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Diluting blood plasma rejuvenates tissue, reverses aging in mice

diluting blood plasma rejuvenates tissue reverses aging in mice young blood diluting blood rejuvenation

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#1 dalack

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Posted 17 June 2020 - 04:55 AM


Interesting research

https://news.berkele...-aging-in-mice/


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#2 Nate-2004

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Posted 17 June 2020 - 05:45 PM

This was discussed at length on this site here:

 

https://joshmitteldo...-the-old-blood/

 

I am very interested in experimentation with this or having someone well trained in transfusions do this to me, rather than transfusing someone's blood into me. Perhaps synthetic blood will soon be a thing that will ultimately solve any issues here.



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#3 jack black

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Posted 19 June 2020 - 03:27 PM

yup, i saw it in news here: https://www.scienced...00615115724.htm

i better start donating my plasma. i believe you can get paid for that too.


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#4 Raphy

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Posted 25 June 2020 - 10:15 AM

Hello guys,

 

Anyone in the UK that would want to sync up with me to try to replicate this on ourselves?

 

Thanks

Raphael



#5 Smith

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Posted 27 June 2020 - 09:38 PM

So, lets talk about this.  The paper seems to dilute the blood plasma by removing nearly half the blood plasma and replacing it with saline and albumin protein. 

 

When you donate blood plasma, don't they do EXACTLY the same thing? Except they don't take half your plasma and I don't think you get protein.  I'm not sure how important the albumin is (the paper claims its not important at all), but shouldn't donating blood plasma at your local red cross be nearly the same as the dilution method used in the research?  You may have to donate multiple times to replace half your plasma though, but in the US, I think you can donate up to 2x per week in some areas.

 

Regular plasma donors should be reporting increase health benefits or rejuvenation.


Edited by Smith, 27 June 2020 - 10:22 PM.

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#6 rodentman

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Posted 27 June 2020 - 10:22 PM

Hello guys,

 

Anyone in the UK that would want to sync up with me to try to replicate this on ourselves?

 

Thanks

Raphael

 

This new Conboy’s paper saw results from a process that sounds like Plasmapheresis, which is about $1500 per procedure in the U.S.
 
If it only needs to be done once in a while, that is fine, but if it has to be done every month th,at would be pretty costly.
 
Another option is plasma donation, but that isn't quite the same thing, and can only be done for 1/4 of the plasma at a time, but it's free... actually, they pay you like $30.00/donation.  I know there is evidence of health benefits for blood donors, so it's something to consider.


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#7 Smith

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Posted 27 June 2020 - 10:26 PM

 

This new Conboy’s paper saw results from a process that sounds like Plasmapheresis, which is about $1500 per procedure in the U.S.
 
If it only needs to be done once in a while, that is fine, but if it has to be done every month th,at would be pretty costly.
 
Another option is plasma donation, but that isn't quite the same thing, and can only be done for 1/4 of the plasma at a time, but it's free... actually, they pay you like $30.00/donation.  I know there is evidence of health benefits for blood donors, so it's something to consider.

 

 

In Plasmapheresis, don't they replace your plasma with donated plasma in some cases? 

 

In plasma donation, they replace your plasma with saline, which is more in line with the paper.  But only something like 2/3 pint per donation; however, in some areas you can donate 2x per week.

 

What confuses me is, if diluting your plasma was good for you, why are we seeing reports showing negative health effects in areas where people donate a lot of plasma?


Edited by Smith, 27 June 2020 - 10:28 PM.


#8 rodentman

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Posted 27 June 2020 - 10:43 PM

In Plasmapheresis, don't they replace your plasma with donated plasma in some cases? 

 

In plasma donation, they replace your plasma with saline, which is more in line with the paper.  But only something like 2/3 pint per donation; however, in some areas you can donate 2x per week.

 

What confuses me is, if diluting your plasma was good for you, why are we seeing reports showing negative health effects in areas where people donate a lot of plasma?

 

 

There are different methods used, and it's possible that some require donated plasma, but many that I'm aware of just use saline or albumin as a replacement.  It actually is a bit more costly than I had mentioned earlier, I think it's more like $3000 - $4000, and involves a few visits.  It's something I've considered for my autoimmune condition.
 
Yes, I am aware of that report, but there needs to be an asteriks with these types of 'observational studies'.  I've heard that there is a difference between those who are occasional donators, and those who donate 2x a week.  The latter are more likely to be using this as a source of income, and these people tend to have higher mortality rates in general because of diet and substandard health care.  I suppose they may have attempted to adjust for this, but it's something to be weary of.

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#9 orion22

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Posted 28 June 2020 - 04:48 AM

In Plasmapheresis, don't they replace your plasma with donated plasma in some cases? 

 

In plasma donation, they replace your plasma with saline, which is more in line with the paper.  But only something like 2/3 pint per donation; however, in some areas you can donate 2x per week.

 

What confuses me is, if diluting your plasma was good for you, why are we seeing reports showing negative health effects in areas where people donate a lot of plasma?

maybe its like fasting if you fast for 6 hours every day it dosen t count that much but if you have fast for 6 *5 =30 hours you get something remember you only donate 7-10% of you re total blood and the results in the study are with 50% dilution the doctor did say if you don t do a reset its pointless 


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#10 Smith

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Posted 28 June 2020 - 05:22 AM

maybe its like fasting if you fast for 6 hours every day it dosen t count that much but if you have fast for 6 *5 =30 hours you get something remember you only donate 7-10% of you re total blood and the results in the study are with 50% dilution the doctor did say if you don t do a reset its pointless 

 

I think there might be promise in the technique. I tend to agree with rodentman that the report I linked showing adverse health effects of donating plasma possibly doesn't apply in this situation, because in china where poor people were preyed upon by blood plasma dealers, they were using unsterilized and dirty equipment.

 

Here in America and Europe, we can donate plasma without the concern for poor hygiene.  It could be easy enough for a member of this board to take the PhenoAge test before donating plasma, and then donate plasma 3-4 times and take another PhenoAge test to determine results (if any). Could have conclusive results within a month.


Edited by Smith, 28 June 2020 - 05:23 AM.


#11 Raphy

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Posted 28 June 2020 - 09:56 AM

I think there might be promise in the technique. I tend to agree with rodentman that the report I linked showing adverse health effects of donating plasma possibly doesn't apply in this situation, because in china where poor people were preyed upon by blood plasma dealers, they were using unsterilized and dirty equipment.

 

Here in America and Europe, we can donate plasma without the concern for poor hygiene.  It could be easy enough for a member of this board to take the PhenoAge test before donating plasma, and then donate plasma 3-4 times and take another PhenoAge test to determine results (if any). Could have conclusive results within a month.

Exactly, I hope someone does that and report.

 

Here in scotland I can't give plasma, only blood or platelets, so I can't test :/



#12 Believer

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Posted 08 July 2020 - 03:17 PM

It is very easy to take your own blood.

Done it several times.

 

Use a blood pressure cuff around the arm you want to use, bind it tightly

Get the person to clench their fist multiple times until arteries are clearly visible on the arm and hand

Apply lots of disinfectant to the area

Then use a large needle, 18G or thereabouts, to penetrate the artery. The syringe needs to be at least 10ml but preferably larger

After the needle has gone inside the artery, slowly pull back on the plunger in the syringe and let the air pressure fill the syringe. Don't pull too quickly

 

I prefer the arteries by the hand



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#13 dalack

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Posted Today, 03:32 AM

So its easy to take your own blood and saline is dirt cheap. Is it possible to buy albumin without a prescription?





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