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I'm 30. What do I do?

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#1 experimenting

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Posted 29 October 2018 - 12:54 AM


Just hitting the magic number soon. Think it's time to develop a stack.

Those who have seen my posts know I have had various issues in the past-a d/k2 stack plus iron protein succylinate has done quite well for me but as I get older I think it's time to take a more aggressive approach.

Where do I start? Obviously there's the NAD+ thing which if someone could help demystify for a beginner like me it would be much appreciated.
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#2 baccheion

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Posted 29 October 2018 - 12:10 PM

Look into iodine protocol (+ vitamin D3 + K2 MK-4) and MSM lotion.

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#3 Fafner55

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Posted 29 October 2018 - 03:54 PM

For healthy adults younger than 35 or so, little if anything can be done to improve on what evolution has provided. One should simply try to stay healthy by
  1. Maintaining a healthy weight
  2. Eating a diet low in refined carbs and sugar
  3. Exercising moderately.
However, after reproductive age, 35 or so, evolution is more or less done with us and our bodies begin to decline.  After that point interventions could improve one’s health.
 
I suggest reading Valter Longo's book for a perspective on maintaining insulin sensitivity and stimulating stem cell proliferation, "The Longevity Diet: Discover the New Science Behind Stem Cell Activation and Regeneration to Slow Aging, Fight Disease, and Optimize Weight"
 

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#4 Mind

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Posted 29 October 2018 - 05:19 PM

What Fafner55 said....also get adequate sleep. You are still very close to the prime of your biological life. Nothing that is available now will change much. Megadosing on things your body does not need might cause significant problems.


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#5 experimenting

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Posted 04 November 2018 - 03:19 AM

Damn, nothing at all supplementation wise?

#6 baccheion

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Posted 04 November 2018 - 05:56 AM

Damn, nothing at all supplementation wise?

Fix any nutrient deficiencies, put hormones/etc in the preferred range, improve diet and nutrition, add regular movement and maybe exercise, ensure quality sleep, lower stress, go on an extended water fast, gain muscle (average weight given height and frame size, but at 12% body fat), heal and rejuvenate, apply Lugol's iodine to warts/moles/etc, clear waste and toxins, meditate and/or listen to brainwave entrainment audio, look into genetic testing, etc.

That is, set yourself up to enter maintenance mode, deeply heal while the body is still able, and as I mentioned in an earlier post, iodine protocol (could include scrotum painting) and MSM lotion. NutrEval, a comprehensive hormone panel, and a thyroid panel every 1-2 years make it easier to keep everything in the preferred/optimal range.

Iodine (protocol), topical pregnenolone + DHEA (5 mg : 5 mg; up to 3x/day), 5-9 mg vitamin K2 MK-4, 50-100 IU/kg vitamin D3 (40-60 ng/mL 25(OH)D), chelated/TRAACS magnesium, multivitamin, selegiline (+ memantine), nicotinamide riboside + pterostilbene, MSM flakes + silicon/monomethylsilanetriol + vitamin C (4g:1g MSM:C)..

Edited by baccheion, 04 November 2018 - 06:20 AM.


#7 Mind

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Posted 04 November 2018 - 12:04 PM

There are many supplements that have a tiny effect on the pace of aging, but none of them compare to the power of managing your calories and getting exercise. Use your money to support rejuvenation research instead of purchasing supplements. At 30 years of age, it is a much better investment.


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#8 pamojja

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Posted 04 November 2018 - 01:50 PM

Damn, nothing at all supplementation wise?

 

NutrEval, a comprehensive hormone panel, and a thyroid panel every 1-2 years make it easier to keep everything in the preferred/optimal range.

 

Agree with baccheion. Get as much blood testing as possible from your GP first, to see if there are some weak spots in your metabolism. Only after and with inconsistencies something as expensive as a NutriEval test.

 

Complete blood count, liver and kidney enzymes, glucose metabolism, triglycerides, thyroid and other hormones, electrolytes and other available minerals (Cu, Zn), iron panel, coagulation, blood pressure, vitamins (B9, B12, D3), inflammation markers (hs-CRP, homocysteine, fibrinogen), etc. Also a hair tissue mineral analysis could give inexpensive insights.

 

With the overly sensitive reaction to supplements you reported in other threads (iodine, vitamin K) could mean there is something really off. And with extensive testing you could start targeted supplementation, impossible by mere guessing or copying other regimens.
 


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#9 dosquito

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Posted 04 November 2018 - 03:06 PM

Can someone elaborate on nutreval vs spectracell? and what to say to your doctor?

Also, I think you guys are a little overboard on the lack of supps recommendation. People are visibly aged by their mid 20s including facial lines/wrinkles. It's good to have a solid base of fish oil, multi, k2, magnesium, lactoferrin, and potentially iodine protocol

#10 experimenting

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Posted 04 November 2018 - 04:03 PM

Yeah, what tests should I start with, exactly? And not trying to be selfish but hoping this thread can become the go-to for novices such as myself.

I've got an optimized vitamin D status (80 iirc) and I'm taking a LEF k2 once a week. Pamojja I am sensitive to supps in general but it is worth noting that the LEF K mix is 38 times the RDA so is it really that surprising? Though the iodine thing was extremely strange to say the least. Magnesium I low-dose also to the tune of 200mg a few times a week.

Dosquito -fish oil-i used to use it but didn't really notice anything plus I got confused by all the rancidity worries. What's your product, dose, and effects?

#11 dosquito

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Posted 04 November 2018 - 05:30 PM

check out my regimine thread. i'm 26


there are many good fish oil brands these days. actually there's one at CVS thats like 90% omega 3s. just find ones with super high concentration

Edited by dosquito, 04 November 2018 - 05:31 PM.


#12 Rocket

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Posted 05 November 2018 - 12:59 AM

Want to know what to do at 30? Don't throw money away on useless supplements. Enjoy life. Exercise and eat healthy. Have lots of sex. Have I missed anything? Nope.

#13 pamojja

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Posted 05 November 2018 - 01:06 PM

Get as much blood testing as possible from your GP first, to see if there are some weak spots in your metabolism.

 

Complete blood count, liver and kidney enzymes, glucose metabolism, triglycerides, thyroid and other hormones, electrolytes and other available minerals (Cu, Zn), iron panel, coagulation, blood pressure, vitamins (B9, B12, D3), inflammation markers (hs-CRP, homocysteine, fibrinogen), etc. Also a hair tissue mineral analysis could give inexpensive insights.

 

Yeah, what tests should I start with, exactly?

 

Pamojja I am sensitive to supps in general but it is worth noting that the LEF K mix is 38 times the RDA so is it really that surprising?

 

As I said, get as many from my list as possible from a GP for free. The more the better. Though these are really just rudimentary test, GPs generally don't like do so many in a young healthy person and will cut it down greatly anyway. Maybe pretend some conditions to get more of them done at once?

 

An iron panel includes serum iron, ferritin, transferrin and transferrin saturation and total iron binding capacity.

A liver panel includes AST, ALT, GGT, APH, LDH, and maybe also a CPK.

A kidney panel includes creatinine, blood uria nitrogen (BUN), uric acid, GFR and a BUN/creatinine ratio.

Thyroid hormones free T3 and free T4, while most doc's only test TSH for initial screening. Also TPO and TG antibodies.

Hormones includes cortisol, DHEAs, testosterone, estrogen and SHBG.

Glucose metabolism a fasting glucose, HbA1c and an fasting insulin, if you can get.

Electrolytes include sodium, calcium, potassium, chloride and phosphor. May try to also get a Magnesium while at it.

A cholesterol panel would include total cholesterol, LDL, HDL and triglycerides. Though triglycerides alone would already tell enough for a start. Others are already specified in the quoted post.

 

Next be prepared to ask your GP for a photocopy of all test-results. Because conventional medicine uses very wide ranges of 'normal ranges', where functional medicine could predict and prevent already by small deviations from 'optimal ranges' a lot of later chronic conditions.

 

 

Vitamin K has been tested in doses of 45 mgs (LEFs contain only 2.6 mg) in Japan, and a few hundred milligrams as antidote to anticoagulation agent poisoning, without any bad side-effects.


Edited by pamojja, 05 November 2018 - 01:10 PM.


#14 pamojja

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Posted 05 November 2018 - 01:29 PM

Want to know what to do at 30? Don't throw money away on useless supplements. Enjoy life. Exercise and eat healthy. Have lots of sex. Have I missed anything? Nope.

 

At least don't be blessedly ignorant about your lab markers as I've been. In retrospect I did find a single triglyceride test of 254 mg/dl done at the health exam for the army (at age 21). To my great harm I believed the doc of that time, that that is only a little above normal and nothing one can do, or should worry about.

 

20 years later I came down with a 80% blockage at my abdominal aorta with a 60% walking disability. Which I now know could have so easily prevented. Exercise, eating healthy and sex didn't. Conventional medicine considered it non-reversible. Only copious and expensive amounts of supplements reversed the disability after 6 further years.

 

I could have prevented that episode a lot cheaper with less ignorance, and also less supplements earlier.
 



#15 Rocket

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Posted 05 November 2018 - 11:40 PM

The OP's only stated medical condition is being 30. What is he to do? Clear nonexistent senescent cells with cancer medication and deal with those side effects? Rejuvenate mitochondria that don't need to be rejuvenated? Other than eating healthy and exercising with weights and by doing cardio, the best thing the OP can do is enjoy his youth and not waste thousands on useless supplements. 


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#16 experimenting

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Posted 06 November 2018 - 12:52 AM

The OP's only stated medical condition is being 30. What is he to do? Clear nonexistent senescent cells with cancer medication and deal with those side effects? Rejuvenate mitochondria that don't need to be rejuvenated? Other than eating healthy and exercising with weights and by doing cardio, the best thing the OP can do is enjoy his youth and not waste thousands on useless supplements.


Well I did have a severe vitamin d deficiency for a long time. But that's been rectified (with some issues along the way) so yes I'd consider myself healthy. I do eat well, exercise and maintain a healthy body weight and composition (6'2", 185 lbs, 15%bf).

I really am just looking for an extra edge. If it doesn't exist then so be it.

#17 pamojja

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Posted 06 November 2018 - 01:49 PM

The OP's only stated medical condition is being 30. What is he to do? Clear nonexistent senescent cells with cancer medication and deal with those side effects? Rejuvenate mitochondria that don't need to be rejuvenated? Other than eating healthy and exercising with weights and by doing cardio, the best thing the OP can do is enjoy his youth and not waste thousands on useless supplements. 

 

At 30 I would had said that too. Though the perfect storm arising a decade later already brewing.

 

What to do in such an ignorant situation is to get extensive blood testing, get educated about it's meaning, to see if something is coming. And then use targeted supplementation when necessary only.


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#18 brosci

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Posted 07 November 2018 - 10:53 PM

I have read that with genes like the apoE4, brain hypometabolism begins as early as 20-30 setting the stage for eventual cognitive decline: https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC1739360/

 

While 30s are generally asymptomatic, I'm not confident that there's nothing better to do than eat normal foods, move around, and go to sleep, when the goal is optimizing human potential.  That said, I've got nothing to add / suggest beyond testing what you can, and seeing where you can find small repeatable / safe upgrades.  I'm a fan of supplemental magnesium, which seems relatively safe and beneficial most of the time.

 

I wish it were easier to quantify what seemed to offer real benefits -- like, am I better off taking resveratrol, or curcumin, or EGCG, quercetin, fisetin, garlic extract, grape seed extract, pomegranate extract, something like metformin, NMN / NR, etc... or nothing?  Just with those random 11 compounds, there's 2,048 different combinations that can be taken... if I just tried each combo for 1week, it would take me close to 40 years to investigate them all... and that's not looking at different dosages or different timings or different forms (eg. micronized resveratrol vs a phytosome.)  I tend to haphazardly freestyle it by the latest articles popping into LEF / Pubmed.  I take subjective notes on what seems to offer some benefit, but the signal to noise ratio is nearly unusably low.


Edited by brosci, 07 November 2018 - 11:18 PM.

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#19 baccheion

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Posted 08 November 2018 - 12:26 AM

I have read that with genes like the apoE4, brain hypometabolism begins as early as 20-30 setting the stage for eventual cognitive decline: https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC1739360/

While 30s are generally asymptomatic, I'm not confident that there's nothing better to do than eat normal foods, move around, and go to sleep, when the goal is optimizing human potential. That said, I've got nothing to add / suggest beyond testing what you can, and seeing where you can find small repeatable / safe upgrades. I'm a fan of supplemental magnesium, which seems relatively safe and beneficial most of the time.

I wish it were easier to quantify what seemed to offer real benefits -- like, am I better off taking resveratrol, or curcumin, or EGCG, quercetin, fisetin, garlic extract, grape seed extract, pomegranate extract, something like metformin, NMN / NR, etc... or nothing? Just with those random 11 compounds, there's 2,048 different combinations that can be taken... if I just tried each combo for 1week, it would take me close to 40 years to investigate them all... and that's not looking at different dosages or different timings or different forms (eg. micronized resveratrol vs a phytosome.) I tend to haphazardly freestyle it by the latest articles popping into LEF / Pubmed. I take subjective notes on what seems to offer some benefit, but the signal to noise ratio is nearly unusably low.

Hence the beauty of good labs like NutrEval, a comprehensive hormone panel, a thyroid panel, maybe microbiome testing, etc. And genetic testing.
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#20 dosquito

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Posted 08 November 2018 - 01:01 AM

I'm starting to wonder if lots of us end up here because of digestive / autoimmune disorders. I came up for both celiac-associated genes on 23andme. My dad has crohns. Now I'm rethinking everything. If that's actually the case for me, then supplementation is going to be drowned out by your real issues. I think gluten/allergy and thyroid issues are probably at the top of the health hierarchy. You can't target nutrient deficiencies effectively if you aren't absorbing them. Plus you could be going in the wrong direction. For example: iron. Celiacs end up anemic, but if you have no idea to look out for that you are going to follow the standard advice here and avoid iron. I'm trying to try out gluten free but apparently you have to be super anal about it for weeks to even tell if it helps

Edited by dosquito, 08 November 2018 - 01:04 AM.

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#21 brosci

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Posted 08 November 2018 - 01:37 AM

Hence the beauty of good labs like NutrEval, a comprehensive hormone panel, a thyroid panel, maybe microbiome testing, etc. And genetic testing.

 

I get it, but as someone who has ran the hormone panel, the thyroid panel, the microbiome testing, and the genetic testing... it's only raised more questions than it has answered.


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#22 dosquito

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Posted 08 November 2018 - 01:42 AM

I get it, but as someone who has ran the hormone panel, the thyroid panel, the microbiome testing, and the genetic testing... it's only raised more questions than it has answered.


Can you elaborate? Haven't you at least been able to rule things out?
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#23 brosci

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Posted 08 November 2018 - 02:19 AM

Can you elaborate? Haven't you at least been able to rule things out?

I don't want to hijack the thread but it's like, looking at genetics -- I have the C677T polymorphism, so do I use moderately high dose methyl-folate + methyl-b12, despite supplemental folate + b12 being associated with increased cancer risk?  Looking at labwork, my liver enzymes were once under 20, now over 20 -- is this a threshold where you try to do something about it?  On my hormone panel, my DHEA and progesterone are moderately low -- so do I take DHEA even though it may raise prostate cancer risk or ultimately convert to estrogen?  Without taking supplemental D3, my levels were around 45 ng/mL from sun exposure during the winter -- is this a range where I would want to add more on top (I'm probably much higher in the summer) ?  Looking at my gut profile, I was low in microbial diversity and bifido, despite eating lots of bifido-friendly prebiotics and bifido probiotics at the time... what does that mean?   My LDL-P is moderately high but sdLDL isn't too high -- I can lower this with a higher-carb diet -- but do I actively intervene to lower cholesterol if I have an apoE4? Is higher circulating insulin more atherogenic / harmful than higher lipoprotein circulation after taking the particle size into account (which would decrease if I traded fats for carbs) ? My IGF1 is low -- is this protective or a risk factor?  My omega-3 tested low in my blood, but when I supplement more than a modest amount, I notice a good amount of blood thinning -- is that a stroke risk?  The genetic testing showed that I may have an inflammatory response to vitamin E supplementation -- does that include gamma tocopherol or various tocotrienols?  One test showed I may have an immune reaction to whey protein -- but isn't that the point with all the IgG's and immune-boosting factors (it doesn't give me any noticable issues) ?  Etc.

 

All the data has surely given me much to think about (I probably wouldn't have thought about any of them without the tests), but I haven't really run into any major issues where it came to save the day or offer concise guidance.  Like, would I benefit from a microdose of lithium knowing all of the previously mentioned info?  Or, would I benefit from something like Zinc Carnosine or ashwagandha?  As far as I can tell, the labwork has mostly told me to stick to a very high fat, low carb diet with a lot of vegetables and anti-inflammatory / neuroprotective / cardioprotective nutrients + phytochemicals.  But, I'm sure there would be doctors that would completely disagree.


Edited by brosci, 08 November 2018 - 02:29 AM.

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#24 experimenting

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Posted 08 November 2018 - 02:28 AM

Well I did 23andme SNPs. Takeaway was I need more vitamin D than most (and I agree with this, i feel great in the 70+ range). And additionally I apparently need folate but I tried methyl vitamins and they really flatlines me, hated it. Other than that can I gather anything else from 23andme?
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#25 Rocket

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Posted 08 November 2018 - 02:03 PM

This is not a supplements discussion. Its more like general health. This thread should be closed or moved.


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#26 sthira

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Posted 08 November 2018 - 06:52 PM

Want to know what to do at 30? Don't throw money away on useless supplements. Enjoy life. Exercise and eat healthy. Have lots of sex. Have I missed anything? Nope.


Don't get her pregnant. That's a paragraph unto itself.

Do save your money, though. Save save save because nothing exists now to reverse aging damages; so waste not time, money and hope believing something will. Maybe tomorrow something will exist, or next week, next month, next year, decade, quarter century, no one knows, I still believe in fasting, though, and calorie restriction, tilting at windmills, eat a consistent, whole food plant based diet, yeah yeah yeah, it'll keep you healthy, blah blah it won't stop aging.

Document what you eat daily on cronometer, it'll give you broad vague hints about daily nutrient shortfalls.

Care about teeth.

Value joints. Keep yourself strong, flexible, and lean. Be funny. Trip on shrooms every now and then, twist up your brains, eventually we all must die anyway, and we will soon be dead -- forever -- unless in this great stupid universe everything recombines again and again (Nietzsche) to make "you" -- you again.

Then again, individual identity is probably an illusion, so just eat more leafy greens and legumes, maybe ride your bike up and down the Nile River while waiting for the anti-aging miracles that may or may not come in our lifetimes.
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