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Metformin shortens lifespan in old

metformin

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#1 MikeDC

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Posted 04 December 2019 - 11:28 PM


In old worms. This is indirectly related to NAD+ because metformin reduces conversion of NADH to NAD+ by inhibiting mitochandria complex I. I have always doubted metformin’s ability to extend lifespan.
Sinclair is not God. His claims need to verified.

https://www.biorxiv....0.1101/863357v1

Edited by MikeDC, 05 December 2019 - 12:28 AM.

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#2 LawrenceW

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Posted 05 December 2019 - 03:18 AM

Hello MikeDC

 

https://www.medicaln...es/280725.php#1 is regarding a study of Metformin and 180,000 humans that seems to agree with Dr. Sinclair.  It's findings are also contrary to the study of the old worm that you presented.

 

Your anti NMN bias is showing through once again.

 

One of these days you will actually try some NMN and finally understand what you have been missing out on all these years!


Edited by LawrenceW, 05 December 2019 - 03:59 AM.

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#3 Linux

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Posted 05 December 2019 - 07:45 AM

Why look at worms when we can look at people taking metformin vs those that don´t? Metformin seems to decrease mortality and morbidity in humans.

 

"In a November 2014 observational study published in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism, Christian A. Bannister, PhD, MSc, a data scientist with the Cochrane Institute of Primary Care and Public Health at Cardiff University, U.K., studied the progression to all-cause mortality among 78,241 patients with type 2 diabetes treated with metformin, 12,222 treated with sulfonylureas and 90,463 controls without diabetes, using data from the U.K. Clinical Practice Research Datalink.

 

Researchers found that patients treated with metformin monotherapy had longer survival vs. matched controls without diabetes (unadjusted mortality rates of 14.4 and 15.2, respectively, per 1,000 person-years), whereas those treated with sulfonylureas had reduced survival vs. matched controls (unadjusted mortality rates of 50.9 and 28.7 deaths per 1,000 person-years, respectively).

 

“This supports the position of metformin as first-line therapy and implies that metformin may confer benefit in nondiabetes,” the researchers wrote."

 

https://www.healio.c...ase-health-span


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#4 MikeDC

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Posted 05 December 2019 - 10:26 AM

This is not a clinical trial. The data selection is biased as some critic papers claim.
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#5 Linux

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Posted 05 December 2019 - 03:38 PM

No, you're right MikeDC. It was an observational study.

But I wouldn't call your worm study a clinical trial either.

It's much too early to throw out or declare metformin a panacea. The TAME-trial will run for years and will give us some clarity.
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#6 Linux

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Posted 05 December 2019 - 03:41 PM

It's just incredibly funny (and sad) that you of all persons scream: "bias"!
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#7 LawrenceW

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Posted 05 December 2019 - 06:03 PM

It's just incredibly funny (and sad) that you of all persons scream: "bias"!

 

Bias: a particular tendency, trend, inclination, feeling, or opinion, especially one that is preconceived or unreasoned:

 

I took 500 mg of Niagen twice per day for a 3 month period in 2017. I had a blood test done on the last day of Niagen supplementation and had no noticeable improvement in any of the following bio-markers:

 

C-Reactive Protein                 Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF-α)             Interleukin-6 (IL-6) Glucose, Serum                                 Creatine, Serum                                    BUN

BUN/Creatine ratio                                  

eGFR                                     

AST (SGOT)

ALT (SPGT)                           

HgB A1C (Diabetes)                 

Cholesterol (Total)

Triglycerides                          

HDL Cholesterol                         

LDL Cholesterol

Testosterone                                  

PSA                                    

Biological Age

 

My previous use of NMN showed improvements across the board of these biomarkers.  I based my preference for NMN on the objective results that I got from NMN supplementation that I did not receive from supplementation with NR and not from preconceived or unreasonable bias.

 

MikeDC on the other hand has never tried NMN and bases his preference for NR based on his preconceived and unreasonable bias against NMN.  


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#8 Linux

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Posted 05 December 2019 - 06:46 PM

Bias: a particular tendency, trend, inclination, feeling, or opinion, especially one that is preconceived or unreasoned:

 

 

...MikeDC on the other hand has never tried NMN and bases his preference for NR based on his preconceived and unreasonable bias against NMN.  

 

My previous comment was directed at Mike DC who called the metformin observational study "biased". Sorry for the confusion, I should have quoted him in my response.


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#9 LawrenceW

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Posted 05 December 2019 - 06:48 PM

My previous comment was directed at Mike DC who called the metformin observational study "biased". Sorry for the confusion, I should have quoted him in my response.

 

 

Thanks for clearing that up Linux.



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#10 TaiChiKid

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Posted 08 December 2019 - 04:46 AM

Here is a free link to the actual study, showing how the researchers differentiated diabetic vs non-, and old vs young.

 

In summary:

A just released study on the effects of metformin on aged populations:

Late life metformin treatment limits cell survival and shortens lifespan by triggering an aging-associated failure of energy metabolism

A free full link to the study:  https://www.biorxiv....1/863357v1.full

 

Summary

Stabilization of cellular ATP levels alleviates late life metformin toxicity in vitro and in vivo.

    Late life metformin treatment limits cell survival and shortens lifespan.

    Metformin exacerbates aging-associated mitochondrial dysfunction causing fatal ATP exhaustion.

    Old cells fail to upregulate glycolysis as a compensatory response to metformin.

    The dietary restriction (DR) mimetic response to metformin is abrogated in old animals.

    PKA and not AMPK pathway instigates the early life DR response to metformin.

 

Except

    Degradation of fatal ATP exhaustion may be counteracted by simultaneous use of rapamycin.


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#11 Daniel Cooper

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Posted 11 December 2019 - 12:02 AM

If I were an elderly worm the OP's study would be greatly concerning to me.

 

 

 

 

 


Edited by Daniel Cooper, 11 December 2019 - 12:02 AM.

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