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Trodusquemine reverses atherosclerosis

atherosclerosis cvd heart disease

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#1 smithx

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Posted 02 November 2017 - 11:10 PM


Popularizing article:

Just ONE dose of new wonder drug can 'melt away' the fat inside arteries that causes heart attacks and strokes and it also REVERSES signs of the disease

  • Trodusquemine shows promising results for treating breast cancer and diabetes
  • Now researchers have found it reverses the effects of atherosclerosis
  • This is where arteries become clogged with fat, causing heart disease
  • The drug 'mimics' the effects of exercise and activates protective enzyme
  • It also inhibits another that causes prolonged inflammation and hardens arteries
  • Heart disease is number cause of death globally, killing 17.7 million people a year

http://www.dailymail...ease-signs.html

 

Paper
http://www.clinsci.o...0/2489.full.pdf

Other findings about the drug:
https://professional...duces-adiposity
https://professional...-models-insulin

 

 


Edited by smithx, 02 November 2017 - 11:11 PM.

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#2 Richard McGee

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Posted 03 November 2017 - 12:12 AM

From the cited paper:

We demonstrate here, using the LDLR−/− mouse model of atherosclerosis, that pharmacological PTP1B systemic in- hibition leads to protection against and reversal of atherosclerosis development, suggesting beneficial effects of PTP1B inhibition for the treatment of CVDs and reduction in CVD risk. We present evidence that, in addition to its improve- ment in glucose homeostasis and adiposity, PTP1B inhibition results in activation of aortic Akt and AMPKα1, that is independent of the effects on the IR itself. Most importantly, for the first time, we demonstrate that inhibition of PTP1B results in a decrease in circulating serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels and protection against atheroscle- rotic plaque formation.

 

 

There are a number of compounds available to the general public that inhibit PTP1B. One example is Magnolia Officinalis Extract. Assuming PTP1B inhibition is the effective cause, you might have similar success with this compound.

 

https://www.hindawi....ri/2015/139451/

 

Not expensive at all, BTW:

 

https://www.swansonv...-400-mg-60-caps

 

 


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#3 Believer

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Posted 03 November 2017 - 12:35 AM

The cause is lipoprotein(a). Inhibit that sufficiently and you lose plaque. Inhibit it too much and you will probably bleed or some such. The cause of strokes is simple, it's coagulation, but block the coagulation excessively and you die from bleeding. Plaque like clots have a purpose in the body.

Another thing to atherosclerosis is calcification, which you can remove with vitamin K2.


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#4 zorba990

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Posted 03 November 2017 - 01:32 AM

Tocopherol nicotinate seems to lower lp(a) although the fact it is broken down (mostly) during digestion probably means niacin plus alpha tocopherol would work just as well, although it may raise levels of other lipids.

https://www.ncbi.nlm...83/#!po=58.3333

"Noma et al. [43] evaluated the effects of α-tocopheryl nicotinate supplementation (600 mg/day) on serum lipoprotein(a) levels in 28 hyperlipidemic patients. After 2 months of α-tocopheryl nicotinate treatment, serum lipoprotein(a) levels significantly declined in patients with initial lipoprotein(a) levels ≥18 mg/dL. Serum lipids, lipoproteins, and apolipoproteins, other than lipoprotein(a), tended to increase in response to α-tocopheryl nicotinate."

"They concluded that both α-tocopheryl nicotinate and α-tocopheryl acetate were readily converted into free α-tocopherol following oral administration, although larger concentrations of α-tocopheryl nicotinate were found in the blood, suggesting that more α-tocopheryl nicotinate escapes hydrolysis in the gastrointestinal tract compared with α-tocopheryl acetate.

Nakamura et al. investigated the intestinal absorption of 12 different α-tocopherol esters in rats [24]. They also demonstrated that α-tocopheryl nicotinate was hydrolyzed more slowly than α-tocopheryl acetate and that the hydrolysis of esters was not a prerequisite for intestinal absorption."

Edited by zorba990, 03 November 2017 - 01:33 AM.

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#5 mikey

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Posted 09 November 2017 - 11:35 PM

Does anyone know the human dose for trodusquemine and a quality source for it?


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#6 izan82

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 06:38 PM

Does anyone know the human dose for trodusquemine and a quality source for it?

this



#7 mikey

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Posted 11 November 2017 - 05:38 PM

 

Does anyone know the human dose for trodusquemine and a quality source for it?

this

 

 

 

This what?


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#8 Rocket

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Posted 11 November 2017 - 09:25 PM

Apparently tea is an inhibitor of PTP1B

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC3070786/


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#9 Darryl

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 12:50 AM

Trodusquemine has great preclinical evidence. but given Dr. Zasloff's history I'm fine with waiting for clinical trials.


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#10 mikey

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 04:03 AM

If we waited for FDA approval I might never have experienced DMSO healing my torn Achilles, without immobilization.

The doctor said that this was considered to be “medically impossible “ but that I could quote him. I quoted him on a newspaper article and he, apparently, was reprimanded.

I’m more likely to trust a credible source of an invention than FDA.

FDA’s primary interest is rendering that everything that’s pharmaceutical in the world’s richest market keeps chugging along, and being wary of upstarts. Especially upstarts that could upset or antiquidate revenue sources of large players. That’s where balls stop.

Being a collaborator with a large supportive partner that knows and values young ideas would likely be the doctors best option, if possible.

I’m just guessing though. I owe it to myself to make an effort to interview the doctor.

Unless the doctor makes no sense I remain interested in researching it even if it will never gets past the moat around the FDA.

US media dumbs down and plays to get readers rather than world-wide viewers.
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#11 tunt01

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 12:32 PM

PTP1B is some kind of regulatory checkpoint for insulin signaling.  Its activation inhibits insulin signaling.  It's been a possible drug target for T2D and other metabolic disturbances like MetS. 

 

A variety of substances inhibit its activity, beyond exercise, which will restore insulin signaling and improve Akt2 activity.  Ursolic Acid, Honokiol, Bitter Melon, and anything upregulating SIRT1 will all downregulate PTP1B in skeletal muscle.

 

PTP1B also has activity in the hypothalamus where it inhibits leptin receptor activity and is involved in energy balance.  If the drug crosses the BBB and gets to the hypothalamus, presumably it would be greatly upregulating leptin sensitivity.

 


Edited by prophets, 12 November 2017 - 01:08 PM.

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#12 smithx

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 08:41 PM

Trodusquemine has great preclinical evidence. but given Dr. Zasloff's history I'm fine with waiting for clinical trials.

 

My reading of the article you linked is that the FDA should have approved the drug. 

 

They say that the drug he had worked on previously actually was effective but was denied approval by the FDA because it was no more effective than other antibiotics at the time, even though his drug was uniquely unlikely to become subject to bacterial resistance. 

 

The thrust of the article was that the FDA approval process was broken and Zasloff's drug should have been approved.


Edited by smithx, 13 November 2017 - 08:42 PM.

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#13 Daniel Cooper

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 09:24 PM

 

Trodusquemine has great preclinical evidence. but given Dr. Zasloff's history I'm fine with waiting for clinical trials.

 

My reading of the article you linked is that the FDA should have approved the drug. 

 

They say that the drug he had worked on previously actually was effective but was denied approval by the FDA because it was no more effective than other antibiotics at the time, even though his drug was uniquely unlikely to become subject to bacterial resistance. 

 

The thrust of the article was that the FDA approval process was broken and Zasloff's drug should have been approved.

 

 

 

Bingo.  The FDA is broken and might at this point actually be killing more people by keeping effective treatments off the market for an extra decade or more (or in some cases, forever) than they are saving by keeping dangerous drugs off the market.

 

If the computer industry had a gate keeper of the nature of the FDA starting back in the 1980s we'd all be using dial up modems right now, and longevity.org would be a BBS.


Edited by Daniel Cooper, 13 November 2017 - 09:36 PM.

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#14 Rocket

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 01:40 AM

Trodusquemine has great preclinical evidence. but given Dr. Zasloff's history I'm fine with waiting for clinical trials.


My reading of the article you linked is that the FDA should have approved the drug.

They say that the drug he had worked on previously actually was effective but was denied approval by the FDA because it was no more effective than other antibiotics at the time, even though his drug was uniquely unlikely to become subject to bacterial resistance.

The thrust of the article was that the FDA approval process was broken and Zasloff's drug should have been approved.


Bingo. The FDA is broken and might at this point actually be killing more people by keeping effective treatments off the market for an extra decade or more (or in some cases, forever) than they are saving by keeping dangerous drugs off the market.

If the computer industry had a gate keeper of the nature of the FDA starting back in the 1980s we'd all be using dial up modems right now, and longevity.org would be a BBS.

That's what happens when LAW MAKING powers and handed over to un-elected beaurocrats which is what we have in the USA with the FDA, DEA, FAA, BLM and etc.
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#15 Daniel Cooper

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 02:48 AM

 

 

 

Trodusquemine has great preclinical evidence. but given Dr. Zasloff's history I'm fine with waiting for clinical trials.


My reading of the article you linked is that the FDA should have approved the drug.

They say that the drug he had worked on previously actually was effective but was denied approval by the FDA because it was no more effective than other antibiotics at the time, even though his drug was uniquely unlikely to become subject to bacterial resistance.

The thrust of the article was that the FDA approval process was broken and Zasloff's drug should have been approved.


Bingo. The FDA is broken and might at this point actually be killing more people by keeping effective treatments off the market for an extra decade or more (or in some cases, forever) than they are saving by keeping dangerous drugs off the market.

If the computer industry had a gate keeper of the nature of the FDA starting back in the 1980s we'd all be using dial up modems right now, and longevity.org would be a BBS.

That's what happens when LAW MAKING powers and handed over to un-elected beaurocrats which is what we have in the USA with the FDA, DEA, FAA, BLM and etc.

 

 

 

It's not just the US, it's everywhere.  These rules are all ultimately made by politicians, in every country.  People don't become politicians because they are extremely intelligent, or have detailed knowledge of some technical area, they become politician because they are better than the average bear at telling people what they want to hear in a convincing manner.  This is the case everywhere you go.

 

For those interested in longevity, it is my opinion that our interests are best served by figuring ways to work around the world's governments.  Their interests are not ours.  Once you start seeing doctors set up offshore clinics where the wealthy can purchase these cutting edge treatments and ordinary people start to see that they work in a dramatic fashion, the demand for this medical technology will make it in the political class's interest to remove the FDA a  gatekeeper as they currently exist.  Short of that I don't see the current situation changing because the average voter simply doesn't understand that advanced treatments are being denied to him under the current regime.

 

 

 

 

 


 


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#16 izan82

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 06:38 PM

 

 

Does anyone know the human dose for trodusquemine and a quality source for it?

this

 

 

 

This what?

 

group buy


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#17 smithx

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 07:21 PM

From what I'm finding so far, it seems quite expensive:
https://www.medcheme...m/MSI-1436.html

group buy



#18 Daniel Cooper

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 07:39 PM

From what I'm finding so far, it seems quite expensive:
https://www.medcheme...m/MSI-1436.html
 

group buy

 

 

 

I think you'd have to contract with a synthesis lab to get a source that is even remotely affordable.



#19 Rocket

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Posted 15 November 2017 - 08:13 PM

This is a good article on senescent cells and atherosclerosis

 

https://www.scienced...61027143348.htm

 


 



#20 PWAIN

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 09:37 AM

If anyone wants to run a group buy, I'm in!!

 

Anyone else? lets gauge interest.

 

 

 

From what I'm finding so far, it seems quite expensive:
https://www.medcheme...m/MSI-1436.html
 

group buy

 

 

 

I think you'd have to contract with a synthesis lab to get a source that is even remotely affordable.

 

 


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#21 Rocket

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 01:47 PM

I'm in



#22 mikey

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Posted 22 November 2017 - 06:32 PM

If we waited for FDA approval I might never have experienced DMSO healing my torn Achilles, without immobilization.

The doctor said that this was considered to be “medically impossible “ but that I could quote him. I quoted him on a newspaper article and he, apparently, was reprimanded.

I’m more likely to trust a credible source of an invention than FDA.

FDA’s primary interest is rendering that everything that’s pharmaceutical in the world’s richest market keeps chugging along, and being wary of upstarts. Especially upstarts that could upset or antiquidate revenue sources of large players. That’s where balls stop.

Being a collaborator with a large supportive partner that knows and values young ideas would likely be the doctors best option, if possible.

I’m just guessing though. I owe it to myself to make an effort to interview the doctor.

Unless the doctor makes no sense I remain interested in researching it even if it will never gets past the moat around the FDA.

US media dumbs down and plays to get readers rather than world-wide viewers.

 

For those that are unaware of DMSO, its tremendous beneficial effects and FDA trying to inhibit the public from knowing about the medical uses of DMSO, you can read my article about it at http://www.michaelmooney.net/DMSO.html


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#23 beijair

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Posted 29 November 2017 - 02:29 AM

If we waited for FDA approval I might never have experienced DMSO healing my torn Achilles, without immobilization.

The doctor said that this was considered to be “medically impossible “ but that I could quote him. I quoted him on a newspaper article and he, apparently, was reprimanded.

I’m more likely to trust a credible source of an invention than FDA.

FDA’s primary interest is rendering that everything that’s pharmaceutical in the world’s richest market keeps chugging along, and being wary of upstarts. Especially upstarts that could upset or antiquidate revenue sources of large players. That’s where balls stop.

Being a collaborator with a large supportive partner that knows and values young ideas would likely be the doctors best option, if possible.

I’m just guessing though. I owe it to myself to make an effort to interview the doctor.

Unless the doctor makes no sense I remain interested in researching it even if it will never gets past the moat around the FDA.

US media dumbs down and plays to get readers rather than world-wide viewers.


For those that are unaware of DMSO, its tremendous beneficial effects and FDA trying to inhibit the public from knowing about the medical uses of DMSO, you can read my article about it at http://www.michaelmooney.net/DMSO.html
I read it and it sounds more like someone pushing a product. I'll need to read other sources to determine if it useful for me.
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#24 mikey

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Posted 29 November 2017 - 03:41 AM

If we waited for FDA approval I might never have experienced DMSO healing my torn Achilles, without immobilization.

The doctor said that this was considered to be “medically impossible “ but that I could quote him. I quoted him on a newspaper article and he, apparently, was reprimanded.

I’m more likely to trust a credible source of an invention than FDA.

FDA’s primary interest is rendering that everything that’s pharmaceutical in the world’s richest market keeps chugging along, and being wary of upstarts. Especially upstarts that could upset or antiquidate revenue sources of large players. That’s where balls stop.

Being a collaborator with a large supportive partner that knows and values young ideas would likely be the doctors best option, if possible.

I’m just guessing though. I owe it to myself to make an effort to interview the doctor.

Unless the doctor makes no sense I remain interested in researching it even if it will never gets past the moat around the FDA.

US media dumbs down and plays to get readers rather than world-wide viewers.

For those that are unaware of DMSO, its tremendous beneficial effects and FDA trying to inhibit the public from knowing about the medical uses of DMSO, you can read my article about it at http://www.michaelmooney.net/DMSO.html
I read it and it sounds more like someone pushing a product. I'll need to read other sources to determine if it useful for me.

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#25 mikey

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Posted 29 November 2017 - 03:49 AM

I confirm that I’m a DMSO zealot. After all it did what my foot surgeon said was”medically impossible” and if one studies DMSO’s history it is impossible to ignore the attention DMSO received before FDA tried to make it inaccessible to the public in their role of protecting the medical/pharmaceutical industry from inexpensive competition. That DMSO was the focus of three “60 Minutes” television programs should mandate consideration of the world-wide interest that DMSO generated. Search YouTube “DMSO and 60 Minutes” to gain more unbiased information.
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#26 pamojja

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Posted 29 November 2017 - 11:35 AM

Search YouTube “DMSO and 60 Minutes” to gain more unbiased information.

 
Or even better get solid information from the book: 'THE DMSO HANDBOOK: A New Paradigm in Healthcare' by a german scientist Hartmut P. A. Fischer, also available in german. Even gives detailed instructions for IVs.

 

I found YouTube videos all over the place, with at times contradicting information.


Edited by pamojja, 29 November 2017 - 11:36 AM.

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#27 mikey

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Posted 29 November 2017 - 05:53 PM

Preceding that was “DMSO: Nature’s Healer” by Walker.
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#28 JGCJulie

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Posted 10 December 2017 - 07:06 AM

Hi there!  If any of you are going to get together on a group buy of trodusquemine, I'd like to participate.  :)



#29 Daniel Cooper

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 02:00 AM

So what is the level of interest in getting a Trodusquemine group buy together?

 

Anyone know of a lab that we pursue this with?

 

 

 



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#30 PWAIN

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 11:43 AM

I'm in for any group buy.





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