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Social anxiety supplements


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#1 Cless986

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Posted 16 April 2010 - 04:12 AM


Hi, I suffer from social anxiety, specially when talking to women. My hands starts to shake and I stutter,
it has made my life difficult and lame but from tips and help from my friends and experience, the social anxiety is more tolerable now.
I tried to search for supplements that can help me, but there a lots of stuff like st wort, kava, 5htp, etc
and the only thing that I already bought is a tea that contains kava, but no noticeable effects at all...
what supplements are good for me? I found herbal remedies that has many ingredients like amoryn and seredyn, but there a lot of "suspicious reviews" outthere and this is the only website that i really on.
thanks

#2 Charmion

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Posted 16 April 2010 - 04:17 AM

Have you had your testosterone levels checked?

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#3 Lufega

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Posted 16 April 2010 - 04:30 AM

Check out this site. Lots of good info. www.socialanxietysupport.com

#4 TigerMask

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Posted 16 April 2010 - 05:07 AM

Unfortunately, only you will know what supplements 'are good for you.' I've been through many supplements and read many recommendations. Supplements produce different results for everyone.

With that, the two things that I find really beneficial to tremors/shaking:
Magnesium Malate (Or Citrate, but I prefer Malate)
Calcium Citrate (or any other good form of Calcium)

Take these in nearly identical doses. Take %25 or %50 of the daily value of both, together, a few times a day. I just do %50 DV of Calcium and %50 DV of Magnesium once a day. This is the one thing that has helped me.

Again, always remember: Supplements produce different results for everyone.

Edited by TigerMask, 16 April 2010 - 05:07 AM.


#5 tlm884

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Posted 16 April 2010 - 05:46 AM

Hi, I suffer from social anxiety, specially when talking to women. My hands starts to shake and I stutter,
it has made my life difficult and lame but from tips and help from my friends and experience, the social anxiety is more tolerable now.
I tried to search for supplements that can help me, but there a lots of stuff like st wort, kava, 5htp, etc
and the only thing that I already bought is a tea that contains kava, but no noticeable effects at all...
what supplements are good for me? I found herbal remedies that has many ingredients like amoryn and seredyn, but there a lot of "suspicious reviews" outthere and this is the only website that i really on.
thanks


Have you trying CBT?

#6 TigerMask

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Posted 16 April 2010 - 06:27 AM

Unfortunately, only you will know what supplements 'are good for you.' I've been through many supplements and read many recommendations. Supplements produce different results for everyone.

With that, the two things that I find really beneficial to tremors/shaking:
Magnesium Malate (Or Citrate, but I prefer Malate)
Calcium Citrate (or any other good form of Calcium)

Take these in nearly identical doses. Take %25 or %50 of the daily value of both, together, a few times a day. I just do %50 DV of Calcium and %50 DV of Magnesium once a day. This is the one thing that has helped me.

Again, always remember: Supplements produce different results for everyone.


Sorry, disregard the above post. I just read that the right ratio to take these two minerals is 2:1 calcium:magnesium.

At 1:1, like I take it, it can cause the body to slow down with daytime sleepiness and shallow breathing.

Looks like I have to adjust the way I take them. I still have A LOT to learn. I still recommend Magnesium Malate and Calcium Citrate for your issues. I feel much better when I am taking these minerals.

#7 rwac

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Posted 16 April 2010 - 06:44 AM

Sorry, disregard the above post. I just read that the right ratio to take these two minerals is 2:1 calcium:magnesium.

At 1:1, like I take it, it can cause the body to slow down with daytime sleepiness and shallow breathing.


Most people don't actually have a big need for calcium, so be wary of taking large amounts of supplemental calcium.
If it doesn't make you sleepy, why do you worry about it ?

#8 rephore

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Posted 16 April 2010 - 07:45 AM

I take Spike when I go clubbing. It works for me.

#9 Lufega

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Posted 16 April 2010 - 05:45 PM

I spent a lot of time researching social anxiety. The only thing that truly ever helped me was manganese. For a while, lecithin granules also worked when I used it sublingually.

#10 thevaughny

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Posted 16 April 2010 - 06:00 PM

I spent a lot of time researching social anxiety. The only thing that truly ever helped me was manganese. For a while, lecithin granules also worked when I used it sublingually.


Interested I've never heard of manganese for anxiety. Do you have an links to reading material?

#11 Matt

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Posted 16 April 2010 - 06:24 PM

Mangesium...

then just go out and interact with people, step at a time. Its the best way :-)

#12 rwac

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Posted 16 April 2010 - 06:40 PM

Mangesium...


Were you thinking of Mn or Mg ?

I think Manganese works quite well for me.

Edited by rwac, 16 April 2010 - 06:55 PM.


#13 Alex Libman

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Posted 16 April 2010 - 06:49 PM

I've been "suffering" from "social anxiety disorder" all my life - or so the psychologists would tell me. But the truth is that it never kept me from doing what I wanted to do - I just honestly don't care to do those things. My introverted personality is a part of who I am, and it made it possible for me to focus on my intellectual development a lot more rather than wasting time on other people. In fact I believe that introverted people tend to be intellectually, emotionally, and morally superior to the "social butterflies" who live for and through other people!

Your mind is trying to tell you something! Don't fall for collectivist pressure to conform! A person who seeks happiness through other people is building his house on top of quicksand. Drugging yourself stupid to overcome your inhibitions to conformity will not make you a better human being, only a more gullible one and easier for others to control. Wisdom, peace, and happiness can only come from within!

#14 Sciolaro

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Posted 16 April 2010 - 07:01 PM

I've been on a Lithium Aspartate trial run the past few days. It's been great for reducing my general anxiety. At 5mg, I'm not sure how much is attributable to the placebo affect (especially since my understanding is that lithium levels may not truly be affected for a week or more), but I'm looking forward to continuing its use.

Edited by Sciolaro, 16 April 2010 - 07:01 PM.


#15 Jurence

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Posted 16 April 2010 - 07:22 PM

L-Theanine- its very cheap and very calming.

#16 Alex Libman

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Posted 16 April 2010 - 07:44 PM

I tried 5-HTP and (unless I'm confusing it with something) L-Theanine ~6 years ago - screwed me up even worse.

#17 Logan

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Posted 16 April 2010 - 09:24 PM

I've been "suffering" from "social anxiety disorder" all my life - or so the psychologists would tell me. But the truth is that it never kept me from doing what I wanted to do - I just honestly don't care to do those things. My introverted personality is a part of who I am, and it made it possible for me to focus on my intellectual development a lot more rather than wasting time on other people. In fact I believe that introverted people tend to be intellectually, emotionally, and morally superior to the "social butterflies" who live for and through other people!

Your mind is trying to tell you something! Don't fall for collectivist pressure to conform! A person who seeks happiness through other people is building his house on top of quicksand. Drugging yourself stupid to overcome your inhibitions to conformity will not make you a better human being, only a more gullible one and easier for others to control. Wisdom, peace, and happiness can only come from within!


While you make some good points and have obviously learned to gain the most out of your personality type, I'm afraid you may be way off course on this one. I know many many people that are fairly extroverted, have many friends, and engage in social activities fairly often that are also very wise, intelligent, educated, empathic, and compassionate. I think you have missed out on something that can only enhance quality of life. Being co dependent is not a good thing, but being able to connect with people on an intimate level and form positive relationships is necessary for a truly fullfilling life. I think you may be in a bit of a state of denial in order to justify yourself and your life. Maybe I am misinterpreting some of what you are saying. Sorry if I am.
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#18 Imagination

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Posted 16 April 2010 - 10:08 PM

I also recommend magnesium as previously mentioned. It's the best thing for anxiety I think, bog standard stuff in the supermarket will do.

I suffer from bad anxiety when I get hangovers from alcohol, and magnesium usually sorts it out straight away.

#19 ramon25

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Posted 16 April 2010 - 10:18 PM

I vote for manganese aswell. I theorize it might have to do with a copper antagonist effect.

#20 Animal

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Posted 16 April 2010 - 11:27 PM

I've been "suffering" from "social anxiety disorder" all my life - or so the psychologists would tell me. But the truth is that it never kept me from doing what I wanted to do - I just honestly don't care to do those things. My introverted personality is a part of who I am, and it made it possible for me to focus on my intellectual development a lot more rather than wasting time on other people. In fact I believe that introverted people tend to be intellectually, emotionally, and morally superior to the "social butterflies" who live for and through other people!

Your mind is trying to tell you something! Don't fall for collectivist pressure to conform! A person who seeks happiness through other people is building his house on top of quicksand. Drugging yourself stupid to overcome your inhibitions to conformity will not make you a better human being, only a more gullible one and easier for others to control. Wisdom, peace, and happiness can only come from within!


While you make some good points and have obviously learned to gain the most out of your personality type, I'm afraid you may be way off course on this one. I know many many people that are fairly extroverted, have many friends, and engage in social activities fairly often that are also very wise, intelligent, educated, empathic, and compassionate. I think you have missed out on something that can only enhance quality of life. Being co dependent is not a good thing, but being able to connect with people on an intimate level and form positive relationships is necessary for a truly fullfilling life. I think you may be in a bit of a state of denial in order to justify yourself and your life. Maybe I am misinterpreting some of what you are saying. Sorry if I am.


I agree, Alex says that he "believes that introverted people tend to be intellectually, emotionally, and morally superior to the "social butterflies"", yet if he rarely interacts with people, and has no close personal relationships his generalisation is based on nothing more then a delusional need to justify his behaviour to himself. Social anxiety is a disorder that results in an inability to interact with people without experiencing uncomfortable physical/emotional symptoms. It hardly has anything to do with what Alex effectively describes as social apathy, this is something else entirely and I would expect it is related to dysthymia or a less severe subclass of autism. There is a world of difference between a gregarious exhibitionist (or social butterfly), and the more typical socially active individual.

It is healthy to have social contact, it is the primary mechanism whereby we gain validation and moderation of our thoughts and actions. It is not a coincidence that individuals who eventually develop serious psychological disorders tend to be isolationist. I actually think it is cowardice to shy away from social contact by choice, because it primarily stems from a fear of rejection, rejection of your thoughts and ideas, and rejection of your physical self. Only those recreant misanthropes who wish to wallow in self-edifying intellectual masturbation truly make the conscious choice to shun society; I hope that is not the case with Alex.

#21 winston

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Posted 17 April 2010 - 12:14 AM

Try MoodGYM online free CBT. If you want.

I've tried lots of supplements for this without any effects, besides phenibut, but that stopped working after a while (not tolerance, just stopped working period).

Going to try wellbutrin and zoloft shortly.

#22 Alex Libman

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Posted 17 April 2010 - 12:24 AM

I've been "suffering" from "social anxiety disorder" all my life - or so the psychologists would tell me. But the truth is that it never kept me from doing what I wanted to do - I just honestly don't care to do those things. My introverted personality is a part of who I am, and it made it possible for me to focus on my intellectual development a lot more rather than wasting time on other people. In fact I believe that introverted people tend to be intellectually, emotionally, and morally superior to the "social butterflies" who live for and through other people!

Your mind is trying to tell you something! Don't fall for collectivist pressure to conform! A person who seeks happiness through other people is building his house on top of quicksand. Drugging yourself stupid to overcome your inhibitions to conformity will not make you a better human being, only a more gullible one and easier for others to control. Wisdom, peace, and happiness can only come from within!


While you make some good points and have obviously learned to gain the most out of your personality type, I'm afraid you may be way off course on this one. I know many many people that are fairly extroverted, have many friends, and engage in social activities fairly often that are also very wise, intelligent, educated, empathic, and compassionate. I think you have missed out on something that can only enhance quality of life. Being co dependent is not a good thing, but being able to connect with people on an intimate level and form positive relationships is necessary for a truly fullfilling life. I think you may be in a bit of a state of denial in order to justify yourself and your life. Maybe I am misinterpreting some of what you are saying. Sorry if I am.


I agree, Alex says that he "believes that introverted people tend to be intellectually, emotionally, and morally superior to the "social butterflies"", yet if he rarely interacts with people, and has no close personal relationships his generalisation is based on nothing more then a delusional need to justify his behaviour to himself. Social anxiety is a disorder that results in an inability to interact with people without experiencing uncomfortable physical/emotional symptoms. It hardly has anything to do with what Alex effectively describes as social apathy, this is something else entirely and I would expect it is related to dysthymia or a less severe subclass of autism. There is a world of difference between a gregarious exhibitionist (or social butterfly), and the more typical socially active individual.

It is healthy to have social contact, it is the primary mechanism whereby we gain validation and moderation of our thoughts and actions. It is not a coincidence that individuals who eventually develop serious psychological disorders tend to be isolationist. I actually think it is cowardice to shy away from social contact by choice, because it primarily stems from a fear of rejection, rejection of your thoughts and ideas, and rejection of your physical self. Only those recreant misanthropes who wish to wallow in self-edifying intellectual masturbation truly make the conscious choice to shun society; I hope that is not the case with Alex.


I just wanted to put in my two cents worth of ranting and raving on this subject, as I am generally biased to amplifying the point of view that might otherwise be overlooked. I only besmirched "'social butterflies' who live for and through other people" - if socialization is what fits your personal values then my criticism doesn't apply as much. So I'm not against people taking supplements or prescription medication against social anxiety disorder, I'd just encourage them to consider if that's really what they themselves want to do, as opposed to being pressured into it by others, which is very often the case.

Personally I was very sociable as a child and had a large number of friends, but I became more introverted as a teenager when I discovered computers, and through them the ability to learn new things on my own terms. (Immigration from Moscow to New Jersey also played some part in my introversion, but that's a separate discussion, and you can see that my English skills did not suffer from lack of direct socialization by much.) I wasn't shy or socially awkward at the last dozen parties I went to - I was simply bored out of my mind!

I think it is an inevitable consequence of intellectual progress to spend more of one's time processing written or prerecorded information, because that is the medium in which sophisticated information can be communicated, stored, searched, and recalled most efficiently. This inevitably leads to less time for IRL professional friendships, and various athletic and entertainment-related pursuits can also be more enjoyable individually, because as the realm of interest options expands the odds of you and your friends enjoying something on equal terms as you diminishes.

And don't knock "wallowing in self-edifying intellectual masturbation"- that's intellectual exploration of someone I love! ;)

Edited by Alex Libman, 17 April 2010 - 12:30 AM.


#23 Animal

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Posted 17 April 2010 - 12:39 AM

Well at least you love yourself, that's healthy as long as it doesn't progress to narcissism. ;)

In actual fact you seem rather well adjusted for someone who advocates being insular, so I don't think my tirade particularly applies to you. I suppose you're just on the far left of the bell curve when it comes to socially dependent equanimity, rather then being someone who has a personality disorder.

#24 TigerMask

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Posted 17 April 2010 - 02:35 AM

Sorry, disregard the above post. I just read that the right ratio to take these two minerals is 2:1 calcium:magnesium.

At 1:1, like I take it, it can cause the body to slow down with daytime sleepiness and shallow breathing.


Most people don't actually have a big need for calcium, so be wary of taking large amounts of supplemental calcium.
If it doesn't make you sleepy, why do you worry about it ?


Right. Good point. I've been taking 1:1, which is probably fine for me. I've had tests done, and both magnesium and calcium are in the high range (still within the recommended limits), but this is after I had been supplementing them for a long time. I keep my daily intake of calcium below 500 mg.

I take it at night. I do have daytime sleepiness, but I've had this for a while. I've been out of magnesium for a few days, so I haven't been taking either.

And yeah, my anxiety AND depression have both been worse since I ran out of the magnesium. Will be ordering more soon.

Anyway, magnesium and calcium have definitely helped me with some of my anxiety. Might be more the magnesium, I could try supplementing with just that for a while, but I've always done well with taking the two of them together.

Other things that may have helped:
Taurine
Inositol
Theanine
Glutamine
Niacinamide

Of all those, taurine and inositol seem to be my favorites. Your mileage may vary. Remember that these aren't going to be as effective as many prescription medications. And there can still be side effects or undesirable effects with supplements, just like with medication.

I'd really like to get a supplement forum started that is just for mental issues. Anyone interested in something like that?

#25 Cless986

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Posted 17 April 2010 - 02:39 AM

Have you had your testosterone levels checked?

no, but I think that I have low T, but I am taking zinc for that.

And thanks everybody for their help, didnt know that magnesium helps for the tremors, I will find some
later. but I am not sure of what kind of magnesium I need.

Edited by Cless986, 17 April 2010 - 02:45 AM.


#26 Cless986

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Posted 17 April 2010 - 02:45 AM

I take Spike when I go clubbing. It works for me.


nah, the caffeine makes the hands tremors worse.

#27 TigerMask

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Posted 17 April 2010 - 02:55 AM

I've been "suffering" from "social anxiety disorder" all my life - or so the psychologists would tell me. But the truth is that it never kept me from doing what I wanted to do - I just honestly don't care to do those things. My introverted personality is a part of who I am, and it made it possible for me to focus on my intellectual development a lot more rather than wasting time on other people. In fact I believe that introverted people tend to be intellectually, emotionally, and morally superior to the "social butterflies" who live for and through other people!

Your mind is trying to tell you something! Don't fall for collectivist pressure to conform! A person who seeks happiness through other people is building his house on top of quicksand. Drugging yourself stupid to overcome your inhibitions to conformity will not make you a better human being, only a more gullible one and easier for others to control. Wisdom, peace, and happiness can only come from within!


I think many people who have social anxiety, try too hard to be liked by others and have unrealistically high expectations of social encounters. Like they're struggling and fighting with their introverted nature, trying to be the life of the party as an extrovert. They may do this by drinking or doing drugs. This is why some people with social anxiety struggle with addiction: It helps them put on the disguise of an extrovert for a little while.

Clearly, it seems, you've become comfortable with being an introvert. Becoming comfortable with this, meditating on this, is probably one of the best things someone who thinks they're struggling with social anxiety can do.

#28 Cless986

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Posted 17 April 2010 - 03:03 AM

I've been "suffering" from "social anxiety disorder" all my life - or so the psychologists would tell me. But the truth is that it never kept me from doing what I wanted to do - I just honestly don't care to do those things. My introverted personality is a part of who I am, and it made it possible for me to focus on my intellectual development a lot more rather than wasting time on other people. In fact I believe that introverted people tend to be intellectually, emotionally, and morally superior to the "social butterflies" who live for and through other people!

Your mind is trying to tell you something! Don't fall for collectivist pressure to conform! A person who seeks happiness through other people is building his house on top of quicksand. Drugging yourself stupid to overcome your inhibitions to conformity will not make you a better human being, only a more gullible one and easier for others to control. Wisdom, peace, and happiness can only come from within!


I think many people who have social anxiety, try too hard to be liked by others and have unrealistically high expectations of social encounters. Like they're struggling and fighting with their introverted nature, trying to be the life of the party as an extrovert. They may do this by drinking or doing drugs. This is why some people with social anxiety struggle with addiction: It helps them put on the disguise of an extrovert for a little while.

Clearly, it seems, you've become comfortable with being an introvert. Becoming comfortable with this, meditating on this, is probably one of the best things someone who thinks they're struggling with social anxiety can do.


I agree, but I am still young and it seems that every extrovert has the best things that life can offer and they seem happy about it, some are shallow and dumb, but happy.

#29 TigerMask

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Posted 17 April 2010 - 03:03 AM

Have you had your testosterone levels checked?

no, but I think that I have low T, but I am taking zinc for that.

And thanks everybody for their help, didnt know that magnesium helps for the tremors, I will find some
later. but I am not sure of what kind of magnesium I need.


Try magnesium malate. This is the product that I take:

http://www.iherb.com...sules/1268?at=0


Probably should take a little calcium citrate with that. Magnesium citrate is also helpful, and I'm probably going to take BOTH citrate and malate in the future. For anxiety, I think I prefer magnesium malate. Give it a try!

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#30 TigerMask

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Posted 17 April 2010 - 03:50 AM

Maybe you tried this already, but...

http://www.google.co...bcdf8cbbf06dc4f
http://www.imminst.o.....lite=+anxiety

Hope that helps.

Edited by TigerMask, 17 April 2010 - 03:54 AM.





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