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Any Plasmapheresis Studies Done on Aging?

plasmapheresis

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#1 pone11

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Posted 08 January 2018 - 07:57 AM


For years researchers have been joining the circulatory systems of old and young animals and observing about the joined animals that the old animals become younger and the young animals become older.   Researchers at first believed that there must be some substance in the young blood that turned old animals young.  GDF-11 is one substance that was studied and most researchers have rejected it.

 

Researchers Irina and Michael Conboy at Berkeley observed the whole fiasco with GDF-11 and did an important experiment that seems to suggest that the problem is there is something in old blood that causes aging, rather than something in young blood that produces youth.   In interviews they did over a year ago, the Conboys proposed an experiment using plasmapheresis to try to take out proteins from the blood of old animals and observe what effects this has on aging.

 

Does anyone know:

 

1) Was the Conboy's research ever funded?  Is there a study in progress?

 

2) Is any research group testing this idea in mice or other animals by doing plasmapheresis on old animals at regular intervals?

 

To my thinking, this is an incredibly powerful idea and very low hanging fruit because plasmapheresis is already an FDA approved procedure and the equipment and methods already exist.  Getting regulatory approvals to use these procedures in humans would be far easier than the FDA approvals needed to administer any new drug.   It's quite frustrating that such an obvious idea has problems even getting financing.



#2 ceridwen

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Posted 08 January 2018 - 12:23 PM

Is there anyway we can get this? Any clinical trials?

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#3 to age or not to age

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Posted 08 January 2018 - 03:55 PM

there is indeed certain plasma study I am aware of, but unfortunately, I am not at liberty to share this information. I can say that the results so far are intriguing. 


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#4 pone11

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Posted 09 January 2018 - 04:24 AM

there is indeed certain plasma study I am aware of, but unfortunately, I am not at liberty to share this information. I can say that the results so far are intriguing. 

 

There are lots of plasma studies, most notably the one the Stanford group recently did on Alzheimer's.   I am asking about plasmapheresis specifically, not plasma exchange.



#5 Iuvenale

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Posted 20 January 2018 - 12:57 PM

Pre-announcement Announcement

Life Extension Foundation has just announced that next week they are going to announce a partnership with the Young Blood Institute for what is perhaps the most ambitious human trial of anti-aging medicine ever. It’s a daring project, with what is IMO a most promising target. But I find details of their protocol puzzling, and haven’t been able to get satisfying answers from LEF or from YBI about why they’ve made the choices they have, and how they will be able to learn from the project.

The principal treatment consists in 6 plasma transfusions scheduled over 4 weeks.
Extensive testing is planned, including telomere age and methylation age in addition to a full battery of standard blood tests like lipids and inflammation markers.
The program is self-funded by research subjects, with projected cost ~ $50,000 per participant.
In each transfusion procedure, red and white blood cells will be separated and cycled back into the subject. Blood plasma with dissolved blood chemicals will be removed. It will be replaced not by full plasma from a donor but by albumin and gamma globulin only.

Read the rest here https://joshmitteldo...rial-in-humans/

#6 pone11

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Posted 22 January 2018 - 12:43 AM

Pre-announcement Announcement

Life Extension Foundation has just announced that next week they are going to announce a partnership with the Young Blood Institute for what is perhaps the most ambitious human trial of anti-aging medicine ever. It’s a daring project, with what is IMO a most promising target. But I find details of their protocol puzzling, and haven’t been able to get satisfying answers from LEF or from YBI about why they’ve made the choices they have, and how they will be able to learn from the project.

The principal treatment consists in 6 plasma transfusions scheduled over 4 weeks.
Extensive testing is planned, including telomere age and methylation age in addition to a full battery of standard blood tests like lipids and inflammation markers.
The program is self-funded by research subjects, with projected cost ~ $50,000 per participant.
In each transfusion procedure, red and white blood cells will be separated and cycled back into the subject. Blood plasma with dissolved blood chemicals will be removed. It will be replaced not by full plasma from a donor but by albumin and gamma globulin only.

Read the rest here https://joshmitteldo...rial-in-humans/

 

They are going to charge people $50K to participate in their research?  Doesn't that violate all kinds of research protocols and create bias in their population sample?


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#7 JamesPaul

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Posted 06 September 2019 - 03:43 AM

The Conboys and other authors of the second article below used pharmacologic methods of reducing transforming growth factor (TGF) β and increasing oxytocin in blood.  (I list them because they are familiar names.)  This appeared to work better than heterochronic parabiosis for rejuvenating muscle, brain, and liver cells.

The first article referenced below is a layman's summary of the 2nd article.

https://www.leafscie...ing-aged-blood/

https://www.aging-us...cle/102148/text

the citation for the second article is

Mehdipour M, Etienne J, Chen C, Gathwala R, Rehman M, Kato C, Liu C, Liu Y, Zuo Y, Conboy MJ, Conboy IM. Rejuvenation of brain, liver and muscle by simultaneous pharmacological modulation of two signaling determinants, that change in opposite directions with age. Aging (Albany NY). 2019; 11:5628-5645. https://doi.org/10.18632/aging.102148

 

Someone posted to Josh Mitteldorf's site that EGCg, myricetin, and hesperetin may have rejuvenation effects because of similar signaling effects.  He cited these two articles:

http://ejbio.imedpub.com/natural-compounds-targeting-transforming-growth-factorin-silico-and-in-vitro-study.php?aid=17673
https://www.ncbi.nlm...cles/PMC3513570
 

 Does anyone know how just plain folks might take advantage of these in a safe, practical way?

By the way I went to Josh Mitteldorf's science blog site and could not find the post.  It must have been removed.  I wonder why.


Edited by JamesPaul, 06 September 2019 - 04:11 AM.

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