• Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log In with Google      Sign In    
  • Create Account
  LongeCity
              Advocacy & Research for Unlimited Lifespans

Photo
* * * * * 2 votes

How long do you think humans can live by doing CR?


  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
112 replies to this topic

Poll: How long do you think humans can live by doing CR? (239 member(s) have cast votes)

How many extra years beyond average life span do you think you can live by doing CR?

  1. I don't believe Cr works at all in humans (14 votes [5.83%])

    Percentage of vote: 5.83%

  2. less than 5 extra years (31 votes [12.92%])

    Percentage of vote: 12.92%

  3. 5-10 extra years (57 votes [23.75%])

    Percentage of vote: 23.75%

  4. 10-15 extra years (45 votes [18.75%])

    Percentage of vote: 18.75%

  5. 15-20 extra years (25 votes [10.42%])

    Percentage of vote: 10.42%

  6. 20-30 extra years (38 votes [15.83%])

    Percentage of vote: 15.83%

  7. 30-40 extra years (12 votes [5.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 5.00%

  8. 40-50 extra years (4 votes [1.67%])

    Percentage of vote: 1.67%

  9. 50-60 extra years (3 votes [1.25%])

    Percentage of vote: 1.25%

  10. 60 extra years or even more (11 votes [4.58%])

    Percentage of vote: 4.58%

Vote

#1 VictorBjoerk

  • Member, Life Member
  • 1,763 posts
  • 91
  • Location:Sweden

Posted 19 April 2008 - 08:40 PM


Hello

The BMI poll got a lot of votes so I figured that I should create another poll as it seems to generate interesting discussions.

The question is:How much do you think a correctly practised CR diet can extend the human lifespan assuming the restriction is severe(around 40%) and started at age 20?

The poll choices is the number of extra years beyond average life expectancy assuming it is 80 years.
Please motivate why you voted as you did

Looking forward to the discussion as there are so many experienced people hanging here.
  • like x 1

#2 VictorBjoerk

  • Topic Starter
  • Member, Life Member
  • 1,763 posts
  • 91
  • Location:Sweden

Posted 19 April 2008 - 09:17 PM

let's see how it proceeds.........

#3 Live Forever

  • Guest Recorder
  • 7,475 posts
  • 9
  • Location:Atlanta, GA USA

Posted 19 April 2008 - 09:18 PM

Depends on what age someone starts it. It is more of a percentage thing, right? If someone started it at 80, right before they were going to croak, I don't think it would add much, but if they started it at 40 it would add quite a bit.

Edited by Live Forever, 19 April 2008 - 09:19 PM.


#4 forever freedom

  • Guest
  • 2,358 posts
  • 69

Posted 19 April 2008 - 10:06 PM

Since i'm a chronic optimist i say that CR will add 20 to 30 years to human lifespan, if started earlier (at 20-40 y.o.) and done properly, with supplementation.

Edited by sam988, 19 April 2008 - 10:07 PM.

  • Agree x 1

#5 VictorBjoerk

  • Topic Starter
  • Member, Life Member
  • 1,763 posts
  • 91
  • Location:Sweden

Posted 19 April 2008 - 10:26 PM

Well I'll vote for 20-30 years too, Maybe 40 if done very severely and started at age 20.Does anybody know why Aubrey De Grey doesn't believe in cr?

#6 forever freedom

  • Guest
  • 2,358 posts
  • 69

Posted 19 April 2008 - 10:30 PM

Well I'll vote for 20-30 years too, Maybe 40 if done very severely and started at age 20.Does anybody know why Aubrey De Grey doesn't believe in cr?



http://www.fightagin...ives/000564.php

#7 Shepard

  • Guest, Director, Moderator
  • 6,360 posts
  • 932
  • Location:Auburn, AL

Posted 20 April 2008 - 12:05 AM

I tend to agree that CR isn't going to add anything much to maximum lifespan, but it will of course add a good bit to average lifespan.

#8 Cyberbrain

  • Guest, F@H
  • 1,755 posts
  • 2
  • Location:Thessaloniki, Greece

Posted 20 April 2008 - 02:33 AM

Voted for 20-30 years too, but it may depend on when you start too. If you start CR when you're 17 or 19 you may live to be a 110!

#9 Matt

  • Guest
  • 2,850 posts
  • 149
  • Location:United Kingdom
  • NO

Posted 20 April 2008 - 03:41 PM

Well I think that the average CRer starting at around 20 - 30 years could probably expect to easily reach 100 assuming they're not unlucky and have terrible genetic predisposition to disease. Otherwise it could just normalize life span which is good thing in it self !

I think the average age reached by long term CR would be around 110-115 years if starting at a young age. Our aging process will have been slowed and disease risk diminished that of the what we see in Super Centenarians of today... the characteristics that help a person become a super centenarian are probably present in CRers.

There is no doubt we can alter the process of aging in mice, you get two groups of genetically identical mice and calorie restrict one of them. The genes already present in an organism can allow for a nice extension of lifespan. I think max lifespan in humans could probably be extended to about 130 years, I think being very optimistic 135-140.

There was one study in Rhesus Monkeys that you might find interesting, the CR group lived on average to 32 years, but were mostly obesity avoidance group. The average Rhesus monkey lives anywhere from 25 - 27 years, similar lifespan to an ad lib humans ( 75 - 81 years). The CR group in this study lived to a human equivalent of 96 human years. This is impressive I think. It has been estimated that humans on an ad lib healthy-ish diet could live on average to 85 - 90 years WITHOUT CR. It will be very interesting to see just how the real anti aging CR diet monkeys do.

This study below showed that CR Monkeys gained 7 years of extra life which is equivalent to humans gaining 21 years of extra life.


Mortality and Morbidity in Laboratory-maintained Rhesus Monkeys and Effects of Long-term Dietary Restriction
Noni L. Bodkin1, Theresa M. Alexander1, Heidi K. Ortmeyer1, Elizabeth Johnson2 and Barbara C. Hansen1

1 Obesity and Diabetes Research Center, Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore.
2 Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.

Mortality and morbidity were examined in 117 laboratory-maintained rhesus monkeys studied over approximately 25 years (8 dietary-restricted [DR] and 109 ad libitum-fed [AL] monkeys). During the study, 49 AL monkeys and 3 DR monkeys died. Compared with the DR monkeys, the AL monkeys had a 2.6-fold increased risk of death. Hyperinsulinemia led to a 3.7-fold increased risk of death (p <.05); concordantly, the risk of death decreased by 7%, per unit increase in insulin sensitivity (M). There was significant organ pathology in the AL at death. The age at median survival in the AL was approximately 25 years compared with 32 years in the DR. The oldest monkey was a diabetic female (AL) that lived to be 40 years of age. These results suggest that dietary restriction leads to an increased average age of death in primates, associated with the prevention of hyperinsulinemia and the mitigation of age-related disease.

Edited by Matt, 20 April 2008 - 03:57 PM.


#10 Matt

  • Guest
  • 2,850 posts
  • 149
  • Location:United Kingdom
  • NO

Posted 20 April 2008 - 03:50 PM

Less than 5 years for CR?


I thought this was an interesting article

Healthy living 'can add 14 years'
http://news.bbc.co.u...lth/7174665.stm

This is also an interesting video on risk factors and reaching mid 80's (9 risk factors) -- this study was in JAMA

http://seniorjournal...rchersLearn.htm

There is also a video there too.

Edited by Matt, 20 April 2008 - 03:52 PM.


#11 Athanasios

  • Guest
  • 2,616 posts
  • 163
  • Location:Texas

Posted 20 April 2008 - 05:14 PM

There should be a differentiation between extended average lifespan and max lifespan.

#12 VictorBjoerk

  • Topic Starter
  • Member, Life Member
  • 1,763 posts
  • 91
  • Location:Sweden

Posted 20 April 2008 - 11:33 PM

There should be a differentiation between extended average lifespan and max lifespan.


If the cr diet could add extra years to people predisposed to longevity in the supercentenarian range maybe some people could live to 150.

Does anyone here believe that cr could have the same effect to people with supercentenarian genes or do you think that they already enjoy the eventual benefits of cr due to their genes?

maybe a little off topic but does anybody here how many cr practioners there are in the world?I'm talking about people doing it actively motivated by the results on lab animals.

Who in the cr society have currently done cr for the longest time and since when?

Edited by Michael, 03 January 2010 - 12:57 PM.


#13 Matt

  • Guest
  • 2,850 posts
  • 149
  • Location:United Kingdom
  • NO

Posted 21 April 2008 - 12:34 PM

There are only claims of people doing it for decades, one guy named apparently started CR in his 50-60s and lived to 103-104 years (dont remember). Otherwise I think people that claim to do it the longest are Brian Delaney, Lisa Walford, Paul McGlothin, Meredith Averill [CR'd for 14 years) are just a few. Michael. R is probably closing up to 10 years now.

CR Society claim around 2000 people however than number is likely to be wrong [in my opinion]. People who are actively doing CRON properly are probably less than 500.

Edited by Matt, 21 April 2008 - 12:37 PM.


#14 VictorBjoerk

  • Topic Starter
  • Member, Life Member
  • 1,763 posts
  • 91
  • Location:Sweden

Posted 21 April 2008 - 09:13 PM

Matt:Who was that guy who lived to 104 and started cr at age 50-60,He can't have been counting calories seriously like Michael Rae? If I'm right noone could have been doing CR intentionally before 1985 because it was then Roy Walford made it more known to public...

#15 Shepard

  • Guest, Director, Moderator
  • 6,360 posts
  • 932
  • Location:Auburn, AL

Posted 21 April 2008 - 09:29 PM

If I'm right noone could have been doing CR intentionally before 1985 because it was then Roy Walford made it more known to public...


People have been skipping meals and the like for a long time. In Poor Richard's Almanack, Franklin makes mention of stuff like this multiple times. Even in Shakespeare, there are implications to the benefits of hunger. Which are only two among tons of comments throughout literature about energy restriction.

#16 bacopa

  • Validating/Suspended
  • 2,223 posts
  • 159
  • Location:Boston

Posted 21 April 2008 - 10:03 PM

I voted 5 to 10 years because I don't think it's like stem cell therapy or SENS I think it could help to normaizlize the lifestyle.

#17 VictorBjoerk

  • Topic Starter
  • Member, Life Member
  • 1,763 posts
  • 91
  • Location:Sweden

Posted 22 April 2008 - 05:36 PM

Christian Mortensen had a history of always eating moderately,he was also a vegetarian(wouldn't it have been quite unusual having such a lifestyle during all his life by the way). He has had no history of longevity in his family as far as I've read.

#18 openeyes

  • Guest
  • 120 posts
  • 12
  • Location:Chapel Hill, NC

Posted 10 May 2008 - 05:49 AM

Matt:Who was that guy who lived to 104 and started cr at age 50-60


He might be referring to Luigi Cornaro, who wrote Discourses on a Sober Life centuries ago.

#19 Matt

  • Guest
  • 2,850 posts
  • 149
  • Location:United Kingdom
  • NO

Posted 10 May 2008 - 01:06 PM

No I was talking about Ralph who recently just died at 104.

learn more here http://livingthecrway.com/

#20 VictorBjoerk

  • Topic Starter
  • Member, Life Member
  • 1,763 posts
  • 91
  • Location:Sweden

Posted 10 May 2008 - 02:14 PM

I can find much information about Ralph and his cr practice on the page.

can't

Edited by Shonghow, 10 May 2008 - 02:13 PM.


#21 VictorBjoerk

  • Topic Starter
  • Member, Life Member
  • 1,763 posts
  • 91
  • Location:Sweden

Posted 10 May 2008 - 08:37 PM

Are there any anecdotes about lifelong anorexia sufferers getting health and longevity benefits when they have recovered?I'm not thinking of the 70 pound dying skeletons.Rather I think about the numerous women like Victoria Beckham who stays extremely thin but probably eats a balanced diet with adequate nutrition.

#22 Matt

  • Guest
  • 2,850 posts
  • 149
  • Location:United Kingdom
  • NO

Posted 10 May 2008 - 10:31 PM

Are there any anecdotes about lifelong anorexia sufferers getting health and longevity benefits when they have recovered?I'm not thinking of the 70 pound dying skeletons.Rather I think about the numerous women like Victoria Beckham who stays extremely thin but probably eats a balanced diet with adequate nutrition.


I think people like her could potentially have CR markers, well, they probably will because CR and AN share some common things, but differ in the quality of nutrition and severity of restriction.

Here is one guy who only eats ONE MEAL per day, name is Sir Cliff Richard and is now 67. This photo was taken when he was 65 years old.

The problem is that there is such pressure from the media when celebs get real skinny, even with the help of personal nutritionists and whatever.... that eventually they break the CR and is never a life long thing.

This is from a news article on Cliff

"DAVID FROST: Well you do look like Peter Pan and is it, do you think, since it's not nip and tuck is it, is it swimming, is it tennis, is it diet, you've been on a diet 35 years?

CLIFF RICHARD: Yeah well an eating regime more than a diet.

DAVID FROST: Yes.

CLIFF RICHARD: I mean I try not to eat more than one meal a day and I've stuck by that pretty, pretty religiously right the way through and I don't see myself as the Peter Pan of pop anymore, I keep saying the Rip Van Winkle of rock, but Peter Pan of pop was a great pleasure to hear people call me that originally, but once I hit 40, then 50 and now 60 it's really a bit of a pressure. "

http://news.bbc.co.u...ost/1956448.stm

Attached Files


Edited by Matt, 10 May 2008 - 10:36 PM.


#23 VictorBjoerk

  • Topic Starter
  • Member, Life Member
  • 1,763 posts
  • 91
  • Location:Sweden

Posted 10 May 2008 - 11:46 PM

Evidence is going to come in a few decades when these celebrities hit's their 50's 60's etc...If no breakthrough in medicine arrives before that of course.

#24 Matt

  • Guest
  • 2,850 posts
  • 149
  • Location:United Kingdom
  • NO

Posted 10 May 2008 - 11:50 PM

Evidence is going to come in a few decades when these celebrities hit's their 50's 60's etc...If no breakthrough in medicine arrives before that of course.


I don't think we'll ever get the answer to whether CR really does work in humans, technologies to enhance human longevity will probably come long before the 20-30 year old CRers reach old age.

#25 VictorBjoerk

  • Topic Starter
  • Member, Life Member
  • 1,763 posts
  • 91
  • Location:Sweden

Posted 12 May 2008 - 05:27 PM

Evidence is going to come in a few decades when these celebrities hit's their 50's 60's etc...If no breakthrough in medicine arrives before that of course.


I don't think we'll ever get the answer to whether CR really does work in humans, technologies to enhance human longevity will probably come long before the 20-30 year old CRers reach old age.


If you really think so,why are you doing it?Is it just for minimizing disease risks and improve your current health?

#26 forever freedom

  • Guest
  • 2,358 posts
  • 69

Posted 12 May 2008 - 06:00 PM

Evidence is going to come in a few decades when these celebrities hit's their 50's 60's etc...If no breakthrough in medicine arrives before that of course.


I don't think we'll ever get the answer to whether CR really does work in humans, technologies to enhance human longevity will probably come long before the 20-30 year old CRers reach old age.


If you really think so,why are you doing it?Is it just for minimizing disease risks and improve your current health?



I guess he does it because of pure risk management. A good margin of safety is always something desirable. Lol i'm reading a book on investing right now but the concept of managing risks (like in this case predicting that life extending tech will come in 30 years but just in case preserving oneself to be able to wait for much more time in case the technologies take longer to come) makes sense in almost every subject.

#27 VictorBjoerk

  • Topic Starter
  • Member, Life Member
  • 1,763 posts
  • 91
  • Location:Sweden

Posted 12 May 2008 - 07:04 PM

Yes and CR is currently the only way to potentially delay aging a little as far as I understand.

#28 Mewtwo

  • Guest
  • 15 posts
  • 0

Posted 21 May 2008 - 11:40 PM

I have been Calorie Restricting for years and it is working as far as I can tell.

I never get sick anymore, and I feel very focused and alive.

(I restrict to 800-1100 Calories/day)

And I read that supplementation is really not a good idea, because it may block the physiological response that you are trying to get from restriction.

#29 forever freedom

  • Guest
  • 2,358 posts
  • 69

Posted 21 May 2008 - 11:43 PM

I have been Calorie Restricting for years and it is working as far as I can tell.

I never get sick anymore, and I feel very focused and alive.

(I restrict to 800-1100 Calories/day)

And I read that supplementation is really not a good idea, because it may block the physiological response that you are trying to get from restriction.




So you get no supp at all?

#30 VictorBjoerk

  • Topic Starter
  • Member, Life Member
  • 1,763 posts
  • 91
  • Location:Sweden

Posted 21 May 2008 - 11:53 PM

I have been Calorie Restricting for years and it is working as far as I can tell.

I never get sick anymore, and I feel very focused and alive.

(I restrict to 800-1100 Calories/day)

And I read that supplementation is really not a good idea, because it may block the physiological response that you are trying to get from restriction.



800-1100 sounds very low.Even for Cr.Although I don't know your body size..What kind of supplements should be the most contraproductive to CR?




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users