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David Sinclair explaining his tweet on sublingual delivery for NMN

nmn

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#1 Andey

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Posted 09 September 2019 - 11:56 AM


How do I take NMN? Sublingual, nope

No need to read between the lines
Two words.

That’s all it took to throw a bunch of people into a tizzy, and to ensure that my inbox, which is over-full on any day, was over-fuller than that.

What were those two words? “Sublingual? Nope.”

What the heck does that mean? Well, let me explain.

Sublingual is a pharmacological route of administration in which molecules are diffused into the bloodstream through the soft tissue under the tongue.

Some people think it’s a good way to get NMN into your bloodstream. It’s a good way to get a lot of things into your bloodstream, so they might be right.

Or they might be wrong.

Because when it comes to NAD precursors, there’s far more we don’t know than what we do. And, as I’ve said many, many times, the best evidence will come when placebo-controlled human trials (lots of them) have been completed. Until then, anyone who is taking NMN—in any way—is guessing. And, even if they have the best of intentions, anyone who is selling you NMN as a product, and telling you how to take it, is also guessing.

I’ve worked very hard to be very transparent. I’ve told the world, for instance, that I have been taking NMN for some time now. So have many members of my family and plenty of my friends and colleagues. And I’m asked—a lot—about how I take it.

So recently I answered: “Sublingual? Nope.”

Oh man. A few people were not happy with me.

But here’s the thing: If you’ve been paying attention at all, you know that I don’t give medical advice and I don’t endorse products.

In the interest of transparency, though, I have been willing to explain what I do, but always with the caveat that (once again for the people in the back) I don’t give medical advice and I don’t endorse products.

This has always been my policy.

So I’m not saying: “Should YOU take sublingual NMN? Nope.”

And I’m not saying: “Is sublingual NMN any good? Nope.”

I’m saying: “Do I take sublingual? Nope.”

There is literally no other way to read those two words, unless you think that I suddenly changed my mind about giving medical advice and endorsing products.

What you’ll get from me is science, along with some disclosures about how I’m trying to apply it to my life. And that’s it.

I do believe that we’re on the cusp of fundamentally shifting the way humans think about aging. NMN might play a big role in that shift. Or it might be a blip on the radar as we move onward and upward. Time will tell.

But if you think that listening to me has any value whatsoever as our world moves in this bold new direction, know this: I’m going to do my very best to help you understand the science, and I’m going to be as transparent as possible about my own life, but I’m NOT going to tell you how to live yours.

 

 

This is from his newsletter (you can subscribe to it at https://lifespanbook.com) 

Direct link is https://lifespanbook...82c02d-75548373


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#2 bluemoon

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Posted 10 September 2019 - 10:09 PM

He is quite the wordy biologist! 



#3 Andey

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Posted 11 September 2019 - 03:54 AM

He is quite the wordy biologist! 

 

 

He actually backed up a bit in a recent podcast with Peter Attia. I dont recall exact wording but it was something about gut bacteria eating a lot of NMN that was taken orally and that sublingual could be of value to get NMN quicker to the blood.

https://peterattiamd...davidsinclair2/

But it was a word fencing exercise too))  (Its around 1 hour 53 minutes from the start )

 


Edited by Andey, 11 September 2019 - 03:59 AM.

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#4 Forever21

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Posted 11 September 2019 - 07:36 PM

So should I take sublingual NMN then or not? Is he endorsing or not NOT endorsing?

 

How does he take his NMN? Does he take NAD+?


Edited by Forever21, 11 September 2019 - 07:37 PM.


#5 Chrys

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Posted 11 September 2019 - 08:45 PM

I also listened to Dr Attia's podcast with David Sinclair. He still takes 1000mg of NMN orally. What I found interesting were his comments on activators (like Reservatrol, metformin, etc). He said that if you fast (all the different varieties) and exercised (like High Intensity Interval Training) there really was no need to take the activators because diet and activity were the activators. He suggested taking activators when you take a day or two off from diet and exercise. He said that when he's traveling he pretty much relies on Reservatrol and Metformin.

 

As an aside I started about 6 months cutting back on NMN dosing to see if there was any impact on my health/stamina. I went from about 1000mg/day (like Sinclair) to taking NMN sublingually. Based on a member's comments who said your body could only absorb about 30mg per 60-90 minutes when taken SL. I have been taking about 6 to 8 dosing per day (30mg * 8= 240 mg per day). I also take ABN's NAD+ spray. I thing it is 15mg per spurt. So I getting 30mg x 4 time = 120 mg / day. So, 240 + 120 = 360 mg per day. I feel just as great as when I was consuming 1000 mg per day. This is a relief to my wallet. My only regret is having that jar of NMN staring at me all the time while I work at my computer. A time released pill would be much better.

 

Here's the podcast's index:

 

We discuss:
  • SIR genes and cellular identity [8:45];
  • Sirtuins regulate gene expression [14:30];
  • DNA is methylated at the deepest layer of the epigenome [17:45];
  • Methylation pattern and determining cellular age [20:15];
  • Cellular reprogramming [33:45];
  • Yamanaka factors to push cells “back in time”  [41:00];
  • Human cellular reprogramming viability [57:00];
  • Measuring the rate of aging [1:02:45];
  • Cellular reprogramming for longevity [1:14:45];
  • Compounds David takes for his own longevity [1:29:15]
  • NAD precursors (NR, NMN) and pterostilbene [1:40:00];
  • The current field of sirtuin activators [2:03:15];
  • David’s artistic work [2:05:15] and;
  • More.


#6 to age or not to age

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Posted 11 September 2019 - 08:49 PM


From Robert Kane Pappas, the above link is to excerpts from my July interview with David, culled from my new film "To Age or Not To Age -Transforming the Human Condition"

David is the genuine article


Edited by to age or not to age, 11 September 2019 - 08:49 PM.


#7 farshad

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Posted 11 September 2019 - 08:59 PM

I am/was just listening to him on Joe Rogan's podcast. funny I see this.



#8 Oakman

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Posted 12 September 2019 - 01:21 AM

So should I take sublingual NMN then or not? Is he endorsing or not NOT endorsing?

 

How does he take his NMN? Does he take NAD+?

 

The answer is simple. Do what you think best. That's what he does for whatever reasons he has in his mind. And as he says, he's not saying any other way is wrong or right. He doesn't give medical (or any other) advice.

 

From a practical point of view, as has been noted, sublingual is much easier on the wallet and (and I agree) seems to provide the same benefits (whether placebo or not).



#9 bluemoon

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Posted 12 September 2019 - 09:37 AM

  He said that if you fast (all the different varieties) and exercised (like High Intensity Interval Training) there really was no need to take the activators because diet and activity were the activators. He suggested taking activators when you take a day or two off from diet and exercise. He said that when he's traveling he pretty much relies on Reservatrol and Metformin. 

 

 

Sinclair didn't say this. He said that he takes resveratrol every morning and adds metformin when traveling, beyond the metformin that he normally takes.


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#10 Heisok

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 10:54 PM

He is making the interview rounds. He clarified to Asprey about Metformin. He started taking it due to his blood glucose tests results increasing. Not just a one off test. He has a family history of B.G./Diabetes issues. Based on the possible problem with exercise, he does not take it on days he exercises. He does take it when traveling.

 

Attia's position:  "For me, in response to these papers, along with my personal experience of seeing slightly higher lactate levels during zone 2 training(suggesting, perhaps, less mitochondrial efficiency), I’ve reduced my dose of metformin and only take it in the evening in an effort to reduce the amount of metformin in my system when I’m awake and exercising."

 

https://peterattiamd...n-and-exercise/

 

"I'm a scientist and I'm trying to figure this stuff out before time runs out for all of us. What I'm doing with myself is I'm
taking Metformin on days that I don't exercise and often, I'm not exercising because I'm on the road. I'm on planes and that's my substitute for exercise. If Ido exercise hard, I will skip the Metformin because it may blunt the effects.

 

https://blog.daveasp...d-sinclair-626/

 

Edit more: "Going back to the Metformin story,what's important to know is you asked me, Dave. What's really important is why did I decide to take Metformin? Now if my blood sugar was low like yours and it was steady low, there's no point in taking a medicine if you're already achieving the goal. Mine was edging up month by month, year by year and it was a straight line up. I was headed for diabetes like my father had, my grandmother had at an early age. For me, it made a lot of sense to try the Metformin, to try and bring that back down, which worked for me."


Edited by Heisok, 16 September 2019 - 11:29 PM.


#11 Andey

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 06:13 AM

He is making the interview rounds. He clarified to Asprey about Metformin. He started taking it due to his blood glucose tests results increasing. Not just a one off test. He has a family history of B.G./Diabetes issues. Based on the possible problem with exercise, he does not take it on days he exercises. He does take it when traveling.

 

Attia's position:  "For me, in response to these papers, along with my personal experience of seeing slightly higher lactate levels during zone 2 training(suggesting, perhaps, less mitochondrial efficiency), I’ve reduced my dose of metformin and only take it in the evening in an effort to reduce the amount of metformin in my system when I’m awake and exercising."

 

https://peterattiamd...n-and-exercise/

 

"I'm a scientist and I'm trying to figure this stuff out before time runs out for all of us. What I'm doing with myself is I'm
taking Metformin on days that I don't exercise and often, I'm not exercising because I'm on the road. I'm on planes and that's my substitute for exercise. If Ido exercise hard, I will skip the Metformin because it may blunt the effects.

 

https://blog.daveasp...d-sinclair-626/

 

Edit more: "Going back to the Metformin story,what's important to know is you asked me, Dave. What's really important is why did I decide to take Metformin? Now if my blood sugar was low like yours and it was steady low, there's no point in taking a medicine if you're already achieving the goal. Mine was edging up month by month, year by year and it was a straight line up. I was headed for diabetes like my father had, my grandmother had at an early age. For me, it made a lot of sense to try the Metformin, to try and bring that back down, which worked for me."

 

 

  I would say we should not treat his words for more than it is. He listens to what other people have to say and to a recent research just as we do.

Chris Masterjohn made a case for taking TMG with NAD precursors and David started to take it. There was a recent study with metformin counteracting effect of exercise and David started to space it accordingly.

With the recent interview with Peter Attia he was also quite open that the bulk of orally taken NMN and NR not get digested as a whole, but made a case why he expect for it to work anyway.

Kudos to him for not entrenching into his views, this probably makes a good scientist. 


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#12 bluemoon

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 07:00 PM

 

With the recent interview with Peter Attia he was also quite open that the bulk of orally taken NMN and NR not get digested as a whole, but made a case why he expect for it to work anyway.

Kudos to him for not entrenching into his views, this probably makes a good scientist. 

 

Sincair isn't always consistent in arguing for skepticism but in at least one of the podcasts I've listened to with him since he was on the Rogan show, he has said he isn't positive NMN works well for humans. Studies trump podcasts - unless I really, really want something to work like NR. :)



#13 TMNMK

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Posted Today, 01:19 PM

Deleted because I'm going to make this a topic.


Edited by TMNMK, Today, 01:33 PM.






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