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HPN's new alternative NAD booster (NAD3)

nad3 nad booster

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#31 Canetti

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Posted 30 January 2019 - 03:50 PM

Long time member, but very infrequent poster here. I recently ran into this issue myself. Recently ordered some HPN NR from a reputable site that carries multiple brands. Was sent the NAD3 product instead. I don't believe the site I ordered from was even aware of the substitution, and they are refunding the purchase price. As a previous post alluded to, HPN very recently (fall of 2018) sold their Niagen line to ChromaDex, and, as surmised, it appears HPN has gone over to the dark side in response, and is trying to replace their income stream both by "sliding" NAD3 in to the slot previously occupied by Niagen to take advantage of the unaware, and is also resorting to hucksterism typical of the worst practices of the supplement field when profiting off selling the masses "magic powders". Whenever I see any description alluding to "a proprietary blend" it's time to run. The notion that "the ingredients aren't unique, but somehow our exact ratio of combining them makes the magic happens" is simply risible.

 

There is one study on pubmed that cuprous niacin may ameliorate fatty liver disease, but that's all I could find. [ed: before I even finished this post, I discovered more reported studies on pubmed under "copper (1)-nicotinate. Still no reports of the "miracle NAD boosting" variety though.]

 

However, I did not make this post just to weigh in with a "me too". Rather, I wanted to draw attention to what the following site says: https://bdlbiochem.com/fda-work/. The author of that site claims to have been involved in getting cuprous niacin approved by the FDA. The key take away is that approval was a formality, as he was able to demonstrate that cuprious niacin disassociates in the acidic environment of the stomach into copper and niacin, both of which are of course already approved supplements. So this seems to be one of the instances where you really can just take the two component molecules, and derive the same benefit. All the more reason not to pay NR prices for a pinch of cuprous niacin, some tasty wasabi, and some wanna-be caffeine.


Edited by Canetti, 30 January 2019 - 03:51 PM.

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#32 aribadabar

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Posted 09 February 2019 - 12:12 AM

 As a previous post alluded to, HPN very recently (fall of 2018) sold their Niagen line to ChromaDex, and, as surmised, it appears HPN has gone over to the dark side in response, and is trying to replace their income stream both by "sliding" NAD3 in to the slot previously occupied by Niagen to take advantage of the unaware, and is also resorting to hucksterism typical of the worst practices of the supplement field when profiting off selling the masses "magic powders". Whenever I see any description alluding to "a proprietary blend" it's time to run. The notion that "the ingredients aren't unique, but somehow our exact ratio of combining them makes the magic happens" is simply risible.

 

No, that's not what happened - Chromadex just cut off most of their wholesale Niagen distributors (one of which was HPN) to curtail the price erosion due to competition among them and to boost their margins and start a direct-to-consumer model under their own brand - TruNiagen. The rest I agree with you.


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#33 Canetti

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Posted 09 February 2019 - 03:53 AM

No, that's not what happened - Chromadex just cut off most of their wholesale Niagen distributors (one of which was HPN) to curtail the price erosion due to competition among them and to boost their margins and start a direct-to-consumer model under their own brand - TruNiagen. The rest I agree with you.


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#34 Phoebus

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Posted 09 February 2019 - 10:10 PM

  as he was able to demonstrate that cuprious niacin disassociates in the acidic environment of the stomach into copper and niacin, both of which are of course already approved supplements. 

 

ah! so that expensive cuprious niacin is the same as buying cheap copper and cheap niacin. And they know it, but still charge crazy amounts of money for it. Nice. 





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