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How to Improve Smooth Muscle movements?

vasoconstriction

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#1 farshad

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Posted 28 October 2018 - 08:22 PM


What I mean by smooth muscle movements is, best way I can explain it - when you take a computer mouse and control it with your hand, and move the cursor, how do I improve the accuracy of that? Like so I can get better aim. 

I have heard the word vasoconstriction is what I want (I think). Wikipedia says ''Vasoconstriction is the narrowing of the blood vessels '' and somehow vasoconstriction can help with accurate movements of things using your hand (or anything else).

 

Here is a list I've gathered that causes vasoconstriction or has involvement in movements:

 

Antihistamines

Acetylcholine

5-HT

VEGF etc

Nitric oxide(s)(NOS3?) <--- Causes bad movements

ACE-inducer(Angiotensin II is a vasoconstrictor. Angiotensin I is a precursor) they exist??

Beta 2 is a vasodilator so -> B2-selective beta-blocker

Endothelin-1,Prostaglandin E2 +Prostaglandin I2(Prostacyclin) and NPY 

Beta 1  stimulates renin, which produces angiotensin, which is a vasoconstrictor. 

here is a big list on wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia...tion#Endogenous

 

idk which is the most sensible method to use to help improve aim.. but my guess would be these:

A1 & A2 receptor agonism (norepinephrine & adrenaline)

Dopamine receptor 1 and 2 agonist

Inhibit NOS3 

 

I just wanna know which one has the most role in movements/aim.. any info?


Edited by farshad, 28 October 2018 - 08:23 PM.


#2 airplanepeanuts

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Posted 28 October 2018 - 09:15 PM

Accuracy of hand movement has not a lot do with vasoconstriction.


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#3 farshad

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Posted 28 October 2018 - 09:49 PM

Accuracy of hand movement has not a lot do with vasoconstriction.

so what is it? I have been told skeletal muscle but what controls the skeletal? The CNS?

 

look here https://en.wikipedia...r_smooth_muscle

 

It mentions a1 and a2 causes vasoconstriction (which Norepinephrine binds to and adrenaline)

 

also here https://en.wikipedia...#Smooth_muscles

 

''Nitric oxide (NO) is a mediator of vasodilation in blood vessels'' everything indicates that vasodilation causes bad aim and vasoconstriction opposite. In the end it is about balance .

 

https://en.wikipedia...i/Smooth_muscle



#4 farshad

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Posted 29 October 2018 - 12:26 PM

bump nobody knows what im talking about?



#5 Oakman

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Posted 29 October 2018 - 02:25 PM

I sit here with mouse in hand, as I have for the last 40 yrs, and I can't figure what you are speaking about. Do you have a tremor, which is possible at your age? Are your mouse controls not set correctly for your hand movements (slow its pointer speed, for example)? Perhaps more detailed info related to your particular problem would help, not just "what controls smooth muscle movements".



#6 farshad

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Posted 29 October 2018 - 02:46 PM

I sit here with mouse in hand, as I have for the last 40 yrs, and I can't figure what you are speaking about. Do you have a tremor, which is possible at your age? Are your mouse controls not set correctly for your hand movements (slow its pointer speed, for example)? Perhaps more detailed info related to your particular problem would help, not just "what controls smooth muscle movements".

 

this

 

How do I improve that? Like there has to be something that controls it and I came to the conclusion it has to do with smooth muscles movements /vasoconstriction

 

Some people accuracy is better than others etc , mine is VERY bad. You can say it is becuase I havent had enough practise but this is not true I have been using computers for years and still as bad as day 1. And I know some people who barely use computer and their accuracy / the way the cursor moves is way more accurate.. So I really think it has something to do with neurontransmitters or the things I mentioned in the thread. And no my mouse/settings are fine and I have no disease but I just think I lack certain critical stuff that is involved in accurate movements due to genetics.


Edited by farshad, 29 October 2018 - 02:48 PM.


#7 farshad

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Posted 18 January 2019 - 03:45 PM

i think it's called motor control or hand to eye coordination.

 



#8 Mind_Paralysis

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Posted 18 January 2019 - 05:22 PM

i think it's called motor control or hand to eye coordination.

 

Correct.

 

It should be noted, muscular control seems to be 50/50 determined by GENETICS. Different top athletes often share certain genes which gives their nerves and muscle fibers specific properties that make them better for certain tasks, than for the majority of people - hence, it's difficult to make any bigger improvements to this.

 

I must ask - do you have ANY actual difficulties with other types of coordination? If you suspect that you have issues with fine motor control then it could easily be DCD - Developmental Coordination Disorder - this is a common co-morbidity in Autism Spectrum Disorder, as you might be aware.

 

I suffer from a mild case of DCD myself actually, and have various issues with coordination, both fine and gross motor control. As far as I have found, DCD is poorly studied and understood, and wildly sub-diagnosed - many people go their entire lives without knowing they have it.

DCD is a genetic and neurologic Disorder, somewhat similar to something like Dyslexia.

 

 

If you are trying to improve your aim in an online game, something like... Counter-Strike, or Quake, then I would instead suggest for you to hone the other skills used in your game of choice, in order to improve in the game: map-control/knowledge, game-mechanics knowledge and general tactics.

 

 

Dopamine and Acetylcholine respectively, are two neuro-transmitters involved in motor control btw, so you could always look into the latest research on motor control and those neurotransmitters.



#9 farshad

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Posted 18 January 2019 - 05:35 PM

Correct.

 

It should be noted, muscular control seems to be 50/50 determined by GENETICS. Different top athletes often share certain genes which gives their nerves and muscle fibers specific properties that make them better for certain tasks, than for the majority of people - hence, it's difficult to make any bigger improvements to this.

 

I must ask - do you have ANY actual difficulties with other types of coordination? If you suspect that you have issues with fine motor control then it could easily be DCD - Developmental Coordination Disorder - this is a common co-morbidity in Autism Spectrum Disorder, as you might be aware.

 

I suffer from a mild case of DCD myself actually, and have various issues with coordination, both fine and gross motor control. As far as I have found, DCD is poorly studied and understood, and wildly sub-diagnosed - many people go their entire lives without knowing they have it.

DCD is a genetic and neurologic Disorder, somewhat similar to something like Dyslexia.

 

 

If you are trying to improve your aim in an online game, something like... Counter-Strike, or Quake, then I would instead suggest for you to hone the other skills used in your game of choice, in order to improve in the game: map-control/knowledge, game-mechanics knowledge and general tactics.

 

 

Dopamine and Acetylcholine respectively, are two neuro-transmitters involved in motor control btw, so you could always look into the latest research on motor control and those neurotransmitters.

 

 

I just think my bad motor control is caused by low neurontransmitters and too much vasodilation.

Nitric oxide 3 (NOS3). (NOS3, also known as eNOS, produces nitric oxide in our blood vessels, which helps vasodilation) , from what I understand anything that causes vasocontriction Improves motor control. but also increases blood pressure more blood to vessels better aim. I should note my hand to eye cordination is ok.

 

I also have infant head circumference, do you know what the cerebellum is? it is a brain part in the back of your head which controls movement,  I think due to my infant head circuference which means the back of my head is smaller I think it has somehow affected my cerebellum to develop, its just a theory tho.

 

 

the https://en.wikipedia...ki/Motor_cortex motor cortex has to most profound dopamine neurons.

 

 

I like how you're still fixated on autism, i dont have it i know how to be social or social etiquettes . I only have CRHR1 mutation which made it seem like I have autism and other disorders which is the cause of my stress-induced anxiety, people get misdiagonsed you know. And my other issue is low neurontransmitters..



#10 farshad

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Posted 01 February 2019 - 06:49 PM

nicotinic receptors https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/20414766

 

vitamin d (increase dopamine
5ht2a and 5ht2c antagonism (increase dopamine

5ht1a (increase dopamine release

other?

MB


Edited by farshad, 01 February 2019 - 06:50 PM.


#11 gamesguru

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Posted 01 February 2019 - 11:37 PM

magnesium, obviously.

https://www.ncbi.nlm...cles/PMC295901/

 

 

butcher's broom

https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/11152059

 

hawthorne

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC3891531/


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#12 farshad

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Posted 05 February 2019 - 05:43 PM

am i missing any important factors in motor control?

 

5-HT4 receptor -  modulates the release of various neurotransmitters. 
..others?

Edited by farshad, 05 February 2019 - 05:45 PM.


#13 farshad

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Posted 09 February 2019 - 04:46 PM

anything that decreases serotonin will increase dopamine



#14 farshad

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Posted 14 February 2019 - 01:59 PM

https://en.wikipedia...Dystonia#Causes etc


Edited by farshad, 14 February 2019 - 02:11 PM.


#15 Mind_Paralysis

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Posted 14 February 2019 - 08:08 PM

 

Dystonia? What makes you think you have that?

 

Just because you may have somewhat more shaky or unsteady hands than some of the population, doesn't mean you have dystonia.

 

So far, what you have described, does not sound like Dystonia - more like, as I said, a mild case of DCD.



#16 farshad

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Posted 14 February 2019 - 08:28 PM

Dystonia? What makes you think you have that?

 

Just because you may have somewhat more shaky or unsteady hands than some of the population, doesn't mean you have dystonia.

 

So far, what you have described, does not sound like Dystonia - more like, as I said, a mild case of DCD.

idk im just posting whatever here so there is a lot of information available regarding movements.



#17 farshad

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Posted 15 February 2019 - 02:34 PM

https://en.wikipedia...teral_sclerosis



#18 AceNZ

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Posted 19 February 2019 - 11:02 AM

How to Improve Smooth Muscle movements?

 

The type of muscle movements you're describing are controlled or influenced by:

  • Blood flow to the muscles
  • Joint and tendon stability
  • Nerve conduction
  • Nerve / spinal column / brain stem connectivity or compression
  • Neurotransmitters
  • Brain state, including factors such as sleep and stress
  • Various nutrients in the blood, such as blood sugar and magnesium vs. calcium balance
  • Heavy metals
  • Mitochondrial energy production
  • Drug side-effects
  • And many other factors

So, sure, excessive vasodilation *or* vasoconstriction could be part of it (although pretty unlikely, IMO) -- but so could a bunch of other things.

 

In very general terms, about all one can reliably say in terms of advice-over-the-Internet is to make sure your diet and supplement programs are as good as they can be. Beyond that, for something like this, you really need professional advice by someone who can physically examine you, get your history, run tests, and so on.


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#19 farshad

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Posted 21 February 2019 - 11:32 AM

thanks for that.

 

''Adenosine A1-Dopamine D1 Receptor Heteromers Control the Excitability of the Spinal Motoneuron.''

https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/29797183



#20 farshad

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Posted 22 February 2019 - 07:24 PM

how to improve basal ganglia function?



#21 farshad

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Posted 27 February 2019 - 09:36 PM

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Striatum

Nucleus accumbens 

 

main job is movement?

brain stems activate adrenaline and noradrenaline

https://en.wikipedia...ine_transporter

Adderall can upregulate them in the striatum and the nucleus accumbens (related to reward system)


Edited by farshad, 27 February 2019 - 09:41 PM.


#22 farshad

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Posted 09 March 2019 - 03:39 PM

Low dose aspirin increase dopamine and locomotor acitivity in mice



#23 farshad

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Posted 20 March 2019 - 10:49 PM

 Synephrine activates alpha receptors whereas ephedrine activates beta receptors.



#24 farshad

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Posted 21 March 2019 - 01:44 PM

phenethylamine (taken with an MAOI inhibitor better stronger effect) and propylhexedrine likely improve motor control because they are TAAR1 agonist the former which also binds to hTAAR2 and releases norepinephrine, dopamine and acetylcholine. And the usual dopamine drugs like Modafinil, Ritalin etc.

 

Dopamine receptor 1 together with Dopamine receptor 2 work together on movement. https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/19145338

 

 

''Acetylcholine controls movements by activating skeletal muscles and causes muscle contraction'' https://www.ncbi.nlm.../pubmed/1665266

dopamine receptor 1 and 2 https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/19145338

'The effects of serotonin (5-HT), histamine (H), and norepinephrine (NE) on bovine aortic endothelial cell (BAE) and vascular smooth muscle '' https://www.ncbi.nlm.../pubmed/2983565

''5-HT causes contraction of the vascular smooth muscle cells in most blood vessels ''

''Very high levels of uncontrolled nitric oxide through increased iNOS decreases smooth muscle contractions by the heart and lead to lower blood pressure ''

(does decreasing nitric oxide levels increase smooth movement?)

'' angiotensin II (AII) can effect vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation.''

''Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) is produced following exposure to allergens. Its main functions include: Smooth muscle contraction''

''Higenamine stimulates muscles by activating beta-adrenergic receptors, which are responsible for smooth muscle relaxation (β2) and heart contractions (β1). This means that muscles can exert more force. '' ''Adrenergic receptors are involved in: Smooth muscle relaxation (β2 receptors)''

https://www.reddit.c...soconstriction/

BDNF, ngf and gdnf etc


Edited by farshad, 21 March 2019 - 01:59 PM.


#25 farshad

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Posted 26 March 2019 - 04:02 PM

can someone explain to me why this drug is used for parkinsons? https://en.wikipedia...ki/Procyclidine which mechanism does it improve movement etc?


Edited by farshad, 26 March 2019 - 04:03 PM.


#26 farshad

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Posted 03 April 2019 - 04:15 PM

https://en.wikipedia...ns_and_symptoms ?



#27 farshad

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Posted 04 April 2019 - 02:02 PM

black seed oil improve movement no idea how it does this probably via nitric oxide inhibition

tianeptine too

mirtazapine also


Edited by farshad, 04 April 2019 - 02:03 PM.

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#28 farshad

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Posted 04 April 2019 - 05:47 PM

https://en.wikipedia...iki/Benserazide



#29 farshad

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Posted 04 April 2019 - 07:57 PM

since women have two x chromosomes are they less affected by neurotransmitters involved in movement etc? (men have XY). I read there is something called warrior gene which is decreased MAO-A activity leading to higher levels of serotonin etc but this condition if you wanna call it that is less affected in females because of the chromosomes differences.



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#30 farshad

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Posted 05 April 2019 - 07:11 PM

anything that increases blood flow / or blood pressure which causes vasoconstriction should improve movement. and anything that increases vasodilation (decreased blood pressure) opposite? or is it about an balance.

https://en.wikipedia...asoconstriction

memantine helps movement (via D2?)


Edited by farshad, 05 April 2019 - 07:12 PM.






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