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graduated cylinders which are safe with organic solvents

equipment mixing solvents limonene dmso

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#1 ClarkSims

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Posted 17 April 2013 - 11:43 PM


I bought this set because I thought it was glass


http://www.mansionsc...-set-13362.html

It shipped to me, and it is plastic.

I am wondering if it will be safe to use limonene or dmso in these cylinders.

I have been mixing C60/OO with limonene for applying to my skin.

Does anyone have an opinion?

Edited by ClarkSims, 17 April 2013 - 11:45 PM.


#2 niner

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 06:00 PM

Do you know what kind of plastic it is? Does it have a recycling code number?

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#3 ClarkSims

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Posted 19 April 2013 - 02:19 PM

I couldn't find any information on the cylinders or the box. I will ask the company that sold them.

#4 hav

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Posted 21 April 2013 - 06:58 PM

When I picked up 15 ml centrifuge tubes they were not marked with a number either but were a soft translucent plastic similar to a #5 container. The tops were harder more brittle plastic like a #2. Neither has shown any discoloration after allot of c60/oo exposure. Only problem is the white outside markings softened and wiped away after exposure to the olive oil. I have not had that issue with pyrex and bomex glass beakers. Or Autofil containers which are a very clear thin brittle plastic.

Howard

#5 ClarkSims

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 12:31 AM

I finally found the recycling number. One of the smaller tubes, is marked as recycling number 7. The came to me, inside one another, like matricia dolls. The outer cylinder is not marked.

Should a #7 be resistant against lemonene? How about DMSO?

#6 david ellis

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 01:47 PM

I finally found the recycling number. One of the smaller tubes, is marked as recycling number 7. The came to me, inside one another, like matricia dolls. The outer cylinder is not marked.

Should a #7 be resistant against lemonene? How about DMSO?



My plastic bottle of d-limonene has a code of 1.

#7 niner

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 02:33 AM

I finally found the recycling number. One of the smaller tubes, is marked as recycling number 7. The came to me, inside one another, like matricia dolls. The outer cylinder is not marked.

Should a #7 be resistant against lemonene? How about DMSO?


7 is "other", which could be a lot of things. I would think that general purpose labware would be able to withstand typical reagents and solvents, but I suppose it would be best to ask the manufacturer. Here's a nice chemical compatibility list.

#8 hav

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 02:54 PM

I just got some nalgene ones that look pretty good. Made of polyproylene. I went with the plastic over glass because they're lighter. I like the fact the the markings are molded into the plastic.

Howard

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#9 david ellis

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 06:52 PM

I just got some nalgene ones that look pretty good. Made of polyproylene. I went with the plastic over glass because they're lighter. I like the fact the the markings are molded into the plastic.

Howard


The folks that sell and ship d-limonene don't like nalgene for shipping or storage.

":Using plastics other than PET/PETG or fluorinated HDPE for transport or storage, such as Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE), Polypropylene (PP), Polystyrene (PS), or Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) is not recommended.

Some examples of incompatible packaging are: Cubitainer®, Round Open Head 5 Gallon Paint Pails, Bway® Steel Pints/Quarts/Gallon containers, Kautex® Jerrycans, Kautex® Agrochemical Bottles, Nalgene® Bottles & Containers (untreated), Nalgene® Nvision, Polystyrene Vials, Open or Tight Head Unlined Steel Pails."


If you put d-limonene in a non-recommended plastic, it will take time, something less than half a ski season(my ski shop would know how long better than me - its a marvel for removing very hard & soft waxes), to melt its way out of the container. So, probably, a quick experiment , unhampered by reaction could be successful. This stuff is a strong solvent, be careful when cleaning, it will melt the polyurethane coating on wood floors, it will melt paints. You should do your own research, I used it on a leather couch and cleaned the color off.





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