/allergies when I wasn't smoking. Anyway zinc is a staple in my supplement regime now, thank God.

 

 

Now this brings me to vitamin C. I no longer smoke so I can't test this hypothesis, and I don't want to start smoking again to test it. But I do remember, smoking was very stimulating to me (which would give me insomnia), but it also made my brain really dumb, like major brain fog/can't think. And even though zinc helped counter negative effects of smoking in many ways, it did not prevent this dumbness that would come over my brain. Something other people I know who smoked, said it didn't effect their thinking that badly.

 

So now we learn about Vitamin C's importance to the brain, and the brain using vitamin c for various things including as an anti-oxidant/protective. I wonder if the reason smoking affected my brain so badly, was because my vitamin c levels in the brain were lower than optimal. If I had been taking vitamin C regularly and in larger doses, I might have not noticed such a significant brain dumbing effect caused by smoking.


Edited by manny, 10 June 2017 - 10:00 AM.


#14 Mr Serendipity

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 11:09 AM

My Vitamin C Experience Update:

 

So I've been taking vitamin C for the past couple of days, and I've noticed some changes.

 

1. Last night, I fell asleep much quicker than usual.

2. My OCD is improving.

3. My written fluency, brain fog, and energy is improving.

 

 

So let me expand on point 2 first. 

 

Even though I have taken a lot of supplements over the years and settled on the few which have helped me the most. I never could cure my OCD symptoms. In fact everyday, once I leave the house and go to my car, I have the strong urge to go back to check if I've locked the front door (even though it's always locked). And a lot of times I actually go back and check it (I give in to the OCD urge).

 

The same happens when I'm writing something (like posts on these forums). You wouldn't believe how often I go back, reread it, rewrite it, before I go ahead and click the post button.

 

The last significant OCD urge I get, is double, triple, quadruple checking the same thing. It's like my definite yes this is correct, won't process in the brain.

 

However today, the urge to check my front door today and reread rewrite my posts, feel like they've lessened significantly. They have not completely vanished, but have lessened.

 

It would make sense I'm lacking in something, as I've never been able to cure my OCD, though I have cured a lot of other things with my supplement regime. So it's possible vitamin C might be the thing I've been neglecting.  

 

 

Now to point 3. When writing posts, I have not struggled to think as much. I feel like my brain is more clear and my energy is steadier, but my brain is not much more awake.

 

 

There is something else I need to mention as it may relate to lack of vitamin C in my brain, and I will do this by first posting my food allergies:

 

1. I'm lactose intolerant, this just effects my gut (constipation, gut cramps)

2. I'm allergic to egg whites (makes my skin all itchy, have to avoid mayonnaise)

3. I'm allergic to potatoes depending on how they're made (get nausea and painful bloating in my upper chest/throat)

4. I'm allergic to cashew nuts (swelling feeling in my throat)

5. I'm some what gluten intolerant (eating wheat makes me into a complete sissy/bi polar)

 

 

With milk, I just buy lactose free milk. Eggs I avoid. Potatoes only seems to effect me when I make mash. Cashew nuts I avoid.

 

But with gluten, I don't have gut or bloating problems with it, but I have emotional problems with gluten.

 

Every time I ingest a lot of gluten, whether in the form of bread or Indian roti. It's almost like I become a girl on her period. I become very emotional, I become very depressed (almost like I'm bi polar), I can easily end up crying from stress, conflict, or negativity. Basically I become emotionally unstable in a depressive way, I can't control my emotions and thoughts from being depressive. There is a significant observable difference in my emotions when ingesting a lot of wheat.

 

Now I believe there are some studies connecting gluten and depression. Because otherwise, I don't suffer from depression. However this gluten sensitivity makes me wonder if it's something to do with my vitamin c levels in the brain. 

 

 

Just how smoking makes me feel significantly more dumber, while with most people who smoke, it doesn't. Or how I suffer from bad OCD symptoms, while most people don't. And how I suffer from depressive symptoms with gluten, while most people don't. Could this all be related to a lack of vitamin C in my brain? Thus not having enough protection to tolerate these other things?

 

This could be a strong possibility. If you read my previous post on zinc and nasal problems/allergies. I suffered through hell with these allergies/nasal problems, nothing was helping (nasal sprays, anti histamines, air purifier etc..). But with regular zinc supplementation, I can't even remember the last time I had allergies, blocked nose, or a sneezing fit. All I needed was regular zinc to tolerate these environmental allergens.

 

Maybe all I needed was regular vitamin C, to tolerate and protect my brain more.

 

 

I will leave with a few more points which I think is relevant to all of this:

 

1. My brains tolerance post alcohol consumption is weird. My hangovers lingers for days. But not in the form of headaches as most people experience. But in the form of dumbness and non clear thinking.

 

2. I noticed a month or two ago when looking at the TV. I couldn't really see it properly, there was something wrong with my eyes. Kind of like when you've looked into a bright light, a flash, or the sun, and then look at something normal, that's what I was experiencing with the TV. 

 

3. I remember suffering from the front door OCD problem as far back as 18 years old (I'm 29 now). Because I mentioned it to a staff member in my college when they were explaining dyslexic symptoms. So if related to vitamin C deficiency, it could have been a long term problem for me.

 

4. I suffer from stretch marks.

5. I use to binge drink when clubbing.

6. I suffer from short term memory problems. I have trouble remembering what I did or ate yesterday.

 

 

That's it.

 

Edited by manny, 10 June 2017 - 11:10 AM.


#15 Mr Serendipity

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 02:17 PM

Serum vitamin C concentration was inversely associated with subsequent 20-year incidence of stroke in a Japanese rural community. The Shibata study.

https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/11022052

 

Abstract

 

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Epidemiological evidence suggests that vitamin C may decrease the risk of stroke. The purpose of the present study was to examine the association of serum vitamin C concentration with the subsequent incidence of stroke.

 

METHODS:

In a Japanese rural community, a cohort of 880 men and 1241 women aged 40 years and older who were initially free of stroke was examined in 1977 and followed until 1997. The baseline examination included a measurement of serum vitamin C concentration. The incidence of stroke was determined by annual follow-up examinations and registry.

 

RESULTS:

During the 20-year observation period, 196 incident cases of all stroke, including 109 cerebral infarctions and 54 hemorrhagic strokes, were documented. Strong inverse associations were observed between serum vitamin C concentration and all stroke (sex- and age-adjusted hazard ratios were 0.93, 0.72, and 0.59, respectively, for the second, third, and fourth quartiles compared with the first quartile; P for trend=0.002), cerebral infarction (0.71, 0.59, and 0.51; P for trend=0.015), and hemorrhagic stroke (0.89, 0.75, and 0. 45; P for trend=0.013). Additional adjustments for blood pressure, serum total cholesterol, body mass index, physical activity, smoking, alcohol drinking, antihypertensive medication, atrial fibrillation, and history of ischemic heart disease did not attenuate these associations markedly.

 

CONCLUSIONS:

Serum vitamin C concentration was inversely related to the subsequent incidence of stroke. This relationship was significant for both cerebral infarction and hemorrhagic stroke. Additional mechanistic hypotheses may be required to explain our findings.

 


Edited by manny, 10 June 2017 - 02:18 PM.


#16 Mr Serendipity

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 04:34 PM

I am regretting my haphazard approach to supplementing vitamin C tablets today. I grab 2-5g here and there and just take them. Not a good idea. Especially when your colon no longer has food to help expunge excessive vitamin c. i.e. Too many trips to the toilet because you think you're going to crap yourself.

 

I also need to get back on my intermittent fasting regime to help activate my SIRT 1 gene, i.e. 500 cals or less every other day. Intermittent fasting provided a noticeable increase in clarity. 

 

Vitamin C has felt like it's benefited my mind these past 2 days. Hopefully I've jump-started my brain's supply and can now go onto a more thought out regime. However alertness is not a benefit I've noticed with vitamin C. So I feel I need to supply some sort of mild stimulant once or twice a day to help keep me more alert. Maybe a weak coffee, or a low dose of DLPA or tyrosine. 

 

Also I've ordered 1kg of Vitamin C powder, in regular Ascorbic Acid form. That will take a week to arrive, but currently I have plenty of tablets. I may also mix the powder with some baking soda. But will have to research more on why this is recommended before I do it.

 

Lastly, my thinking of my new vitamin C regime will be something like this:

 

1. 2-3g with breakfast/porridge

2. 2-3g with lunch

3. 2-3g with dinner

4. 2-3g before bed (maybe)

 

Which means I'll have to start eating breakfast. But I'm willing to do that to increase my vitamin C intake.



#17 Mr Serendipity

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Posted 11 June 2017 - 10:38 AM

So yesterdays dosing was somewhat regrettable, as I must have gone to the toilet over 10 times, i.e. I was toilet bound. But luckily I work from home, so I have immediate access to a toilet. But because I have to go to places today, I worry I won't have immediate access to a toilet, and because of this I will leave the vitamin C dosing until the evening, when I know I will be at home for the rest of the day.

 

My goal for vitamin c intake is a minimum of 6g a day, spread throughout the day. But since vitamin C powder is so cheap (1kg for around £15), and that the vitamin is extremely safe in large doses, and I believe I'm enjoying the brain health and adrenal benefits from it, I don't mind going much higher (mega dosing), as long as my bowel tolerance would allow it. If I could take 50g of vitamin C a day without needing to rush to the toilet, I would, because 50g of Vitamin C a day is equivalent to £0.75 a day! But I doubt that would happen due to my bowel tolerance. So a good goal for me would be 20g a day, spread throughout the day. But in the end it will all depend on my bowels.

 

The other thing I should note, is I'm currently taking vitamin c in tablet form, as that's all I have at the moment, and these tablets contain fillers and such. My powder was ordered yesterday and will come sometime next week. So this may effect absorption and bowel tolerance, tablet form vs 100% ascorbic acid powder. Something to keep it mind.



#18 Mr Serendipity

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Posted 12 June 2017 - 09:43 AM

Just a quick update. I didn't end up taking any vitamin c yesterday.

 

However there are two things I've noticed in general.

 

1. My visual clarity has increased. Driving down the country roads, everything looks more vivid and sharper.

 

2. At one point yesterday I was in a much better mood, almost euphoric. I won't quite say euphoric, but my brain was definitely in a happier state, with a positive outlook in life.

 

 

However the uplifted mood wasn't continuous, as I still get grumpy too. What's odd is I never use to be a grumpy guy, I'm only 29, but I feel like I'm becoming a grumpy old man already. The past 6 years my personality has been getting more grumpy.

 

I should note, I use to be a binge drinker. Not an alcoholic, but a binge drinker. As in when I went out clubbing, I would have way too much. But in-between clubbing I wouldn't drink, i.e. I could go months without a single drink.  But between the ages 16-26 I did a lot of binge drinking, which definitely wasn't good for my brain. And assuming I was already vitamin C deficient, or this exacerbated vitamin C deficiency, may be one of the reasons for my cognitive decline and bad moods.

 

The last thing I will say, is I have no doubt vitamin C is having a positive affect on my brain health/cognitionThe effects are subtle, but when going back and analysing them, I can see a marked difference in myself. I haven't had bouts of brain fog like I usually do. And I just realised just right now while typing this, I didn't even think to check my front door this morning to see if it was locked. That's what I mean by subtle, unless you analyse yourself, you miss it. Because of my mild OCD, I've had the urge to check my front door nearly every day for many years now. This morning it was not even a thought in my mind! And I've only just realised this right now when thinking back! Vitamin C has definitely abated my OCD urges to a significant degree. Then there's the increased visual clarity, mood, and clearer thinking/less brain fog I've been experiencing. Obviously people can always put this down to psychological hype and placebo effects. But the differences are very real for me, as I can see the marked improvement in multiple areas of my life, some of which would be hard to put down to placebo (like my mild OCD, front door checking, I've had for years). But once again if I did not go back and analyse myself, I probably would not have realised what effects vitamin c supplementation was having, as the effects are so subtle. I could easily mistake myself as just feeling healthier today, cause that's what I'm currently feeling with vitamin c supplementation. A healthiness surrounding my being. My breathing feels healthier, my mind feels healthier, I just feel healthier. Almost like I've taken up regular jogging or something. And it should be noted, this feeling of healthiness is not something I've experienced with my regular dosing of zinc, liquid magnesium, or vitamin e. While zinc pretty much cured my nasal allergies, and magnesium helped my cramps and anhedonia, they didn't make me feel this healthiness feeling. Rather I just observed positive health changes from the supplements. Whatever the case, the only way I can describe it, is akin to taking up regular jogging or exercise. 

 

Anyway I've written a lot, but I'll definitely end with this. I've taken and experimented with 1000's of different supplements, nootropics, medical drugs over the years, everything from A-Z. Most of the obsessive supplement taking was in part to do with my OCD, and of course health hype (every supplement is a miracle for something). Hence why I finally cut my supplement regime to the ones that really made an observable difference to my well-being. I will say vitamin C, out of all the things I've taken, has given me so far a noticeable mental boost, with minimum side effects (except diarrhea when I've take too much, i.e. easily remedied).

 

I should note down another observable effect before I go, which is something I've been experiencing in Memory. I have noticed random long term memories popping up out of the blue, along with positive emotions, and giving me nostalgia. I randomly remembered some old video games such as Sonic 3 & Knuckles, Magic Carpet, and Red Alert 2, and really felt like I wanted to play all of them again. Almost like my brain neurons are setting off more with the increased vitamin C intake.

 

And lastly lastly, I had a banana this morning and 2g of vitamin C. I hope most of this post is clearly written and coherent, as I believe my written and verbal skills have improved since my vitamin c intake has increased. And with the amount I've written in the short amount of time, I'm amazed I haven't had brain fog or writers block. I know most of you won't read this whole post. But all I can urge anyone to do, is try large doses of vitamin C split throughout the day, and see if your mind improves. Especially if you have OCD, you may see a marked improvement like I have.

 

That is all.


Edited by manny, 12 June 2017 - 10:21 AM.


#19 Mr Serendipity

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 07:53 AM

I guess it's time for an update of sorts. I'll try and do a round up of Vitamin C and my current regime.

 

My experiences with Vitamin C:

 

1. The most evident one is a huge reduction in my OCD. I'm not as stuck in the same thoughts or urges I use to have, though it still exists to a slight degree. But when I say huge reduction, I'm talking around a 90% or so reduction in my OCD urges/thoughts, that's what it feels like i.e. it's very significant.

 

2. Written and Verbal fluency has increased significantly. I don't need to go back and rewrite most sentences, because most of the time they come out well the first time I write them. My mind more automatically knows which words to use next when writing or speaking.

 

3. Visual clarity has increase. The world around me when driving down the country rounds is brighter and more vivid. Not sure if visual sharpness has increased, but I believe the colours have increased.  

 

4. Brain fog has been reduced significantly. I don't get brain fog like I use to, and I'm not dipping in the evening either. However even though I'm not suffering from major brain fog, my focus is still not all there.

 

5. Which brings me to this point. Vitamin C does not increase awakeness. It has a more calming effect.

 

6. Vitamin C has reduced my appetite (but not cravings). I believe it does this by making me a lot more bloated and gassy.

 

7. Vitamin C is giving me a subtle underlying positivity and motivation for the world ahead.

 

8. I get some tenderness in my left kidney area due to vitamin C. I believe this is due to my adrenals, and not sure how vitamin C might be stressing it out, maybe by lowering cortisol too much?

 

 

 

Ending thoughts: 

 

I do see Vitamin C as a nootropic itself, but I actually feel like it's larger benefits lie with it acting as a buffer vitamin for the brain when experimenting with other nootropics and supplements. I do wonder how many failures, side effects, and hit and misses people experience with the myriad of nootropics out there, are actually due to low levels of vitamin C in the brain. Obviously I know this is a major leap, but I do feel this is how vitamin C could work.

 

But I can say without a doubt, my mind has improved with increased vitamin C intake alone. Before this experiment, I had pretty much given up on supplements, and only stuck to ones that worked majorly well for me, while expecting I'd get the rest from my food. But even though I don't drink or smoke, and my health was is OK shape, I still suffered from brain fog and lack of energy. Vitamin C changed all that, and will be a staple in my supplement regime from now on. 

 

Lastly I will now be experimenting with other supplements, to see if I can enhance my mind even further. The main problem I still get is sleepiness/lack of focus, and I need some sort of stimulant that isn't caffeine. So I've got a few ideas, such as DLPA or B-Complex or Coq10. So I guess I'll update next here when I find something that works in conjunction with vitamin C. So I probably won't be able to report on vitamin C benefits alone anymore, as they will be tainted when I'm trying other things out.



#20 Mr Serendipity

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 03:50 PM

Wow, what a difference 9 days can make to your well being (when megadosing vitamin C). My brain feels more awake and clear and I'm full of energy. I feel like I can conquer the world with my new sense of health. I don't have brain fog, I don't have sleepiness, I don't have low energy, I'm full of confidence and it shows in my interactions. I didn't even know I had low energy until I felt this high energy I've been feeling lately. 

 

Today I woke up (albeit I slept in because it's a Sunday), and I noticed my mind is so refreshed and awake.

 

I haven't been able to test my memory or learning ability, because even though I'm meant to be studying programming (to increase my career prospects), and even though I have all this energy, awakefullness, and clarity at the moment; I still suffer from stupid procrastination. Seems like no amount of health and vitality will bypass that psychological barrier. 

 

However getting back into an exercise regime is so very highly likely. Because my energy levels use to generally be normal/low, and then use to dip in the evening even more, thus making going to the gym much more of an effort. But now I'm bursting with energy, and this energy is steady throughout the entire day, right until bed time. Going to the gym in the late evening seems very plausible.

 

I bolded and highlighted the last part, because I wanted to emphasis to you what I'm experiencing. My high energy, mind, and clarity is constant throughout the entire day, without any dips!

 

Please note I took:

 

1g of DLPA on Thursday

500mg of DLPA on Friday

225mg of DLPA on Saturday (but also contained 200mg Bromelain, 1mg Astaxanthin)

 

I could tell I needed less and less DLPA, and it was still working just as well. Since my DLPA only supplement came in 500mg. I had to take this DLPA complex instead, which contained less DLPA (225mg), but also contained those 2 other ingredients I aforementioned. Still this low dosage of the DLPA was enough for me.

 

So yesterday I took that low dose of DLPA complex in the morning. And I was awake will full energy and clarity up until 1:30am in the early morning, where I had to force myself to go to bed because I knew it was late, but my energy could have kept me up for another few hours no problem. I was also surprised I fell asleep quickly too. Also note I took high doses of vitamin C throughout the day as usual.

 

 

I have other things to talk about, but I'll end this post of these experiences here, as the next post will contain other hypothesis' and ideas. 


Edited by manny, 18 June 2017 - 03:56 PM.


#21 Mr Serendipity

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 04:53 PM

So I wanted to create a seperate subject on this.

 

Now, when ever I slept at my mother's house, I got a terrible sleep. I would toss and turn all night long. Also lately I've been getting calls from my energy company about installing Smart Meters at my home, which I refuse as they're not mandatory in the UK, and have possible health implications due to the strong EMF they give out.

 

So anyway I wanted to know more about these meters, so I watched this youtube video on it:

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=FLeCTaSG2-U

 

 

The guy explaining the dangers has the research and credentials to know what he's talking about. And I trust him on this. I've always been wary about mobile phones, microwaves, wi-fi, and EMF in general, trying to put them off for a long while before succumbing to them in the last 10 years, and forgetting of their possible dangers. 

 

Anyway my mother said she doesn't have a smart meter, so yesterday I went to investigate myself, and low and behold, a smart meter is installed outside of the house, on the floor below the bedroom I sleep in. Was this the thing causing my sleepless nights? 

 

Then this got me thinking. This all comes down to radiation exposure of sorts. I know this is all a bit layman, and my understanding is probably not 100% correct. But I wanted to find out if vitamin C could help with radiation. So I did another youtube search, and found this video:

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=Nds_7_fl614

 

 

Things I learnt from the video were Vitamin C can powerfully prevent radiation damage. Apparently when people get radiated, only 20% damages your cells DNA directly, while the other 80% makes chemicals in your blood such as water, into harmful oxidative versions of themselves, which then go on to damage other cells and their DNA in the body. By taking Vitamin C in high doses, you help prevent/greatly reduce the damage these oxidative substances in your blood can do, because of the anti-oxidant power of vitamin c. 

 

Also even if the body experiences genetic abnormalities because of heavy irradiation, these genes normalize again if vitamin c and other supplements is taken orally or intravenously! 

 

The main study done in this video, is a study where mice after being exposed to a lethal dose of radiation, all die after 14 days. However if you give them vitamin c for 3 days at 150mg/kg, 60% of the mice live longer than 2 weeks, and 42% survive! i.e. Going from a 0% chance of surviving after 14 days, to a 42% chance of surviving when taking high doses of vitamin C!

 

 

I didn't watch the video all the way through properly, and there may be other important stuff in there. But it makes me think, with the rise of wireless technologies in mass the last 20 years. Wi-Fi, mobile phones, cordless phones, and everything else. And we're exposed to these EMF/wireless waves in higher doses, and on a more regular basis then in any other time in history. Assuming the high exposure to these wireless technologies is dangerous and similar to other radiation poisoning. Vitamin C might not only be giving me great energy and clarity because of all the other health/brain benefits it's meant to be good for. But also because it's helping reduce the harmful effects of these powerful wireless technologies we are exposed to regularly.

 

 

I should finish off, as I forgot to mention earlier. In the first video, the guy talks about the Sutro Tower Childhood Cancer Study. There was some sort of strong wireless tower put in San Francisco in the 70's. And basically between 1973-1988, childhood leukemia in the San Francisco area increased by 18 fold, i.e. 1800%!

 

What's significant about this study is back then, people didn't have all these wireless devices as we do today. So something like the Sutro Tower and wireless exposure is very clear, as well as the correlation to the childhood cancer rates around the area it was placed.

 

Anyway those are my thoughts.


Edited by manny, 18 June 2017 - 04:55 PM.


#22 Mr Serendipity

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 08:32 PM

Look what I found in someone else's experience with Vitamin C: https://www.reddit.c...d_motivation_i/

 

I recently started taking Vitamin C in the morning (as ascorbic acid, 1000mg). I have ADHD and a terrible lack of motivation, and I noticed that in the last few days, I get things done much more easily.

It's not like amphetamine euphoria where you say "LET'S DO IT! YEAH!", it's more like "Okay, guess we should do it here and now" - I don't mentally fight with myself as much to get up from the chair and do stuff I need to, it feels like it comes more naturally.

I have taken Magnesium, Zinc and Vitamin D for months but have not felt this. Only now that I have added Vitamin C I suddenly feel this motivation.

I have to say, motivation-wise, it is even better than the ADHD stimulants I tried (Adderall/Methylphenidate). I don't feel euphoria or "feel-good" dopaminergic high, but I feel like things are just easier to get done, and it feels natural, like it always have been so.

Did anyone else notice this?

 

I bolded and underlined the bit that was interesting to me. Because I experienced the same thing, which I noted in my Vitamin C + Caffeine thread years back in post #14 of that thread: http://www.longecity...otropic-effect/

 

Ok, I think vitamin c is having an in the background, nootropic effect in my life.

 
For example while at work, my negative inner voice of what I could be doing instead, has lessened. Almost, I don't find work as begrudging as usual.
 
Also I woke up at 3:30am today, though my alarm was set for 4:30am. Not that this means anything. But usually trying to create a productive morning once awoken is quite hard for me. I usually just sit on the computer surfing the net, and realise I wasted my early morning. But today I started practicing the keyboard, and didn't find it tiresome or frustrating for the first 30 mins. Though I've sort of wasted my morning again, and in a sense I don't feel like I have. Infact I've planned out tomorrow morning so I know what I should do, so lets hope I follow it.
 
Also note how he say's he was taking Zinc, Magnesium, and Vitamin D beforehand, and didn't notice those changes until he started taking Vitamin C too. This similarly reflects my recent experience with vitamin C very closely; as I was regularly taking Zinc, Magnesium, and Vitamin E (before this vitamin C experiment), and would still lack in certain health aspects (OCD mainly, but also brain fog and low energy). 

Edited by manny, 18 June 2017 - 08:34 PM.


#23 Heisok

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Posted 29 January 2018 - 06:33 PM

Excellent topic Manny. Your DLPA experience is the same as mine which I would periodically use for seasonal depression. Front loading. Day 1 - 1.5 gms, day 2 -1 gram, and day 3 forward 500 mgs. I would take it for weeks or a couple months at a time. I first tried it at age 18, and repeated it many times through the 30 plus years, but not every year.

 

One caveat is that part of the mechanism might be an bipolar like effect where a mildly manic mood can be flipped into. A Psychiatrist once discussed her experience with some of her patients. I have not seen studies, but there might be some. I have not used the protocol for many years, as I have found that full spectrum bright light, and blue light Seasonal Affective treatment works great. Actually at least 1 member here, Lostfalco, uses a light as part of their morning routine. I do also.

 

As far as Vitamin C, I do get a pretty good boost of energy from large doses. 4 to 5 grams of C taken 5 times a day from ascorbic acid. MG ascorbate, Sodium ascorbate  and sometimes Potassium ascorbate.

 

Interesting to me is that a few grams of ascorbic acid from liposomal C taken on an empty stomach gives me a far greater, and far faster boost in energy. I will assume that one of the reasons is the contribution of the constituents of the lecithin Phospholipids including the Phosphatidylcholine.

 

 

 


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#24 Nate-2004

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Posted 29 January 2018 - 08:39 PM

@manny Good info on C, but RE: Original Post, don't forget to get a sleep study done, could be sleep apnea.


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#25 Mr Serendipity

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 10:33 AM

@Nate-2004 - That may be the case I don't know much about it, but I do snore now, which I never use to when I was younger. I believe this could be a result of weight gain, and hopefully it will correct itself once I lose the weight and increase my fitness levels. If not I'll have to look into correcting this then.

 

@Heisok - Thanks for sharing your experiences and research. 

 

I originally took DLPA to help with keeping my brain awake throughout the day, because I was getting tired/brain fog in the evening for no reason. However once I experimented with Vitamin C, it pretty much cured what must have been a deficiency in the brain. My mental clarity, energy, and alertness went up, my mild OCD went way down, and I didn't suffer brain fog/tiredness when on it. So I saw no more need to experiment with DLPA.

 

If I had to sum up what I would think is the best simple nootropic stack to help most peoples mental fatigue/clarity problems would be, it would literally be Vitamin C + Gingko Biloba. Gingko definitely has an effect on memory, because I would get flashbacks of memories of when I was younger, which I had long forgotten they were there.

 

Also Gingko seems to definitely have an effect on my circulation, because when I'm on it, my dick literally hangs longer in the flaccid state, literally, which I've never seen with any other supplement I've used; I'm talking about a very visible difference. It should be noted I'm a grower (not a shower) and suffered from peyronies disease. Thank God my peyronies disease has pretty much corrected itself to normal over the years with supplement taking, however I'm still prone to flare ups and very small flaccids (I'm talking like 1/2 an inch) if I take the wrong supplement (iodine, coq10, carnitine), ingest stimulants (caffeine), or there's just too much inflammation in my body in general (eating KFC fried chicken for example). I actually use my dick as an indicator of which supplements my body needs these days, since it's very sensitive and easily affected with what I put into my body.

 

Things like coq10, carnitine, & iodine I could take in the past no problem, these days no way. In fact coq10 will give me MAJOR brain fog now, even when ingested from a natural source like lamb's heart (which I had no problem eating in the past). I believe messing with every supplement from A-Z, drugs, steroids, & megadosing supplements in the past since the age of 16, has causes a shift in my body where I'm just more sensitive to supplements in general, even at low doses. In fact if I ever experiment with caffeine, I usually drink a coke now, because the caffeine in a normal cup of tea or coffee is just too much.

 

Whatever the case, if I could describe it in some BS esoteric terms of what I mean. I've shifted more toward things that yang, calming, anti inflammatory, & generally good for your health; i.e. vitamin e, vitamin c, gingko, zinc, magnesium, b12. While avoiding things which are yin, exciting, stimulating, generally good for your health unless your body's sensitive like mine; i.e. coq10, carnitine, iodine, b-complex, caffeine, etc..

 

To me it feels like I've come full circle in my supplement taking. I went to the extremes and after nearly a decade, realised the best ones to take are the ones which benefit you the most. Don't fall for the hype, every supplement looks amazing/is a miracle supplement on paper. But imo you can take loads of different supplements which are suppose to benefit you, and won't get half the results as when you take the one supplement your body really needed.

 

This is why I create this thread, wow, 4 years back now: http://www.longecity...l-deficiencies/

 

I do believe though my excessive supplement taking over the years was caused by my mild OCD. 

 

Anyway this was all a bit off topic from Vitamin C, but it'll at least give people an idea of body's state of health in comparison to my Vitamin C experiences. 


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#26 Mr Serendipity

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Posted 02 February 2018 - 12:31 PM

I just want to reiterate and make perfectly clear since last year when I started this thread. 

 

Vitamin C is the best brain supplement hands down.

 

Everyone on this forum should be taking it, even if it's just 2g a day. 

 

I'm just looking back on my life and realise how much I use to suffer from brain fatigue, ocd, lack of mental clarity, and rewriting sentences again and again until I just got it right (ocd). I tried so many different things, and so many were hit and miss. Vitamin C on the other hand is hit hit hit hit...

 

My brain doesn't get fatigued anymore, I don't lack mental clarity, my ocd is very low, and my brain just feels healthy and functioning normally. I have no need to seek nootropics anymore, when you think clearly again, when you have the brain energy, it doesn't feel like you lacking in anything brain related. 

 

The only thing I lack, is applying myself to make use of my energetic brain. Vitamin C helps diminish your negative inner voice (look through previous posts of mine and other peoples experience on this), however it doesn't get rid of procrastination, it doesn't make you do things you don't want to (though it will give you plenty of energy to do it!). The only things in my opinion that will help these things, is a change of mindset (psychological), and maybe a stimulant to help push you to do things.

 

But other than not fixing motivational problems, vitamin c will give you the best mental clarity & energy you will ever get out of a supplement.

 

I wish I could take mega doses of Vitamin C everyday but the bowel intolerance is a killer; because I was on the highest energy levels when megadosing (10g+), this is why I'm just taking 2g in the morning with my other supplements (convenience and no toilet troubles). I have yet to test liposomal Vitamin C which is meant to avoid the bowel intolerance problems, because it's so damn expensive, and I'm not sure how well I'll be able to make it myself. But I think I'm going to buy some and try megadosing it. If it avoids the bowel intolerance and I'm absorbing high amounts of Vitamin C, I can't imagine how high energy I'll become. And if it works so well as people claim, I'm going to have to learn to make it myself, or just spend a lot of money on it every month.

 

Watch this space, coming soon, my experiences of mega dosing liposomal vitamin c.

 

Update: Just ordered some Liposomal Vitamin C off Amazon, it's coming Monday, so expect the experiment to start Monday or Tuesday. This is the brand I bought: https://www.amazon.c...uct/B071VRNHPF/


Edited by manny, 02 February 2018 - 12:51 PM.

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#27 Jiminy Glick

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Posted 02 February 2018 - 03:20 PM

Yeah I experimented with large vitamin c does and yes it does make you feel great. I stopped taking it just because I needed to take other things and you can only drink so much water in a day. 


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#28 Mr Serendipity

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Posted 04 February 2018 - 02:41 PM

Ok, like I said, I ordered a liposomal Vitamin C from Amazon and it will be here Monday/Tuesday. Cost £29.99 for 150ml.

 

But I just found this one: https://www.actinovo...c-ascorbic-acid

 

It's 250ml for 19.80 Eur which is £17.47! So 100ml more for around £12 less. And the website and brand looks more professional, seems like they specialise in liposomals. And it's made in Germany too, and German's known for their properness. 

 

So I'm going to order from there too and try it out, and posting it here for future reference.



#29 Mr Serendipity

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Posted 04 February 2018 - 03:08 PM

Ok update. The delivery for that euro site to UK was a flat rate of 9.90 euros whether I ordered 1 or more. So I had £90 on my revolut card that wasn't going to be used anytime soon (revolut gives interbank foreign exchange rates with no fees), so I ended up buying 5 of them inc postage for £81.84. So 1.25 litres. Plus that 150ml from that other brand from amazon.

I hope this is a good brand since I never bothered testing 1 before ordering more. But if it is, I've got plenty to use for my mega dosing experiment. Wish me luck.

Edited by manny, 04 February 2018 - 03:10 PM.

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#30 Galaxyshock

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Posted 04 February 2018 - 03:24 PM

I think I should give Vitamin C a try since I suffer from afternoon fatigue and brain fog despite taking bunch of adaptogens etc. Don't flavonoids like Quercetin work very synergistically with vitamin C? Maybe adding a food with naturally high vitamin C concentrations along with the phytonutrients like Camu Camu is better than synthetic pills?







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