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New anti aging therapy

mitocondrya aging antiaging hidrogen sulfide

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5 replies to this topic

#1 RIURAO

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Posted 07 August 2018 - 11:33 PM


Does anyone heard something about it , or about the compunds they talk about ?
https://www.scienced...80807095140.htm

Is there any hidrogen sulfide compound wich could be delivered to the mitocondrya already on the market ?

Edited by RIURAO, 07 August 2018 - 11:34 PM.

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#2 ta5

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Posted 08 August 2018 - 12:10 AM

Garlic and some ideas in this thread:

Optimizing mitochondrial H2S for TFAM (and NMN/NAD+/SIRT-1)


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#3 XenMan

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Posted 08 August 2018 - 02:27 AM

I read about the success of NAD+ supps when combined with hydrogen sulphide, and then researched the benefits of hydrogen sulphide alone which had good results.

 

I then researched on how to increase hydrogen sulphide levels. This was very frustrating, but hours later as in the linked thread above, found NAC and Taurine the best method. Ideally you take two 600 mg doses per day of each but I take around 1 gm in the morning, due to being lazy, and having to measure out the powders.

 

As with most supps, not to reignite a discussion on another thread, it gave me a hit to start with and ‘normalised’ after a few days.

 

Unsure about mitochondrial delivery.


Edited by XenMan, 08 August 2018 - 02:30 AM.

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#4 Turnbuckle

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Posted 08 August 2018 - 03:15 AM

Rescuing senescent cells is not actually a good thing. They are still epigenetically old and thus dysfunctional.


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#5 Nate-2004

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Posted 08 August 2018 - 06:31 PM

Rescuing senescent cells is not actually a good thing. They are still epigenetically old and thus dysfunctional.

 

These were my exact thoughts when I saw this posted on /r/Longevity reddit.


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#6 XenMan

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Posted 09 August 2018 - 03:18 AM

I have no commitment either way, but as a longevity strategy ultimately what will kill you is running out of useful mitochondria or stem cells.

 

So do you do your best to reduce turnover, rescue what you can and maintain a healthy population for as long as possible to increase possible lifespan. The alternative is keeping everything at optimal level in order to have the highest level of health to prevent disease, which will reduce potential life span, but give you the best quality of life in senior years.

 

I’m leaning more towards healthspan over lifespan these days, but that may change as with new theories, mechanisms and studies emerge.

 

I’m not convinced that just because there are epigenetic changes in old cells they are always bad. Lifestyle changes can have both good and bad impacts, and if you have spent a good period of time on a protocol such as low protein and CR, rescuing old cells with epigenetic changes may be worthwhile.

 

The question is how much of a tangible difference there is to these two approaches on how long you live; my guess is not a lot.

 


Edited by XenMan, 09 August 2018 - 03:20 AM.

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Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: mitocondrya, aging, antiaging, hidrogen sulfide

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