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How to Improve Smooth Muscle movements?

vasoconstriction

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#31 farshad

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Posted 08 April 2019 - 02:02 AM

BDNF expressed in motor neurons

https://en.wikipedia...ki/Motor_neuron

(Selank/Semax)



#32 Keizo

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Posted 08 April 2019 - 12:30 PM

The most obvious thing to me is excessive tension, if you have that it can interfere.

 

One thing I always seem to notice while taking Cerebroylsin (main part of it is akin to CNTF I believe but also BDNF, etc), at least the first few days is that my general movement in daily tasks is smoother, easier and not requiring much thought/efforts. I'm guessing that's mostly due to it having some sort of mild relaxing effect, but it might also be far beyond that.

 

On the other hand something like oral tobacco seems to cause worsened coordination and a lot of tension for me. Also that happened when I supplemented CDP Choline.


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#33 farshad

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Posted 08 April 2019 - 01:20 PM

GDNF and NGF etc has involvement in movement?



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#34 farshad

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Posted 10 April 2019 - 06:20 PM

https://en.wikipedia..._neuron_disease



#35 WiseN666

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 01:38 PM

One thing that causes my hands to feel shakey is exercise. So resting helps with that. 



#36 farshad

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Posted 22 April 2019 - 07:59 AM

https://www.reddit.c...pamine_neurons/



#37 farshad

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Posted 24 April 2019 - 12:08 PM

Familial multiple system atrophy  etc



#38 farshad

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Posted 30 April 2019 - 08:40 AM

https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/26054881

ubiquinol (COQ10) (ATP)

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/29797183

adenosine A1-Dopamine D1 Receptor Heteromers Control the Excitability of the Spinal Motoneuron.

 

Cerebrolysin 

 

Cerebrolysin nanospheres slowed disease progression in a mouse model of Parkinson’s [R].

Additionally, cerebrolysin promoted the survival of brain cells and improved motor symptoms in rats with Parkinson’s disease [R].

It also reduced oxidative stress, restored brain dopamine levels, and improved behavior in rats with Parkinson’s disease [R].

 


Edited by farshad, 30 April 2019 - 09:34 AM.


#39 farshad

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Posted 30 April 2019 - 10:05 AM

Dopamine, nitric oxide, ATP, acetylcholine , adrenaline and noradrenaline

https://www.verywell...smitter-2795394

what else?



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#40 farshad

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Posted 30 April 2019 - 07:13 PM

Concurrent administration of Neu2000 and lithium produces marked improvement of motor neuron survival, motor function, and mortality.

 

Daily consumption of methylene blue reduces attentional deficits and dopamine reduction in a 6-OHDA model of Parkinson's disease. And it also inhibits Nitric Oxide which could have further implications in movement.

 

what neurotransmitters control the spinal cord?


Edited by farshad, 30 April 2019 - 07:15 PM.


#41 farshad

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 09:03 PM

 
 
 
 
 
 
skeletal muscles?
 
This is what I have come up with at the moment:
 
Nitric oxide:
I think nitric oxide is heavily involved in this and excess of it can make your movements inaccurate. I know there are three types of Nitric oxide enzymes with different functions, which one would be involved in movements? NOS1 ,NOS2 or NOS3?
 
''Nitric oxide (NO) contributes to vessel homeostasis by inhibiting vascular smooth muscle contraction''
 
Dopamine receptors. I know dopamine 1 and 2 rely on each other for smooth movement, not sure if other dopamine receptors are also involved. I guess these dopamine receptors act on the basal ganglia which is involved in movement.
 
I know high serotonin can make your aim bad.
''5-HT causes contraction of the vascular smooth muscle cells in most blood vessels ''
 
norepinephrine and adrenaline I think increases your smooth muscle movement
 
Acetylcholine I read has some function in this. ''Acetylcholine controls movements by activating skeletal muscles and causes muscle contraction''
 
histamine?calcium? BDNF?ACE inhibitors?NGF? etc
 
'' angiotensin II (AII) can effect vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation.''
 
''Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) is produced following exposure to allergens. Its main functions include: Smooth muscle contraction''
 
''Higenamine stimulates muscles by activating beta-adrenergic receptors, which are responsible for smooth muscle relaxation (β2) and heart contractions (β1). This means that muscles can exert more force. '' ''Adrenergic receptors are involved in: Smooth muscle relaxation (β2 receptors)''
 
That is vascular smooth muscles. Its not related to skeletal muscles movement.
 
Vasoconstriction and Vassodilation , it is all about an balance?

 

https://www.webmd.co...is-akathisia#2 

 

valproate perhaps helps movement


Edited by farshad, 01 May 2019 - 09:05 PM.


#42 farshad

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Posted 06 May 2019 - 01:25 PM

Probiotics may have beneficial effects in Parkinson’s disease: in vitro evidence

Parkinson's disease 'may' start in gut 

Enzyme linking Parkinson's & Alzheimer's: AEP. The enzyme is called asparagine endopeptidase or AEP. In healthy brains, AEP is found only in lysosomes, the structures in the cells that act as a waste removal system, digesting excess or worn out materials, viruses, or bacteria

https://www.medicaln...cles/320631.php

 



#43 farshad

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Posted 07 May 2019 - 04:45 AM

Progesterone reduces spasm and relaxes smooth muscleBronchi are widened and mucus regulated. (PRs are widely present in submucosal tissue.

 

Anti-inflammatory (curcumin longvida etc) drugs may prevent Parkinson disease (PD) by inhibiting a putative underlying neuroinflammatory process.

 

Collectively, these results indicate that during stress, CRH leads to the activation of skin mast cells through the CRH1 receptor which triggers vasodilation and increased vascular permeability.

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC5143486/

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/25987207

 

 


Edited by farshad, 07 May 2019 - 05:02 AM.


#44 farshad

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Posted 07 May 2019 - 04:37 PM

anything that improves bone health? https://takecareof.c...nts-bone-health

 

https://en.wikipedia...wiki/Cerebellum


Edited by farshad, 07 May 2019 - 04:53 PM.


#45 farshad

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Posted 08 May 2019 - 02:31 AM

Motor control
CB1 receptors are expressed throughout motor regions of the mammalian brain, suggesting that CB1 has a role in motor control. CB1 activation has been shown to effect specific kinematic variables in rodents, such as the rate of applied force during lever pressing,[33] and the amplitude (but not timing) of whisker movements.


#46 farshad

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Posted 09 May 2019 - 03:03 AM

 

Nine patients who had Parkinson’s disease were treated with tyrosine and probenecid. These patients showed an increase in homovanillic acid in the cerebrospinal fluid. The presence of homovanillic acid, a product of dopamine energy production, correlates to the fact that dopamine is being released in the brain [14].

Because Parkinson’s is strongly linked to the degeneration of neurons that release dopamine, increased levels of homovanillic acid could be good proof that tyrosine may be used to treat the disease [14].

 



#47 farshad

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Posted 09 May 2019 - 08:44 PM

I believe all these things that improve movement in any way shape of form can also increase strength, mobility, speed and such via the spinal cord mainly.



#48 farshad

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Posted 12 May 2019 - 03:55 AM

 

7,8-DHF improved motor function and prevents the loss of dopamine-related neurons in a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease [303132].

It also prevents the death of dopamine-sensitive neurons in monkey models of Parkinson’s disease [33].

 

Probably MAO-Inhibitors too 

 

https://en.wikipedia...hyl-β-carboline



#49 farshad

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Posted 12 May 2019 - 08:50 PM

Synthesis of anandamide seems to be related to dopamine. https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC4404240/

 

Increasing levels of the endocannabinoid 2-AG is neuroprotective in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine mouse model of Parkinson's disease. https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/26244281

 

Thyroid hormone level is associated with motor symptoms in de novo Parkinson's disease.

 
 
 
 
valproate via HDAC inhibition (increases BDNF, etc)

Edited by farshad, 12 May 2019 - 08:54 PM.


#50 farshad

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 06:26 AM

Coconut oil parkinsons success story

https://healthunlock...mproved-my-life



#51 farshad

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Posted 20 May 2019 - 01:53 PM

 

8) TUDCA May Help Treat Parkinson’s Disease

TUDCA protected nerve cells in a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease [28].
 
TUDCA prevented c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation. The JNK pathway leads to the death of neurons in Parkinson’s disease [29].

 



#52 farshad

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Posted 26 May 2019 - 08:40 PM

 

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is predominately a sporadic neurodegenerative disease affecting spinal motor neurons rapidly leading to paralysis and dysfunction in the respiratory system. R

CNTF may be dysregulated in ALS patients and rodents. R R R R

 

MANF (similarly to VEGF) can potently protect and restore dopamine neurons in the brain. R R R

For example, MANF can protect dopamine neurons and alleviate Parkinson's Disease (PD)-like symptoms in animal models exposed to the toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, a toxin that destroys dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra). R R

By regulating ERS, MANF improves motor function more efficiently than other neurotrophic factors. R

MANF's effects improving PD are even more effective when combined with CDNF or GDNFR R R R

 

CDNF (as well as GDNF and MANF) is commonly low in Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients. R R

Parkinson's Disease (PD) is characterized by a loss of dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) as well as an accumulation of α-synuclein (a biomarker of PD) in the central and enteric nervous system. R

CDNF is able to restore dopamine and the function of brain lesions of PD models in vivo. R R

This effect is even greater when combined with GDNF or MANFR R

CDNF can dissolve α-synuclein buildup in neurons. R R

It can decrease the damage of dopamine neurons from oxidopamine (6-OHDA). R R

It can decrease damage from MPTP (a neurotoxic precursor for dopamine neurons). R

CDNF also improves motor functions in animal models of PD. R R

 



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#53 farshad

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Posted 27 May 2019 - 12:00 AM

https://www.salubrai...for-parkinsons/

ginkgo-biloba



#54 farshad

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Posted 27 May 2019 - 09:45 PM

 

 

In a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease, treatment with Lion’s Mane reduced dopaminergic cell loss and attenuated motor deficits [15], suggesting that Lion’s Mane can slow down the progression of Parkinson’s Disease.

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC5351233/ tylenol

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC2592845/ Uridine & DHA (Omega 3)


Edited by farshad, 27 May 2019 - 10:34 PM.


#55 farshad

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Posted 20 June 2019 - 11:50 PM

I think the spinal cord has a big role in accurate and STRONG movements.

Here we show that a loss-of-function approach, blocking BDNF results in a significant reduction in dendritic spine density, associated with an increase in spine length and a decrease in head width. These changes are associated with a decrease in F-actin levels within spine heads.

 

Dopamine-containing neurons in the spinal cord: anatomy and some functional aspects.

 

 
2-Adrenoceptor Activation by Clonidine Enhances Stimulation-evoked Acetylcholine Release from Spinal Cord Tissue after Nerve Ligation in Rats
 
Many areas of the cerebral cortex process sensory information or coordinate motor output necessary for control of movement. Disturbances in cortical cholinergic system can affect locomotor coordination. Spinal cord injury causes severe motor impairment and disturbances in cholinergic signalling can aggravate the situation. Considering the impact of cortical cholinergic firing in locomotion, we focussed the study in understanding the cholinergic alterations in cerebral cortex during spinal cord injury. The gene expression of key enzymes in cholinergic pathway - acetylcholine esterase and choline acetyl transferase showed significant upregulation in the cerebral cortex of spinal cord injured group compared to control with the fold increase in expression of acetylcholine esterase prominently higher than cholineacetyl transferase. The decreased muscarinic receptor density and reduced immunostaining of muscarinic receptor subtypes along with down regulated gene expression of muscarinic M1 and M3 receptor subtypes accounts for dysfunction of metabotropic acetylcholine receptors in spinal cord injury group. Ionotropic acetylcholine receptor alterations were evident from the decreased gene expression of alpha 7 nicotinic receptors and reduced immunostaining of alpha 7 nicotinic receptors in confocal imaging. Our data pin points the disturbances in cortical cholinergic function due to spinal cord injury; which can augment the locomotor deficits. This can be taken into account while devising a proper therapeutic approach to manage spinal cord injury.
 
Traumatic injury of the spinal cord and nitric oxide.
 
 


#56 Keizo

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Posted 22 June 2019 - 11:31 AM

Someone probably already said this but "smooth muscle movements" is probably a very complicated thing in humans. So I would probably advice anyone who tries to "get better aim" in say counter strike or FPS games or maybe better performance in fighting games (moving their wrist or thumb better without accidental inputs) to not over-analyze various studies etc. you come across too much that deals with basic stuff in the body/brain.

 

I encourage experimenting and trying to figure things out, however I think first thing to be considered is the old-school ways of performance enhancing oneself. I don't know what pro gamers do, really, but various stimulants can probably have effectiveness overall at the right (low) dosage. Nicotine, caffeine, methylphenidate, etc.

However with those substance you can certainly run into the risk even with low dosages of causing too much muscle tension and thus getting worsened dexterity/fluidity/ease -of movement. And many situational factors matter. For example I have played a lot of Tekken 7 recently and one of the things that require a lot of dexterity (and muscle memory) is crouch canceled back dashes (korean backdashes). When I have been in stressful situations (playing against famous players or live on stream even without showing my face just 500+ people seeing my gameplay) and taking my regular dosage of methylphenidate (like 10mg IR, or 20 mg ER) that have caused me I'm sure to get worse performance overall in terms of dexterity, I think just due to overall stress being too high and so I got trouble with the KBD inputs cause my thumb got all stiff. IME some of the racetams can cause muscle tension too, just like regular stimulants.

 

Another thing some people use to get better performance in gaming is beta blockers (but those I'm pretty sure don't boost overall alertness, but might rather blunt reaction time (maybe, I don't know) they certainly can make one a bit more aloof and mildly fatigued/tired). 

 

 

Anyway I guess my only real advice with this ramble is to pay attention to how you feel when you play, and if you do try some substance at some point don't understimate that it can cause things to go too far in one direction or have paradoxical effects. (The most extreme example of paradoxical effects with drugs I can think of is damphetamine and methylphenidate, that stuff in low doses can cause a lot of relaxation and tiredness for some people and from time to time. First time I got 10mg/day d-amphetamine prescribed the first week I felt super tired and relaxed, then it switched over to more expected effects. I still get rather tired from my prescribed methylphenidate right after I take it in the morning, on some days.)

 

 

Also disclaimer: some of these substances I mentioned are addictive, especially nicotine is super addictive. And may cause health problems. The biggest danger with low dose d-amphetamine or methylphenidate is shared with caffeine, may cause heart/blood pressure problems in certain individuals, including sudden unexpected death. Tbh I think anyone who drinks lots of caffeine (esp periodically like some kid gamers) should probably check to see if they dont have a heart problem beforehand, just go to a doctor and say you have "high heart rate often (or fatigue), I wonder if it might be something wrong with my heart" and maybe you can get an ultra sound and  an electrocardiogram to check for any obvious defects. At the very least take a blood pressure if you use caffeine (or beforementioned stimulants) a lot. 



#57 farshad

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Posted 24 June 2019 - 08:35 PM

Mild iodine deficiency causes abnormalities in movement

 

 



#58 farshad

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Posted 09 July 2019 - 02:29 PM

Valproic acid increases reelin mRNA levels. Reelin stimulates dendrite and dendritic spine development and regulates neuronal migration.



#59 farshad

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Posted 09 July 2019 - 03:37 PM

I mostly made this thread because I wanted to improve my aim in games.....



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#60 farshad

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Posted 09 July 2019 - 08:09 PM

Valproic acid enhances  recovery of motor function 







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