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Strength Resistance and longevity research

strength hypertrophy longevity

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7 replies to this topic

#1 Cloomis

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Posted 05 September 2022 - 11:57 PM


I ran through the research on optimal Strength Training (ST) for longevity recently. Some of the findings that surprised me:

 

  • Muscle mass not relevant for longevity -- strength is what matters
  • Strength can be built with just 1 workout/week
  • For muscle mass, workout 2-3 times/week
  • Optimal total workout time for longevity is 20-59 minutes/week. Doing more ST than this reduces the benefit. At more than 2 hours/week of total time, longevity is worse than if you had never lifted a weight.

More details on my blog: Full Power of Strength Training


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#2 gallan

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Posted 07 September 2022 - 03:43 PM

Is there a particular full body once a week workout you could provide?  Thanks. 



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#3 mhillgizmo

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Posted 07 September 2022 - 04:21 PM

Do you have large scale and long term. studies supporting these statements?  If so, please provide links.



#4 Cloomis

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Posted 08 September 2022 - 12:50 AM

Is there a particular full body once a week workout you could provide?  Thanks. 

 

Sure. I developed my own routine, and it matches up well with this review on time-efficient training programs. (Ahh, nothing like the joy of finding a report that supports your research.)

 

Basically, hit the big compound movements, and then get out.

 

Chest -- bench press

Back -- bent-over rows or cable lat-pull downs

Legs/lower back -- Squats or deadlifts. I alternate between the two, with one week squats, the next deadlifts

 

For each of the above, do four sets of 8-12 repetitions per set. Last rep of last set should be near or to failure.

 

That's assuming access to a barbell set up. Similar exercises could be done with machines or other.

 

Get a trainer or coach if new to strength training! Squats and deadlifts are safe with proper form, but it takes some practice to learn.

 

Let me know how it goes!


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#5 Cloomis

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Posted 08 September 2022 - 02:16 AM

Do you have large scale and long term. studies supporting these statements?  If so, please provide links.

 

Sure.

 

 

There's another 12 studies and references linked from my blog post on Strength Training.


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#6 Lady4T

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Posted 24 September 2022 - 06:26 AM

Very interesting. It kind of jives with my experience -- I've known many 80 ~ 90 year olds who still functioned fairly well (live independently, do chores around the house, drive and do their own shopping, go for walks, engage in conversation, etc.), and none of them ever worked out (yes, I asked their "secret to long life"). Most of them ate what we would consider "unhealthy food" and even smoked cigarettes, and yes, most of them were taking some kind of prescription med. What I found a common theme, was that they were thin, and "happy" people -- fun to talk to.

 

Cloomis: Thanks for the info. Is there any chance that you could do a video showing the ST routine?  Or maybe piece it together with clips from other people's videos?  ;)

 

 



#7 Cloomis

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Posted 05 October 2022 - 03:59 AM

@Lady4T

 

I haven't moved into videos yet, but here are some youtubes showing home versions of the exercises I recommend:

 

For the chest, basic pushups are great. You want to do about four sets of 8-12 pushups per set. If that's hard, do them from the knees instead of toes. A beginner push-up video.
 
For back, pullups are good. If difficult to do 4 sets of near 8 reps, then can do table pullups, where you pull yourself under a table. Some home alternatives for pull-ups.
 
For legs, body squats or jumping squats are good. Lunges are another good choice. A tutorial on bodyweight squats.

 



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#8 johnhemming

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Posted 05 October 2022 - 05:52 AM

There is, of course, an issue of correlation rather than cause.  If people's biochemistry leads their satellite cells to properly differentiate then they will be stronger it then raises the question as to what correlation there is between muscle mass and strength.  It could be that if some satellite cells fail to differentiate properly that they add to muscle mass, but don't contribute to strength or don't contribute as much.  Its a senescence in the musculature sort of thing,

 

 


Edited by johnhemming, 05 October 2022 - 05:53 AM.






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