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What can cause excessive CRH or ACTH

crh acth

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#1 farshad

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Posted 16 May 2018 - 03:36 AM


So I think something in my body is causing high levels of either ACTH OR CRH.... I dont know how but thats why I made this thread maybe someone here can help me find out what could be causing either of these 2 in excess? The only thing I can think of is a CRH/ACTH -Secreting tumor? I found some studies and it is very rare but say   I had it, am I correct in thinking that it would cause 24/7 anxiety? I did a bran scan recently but it was normal but next im doing a FULL body scan. Im wondering would a CRH/ACTH-Secreting tumor cause anxiety? Or cant it Cross the BBB? Im assuming the CRH or ACTH released from the tumor if it is outside of the brain would have to make its way into the brain if its in like the stomach?

And again what else could cause high CRH/ACTH levels caused by the body'? 



#2 farshad

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 05:37 AM

So I have mutations in CRHR1MGC57346-CRHR1 2.35CRHR1-IT1 (CRHR1 intronic transcript 1), Wtf  are the last 2????


Edited by farshad, 17 May 2018 - 05:37 AM.


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#3 farshad

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 07:11 AM

If you are able to increase cortisol will that decrease CRH? Since its like a negative feedback? 



#4 farshad

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Posted 18 May 2018 - 07:08 PM

So only things I can think of that could cause too much CRH that your body cant handle would be autoimmune disease, CRH-secreting tumor or HPA Axis  disease. Am I correct?

 


#5 farshad

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Posted 19 May 2018 - 02:08 PM

So I saw this: http://www.psypost.o...l-anxiety-47544

Researchers discover how the brain turns chronic stress into pathological anxiety-CB1-CRHR1 Mutations

 

I have mutations both in my CB1  ( cannabinoid 1 receptors ) and on selfdecode it says its better to have this increased, but I dont know if the mutations means I have low or high CB1 , assuming its low,+ I have CRHR1 mutations , it says on selfdecode that its best to have this decreased but then again  it doesent mention if my mutation causes the crhr1 gene to be increased or decreased... assuming it causes the CB1 to be decreased then I assume it causes the CRF1 to be decreased also? then my anxiety wouldnt stem from this, But if CB1 mutation is decreased and the CRHR1 mutation is increased then this could be the potential cause of my anxiety,

 

So all in all if we look at these mutations I have and then look at the article..... either I have a CRH tumor or my anxiety stems from the 2 mutations...

 


Edited by farshad, 19 May 2018 - 02:12 PM.


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#6 farshad

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Posted 20 May 2018 - 02:06 PM

The HPA axis
Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is secreted by a hypothalamic
region called the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and
acts on CRH receptors in the anterior pituitary to cause the
release of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) into the
blood. ACTH acts on the adrenal cortex, which produces
and releases cortisol into the blood and participates in maintaining
homeostasis throughout the body. CRH also activates
the locus ceruleus (LC) which utilizes norepinephrine (NE) and
causes further stimulation of the PVN and subsequent release
of CRH. It also stimulates the amygdala, which is part of the
limbic system.

 

Hypothalamic Disease

A disease or disorder of the hypothalamus is known as a hypothalamic disease. A physical injury to the head that impacts the hypothalamus is one of the most common causes of hypothalamic disease.
Hypothalamic diseases can include appetite and sleep disorders, but because the hypothalamus affects so many different parts of the endocrine system, it can be hard to pinpoint whether the root cause of the disorder is actually related to another gland.
In particular, the hypothalamus and pituitary gland are so tightly connected that it’s often difficult for doctors to determine whether the condition is associated with the hypothalamus or pituitary gland. These are known as hypothalamic-pituitary disorders. However, there are hormone tests that help shed light on which part of the body is the root cause.
The hypothalamus is arguably the most essential of the endocrine system. By alerting the pituitary gland to release certain hormones to the rest of the endocrine system, the hypothalamus ensures that the internal processes of your body are balanced and working as they should.

 

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