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Resveratrol for Dogs


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#1 aaaaaaal

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Posted 01 March 2007 - 09:27 AM


Hello everyone.

Ive been reading a lot of intelligent opinions on here over the past few months and must say its a great forum.

I've mainly been reading about Resveratrol and its seems an extremely interesting supplement (I take it myself).

What Id like to know is whether its a good idea to give it to my 3 year old dog?

He's half breed- doberman and german shepherd

I'd like to know whether it would provide any health benefits to him.

I guess there are lot of other dog owners on here so any opinions/info will be taken most gratefully!

Thanks, and here's to prolonging the lives of our wonderful friends ;)

Cheers.

Paul.

#2 lucid

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Posted 01 March 2007 - 11:30 AM

Resveratrol simulates calorie restriction, but it might be easier with your dog to actually reduce his diet (there are some people who are doing this but most people are lazy). de gray suggests that CR is likely to not work as well in humans due to our already long lifespans. This is just speculation though. It should work in your dog at least as well as it does in humans. However without testing dogs, we can't know for sure. Its unlikely to be toxic though. Part of the trick will be scaling down the dosage for your dog's weight. Its a lot of time / $ to do that for your dog. You have a lucky dog ;)

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#3 aaaaaaal

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Posted 01 March 2007 - 06:05 PM

Resveratrol simulates calorie restriction, but it might be easier with your dog to actually reduce his diet (there are some people who are doing this but most people are lazy). de gray suggests that CR is likely to not work as well in humans due to our already long lifespans. This is just speculation though. It should work in your dog at least as well as it does in humans. However without testing dogs, we can't know for sure. Its unlikely to be toxic though. Part of the trick will be scaling down the dosage for your dog's weight. Its a lot of time / $ to do that for your dog. You have a lucky dog ;)


Hey thanks, but actually Im the lucky one [lol]

He weights 35 kilos, I weight 80, so just give him about half my dose?

#4 malbecman

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Posted 01 March 2007 - 06:43 PM

Jorgepl22,

I've considered using ResV on my dog as well. She is a lab so I'm not sure how much more energy I would want out of her but I'm pretty sure it would help since she is a mammal/vertebrate just like the mice used in the Sinclair and Auwerx (sic) studies (and the vertebrate fish used previously).

I've also been a bit concerned about the emodin content of the supplement as the last thing I want is a dog with the "trots" [lol]

A slim dog will outlive a porky one (I've seen way too many chubby labs) so I would make sure your dog is also living a healthy lifestyle as well.

#5 lucid

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Posted 01 March 2007 - 06:48 PM

Yup half your dose would probably be fine (assuming your dose is fine for you).

#6 zoolander

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Posted 01 March 2007 - 09:09 PM

Don't you mean Reservoir Dogs and not Resveratrol Dogs?



Sorry. Had to say that.

#7 marting

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Posted 02 March 2007 - 03:05 PM

Hi!

I asked that question in another thread a while ago:

I would like to give it my aging dog - 6 yrs (around 30 kiloes, a dobermann) any idea what I should aim for? For excample, maybe one capsule of the most potent one from NSI which is also the recommended dosis for humans would be too strong? Opt for a less potent one but still with good absorption capabilities I imagine is an alternative - or maybe half a capsule of the one for NSI a day if it would not lead to problems with oxidation etc, diminsh the absorption capabilities etc. Maybe the powder version from BAC is the way to go for ease?

and one of the posters suggested:

"Well. a rat weighs about 200 grams, and your doberman weighs 30,000 grams. To account for metabolic rate differences (an approximation, there can be other factors, like biochemistry) raise the ratio to the 1/4 power:

(30,000/200)^0.25 = 3.8 - So divide the rat dose per kilogram by 3.8 to get your dog's dose per kilogram."

So if we use this formula we just need to identify the appropriate rat (or mice) dosis which I believe varies in the different studies: here are a few quotes which should be reconfirmed:

"In a toxicology study of resveratrol; Rats receiving 300 mg/kg of body weight were not harmed, but at higher doses there were adverse effects: clinically significant renal lesions, including an increased nephropathy, renal tubule dilatation, papillary necrosis, acute pelvic inflammation, dehydration, anemia ..... "

"Then we have (22.4 mg/kg per day) in the longevity study with obese mice by David Sinclair and colleagues".

and there are a few more studies out there.

another poster suggested: don't know about resveratrol dosages for dogs but the supplement routines that I give my cats are based on the amounts given per kilogram of weight in beagle studies (no good cat studies) that I've slightly tweaked over the years. I've had very, very good results with these regimens. "

One thing I noticed in another thread was the following comment:

"I remembered that dogs cannot eat grapes, so I need to find out if resveratrol is the problematic chemical".

Do anyone know anything about this? It would be great if we can work toward identifying a good (and safe) dosis for dogs

Br

Martin

#8 caston

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Posted 02 March 2007 - 03:46 PM

Personally I think it would be cruel to put a dog on CR.

I'm not making any attempts to extend my Dogs life spans even though I do love them. It will be sad when they die but if I can't handle that then how am I going to handle it when everyone else I know and love dies one at a time over the years?

I'm of the feeling that you can't convert people to immortalism they have to seek it from their own intuition. I only support making animals immortal if it is done in order to research ways that we may be able to do it in humans.

#9 marting

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Posted 02 March 2007 - 08:00 PM

I agree our pets need a good life so putting them on a strict CR diet would be a shame - but I think keeping them on healthy diet with no excessive calories and supplementing with anti aging compunds such as ALA, carnosine etc and maybe reserveratrol is a good strategy if you are interested in trying to positively maximise their potential lifespan so that you and them can enjoy each others company for as many yrs as possible.

Br

Martin

#10 aaaaaaal

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Posted 02 March 2007 - 08:48 PM

interesting coincidence marting! mines a doberman too, mixed with german shepherd. from what ive been told dobermans normally live between 8- 15 years. If i can get him up to

20 then Im hoping in 15 years or so scientists will have made a breakthrough in terms of slowing aging, or stopping it altogether. (for warm blooded mammals) anyway here's a pic
mine:

Posted Image

If you have msn messennger add me jp_footy@hotmail.co.uk and we can discuss what we think is best for our dobermans.

#11 dillon

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Posted 02 March 2007 - 11:36 PM

You must do some difficult reseach before giving your dog any typical resveratrol supplement.

Remember, any of the standard supplements are not the synthetic research grade stuff that were used in Sinclairs experiments. I believe that was from Orchid, which won't sell to any of us.

All of the standard supplements are made from 50% extracts of the giant knotweed plant (polygonum cuspidatum).

What this means, is that your dog will be ingesting not just resveratrol, but many other constituents of the knotweed plant. This may or not be harmful to the dog -- no one seems to have that information.

The knotweed plant is not harmful to people, but this doesn't mean it's safe for dogs. Grapes, chocolate, xylitol, etc., are all safe for people, but deadly for dogs.

Also many of the resveratrol supplements add other ingredients which are good for people, but I don't know if they are harmful to dogs. I take County Life's Resveratrol Plus, which also contains Grapeseed, and Grapeskin extracts, as well as Pinebark extract.

Though some people have told me that Grapeseed extract, at least in small amounts is okay for dogs, no one has been willing to make the same claim about Grapeskin extract. No one I've talked to seems to be sure which part of the grape is toxic to dogs.

My point is that we need a lot more info before we give resveratrol supplements to dogs. If anyone has any thoughts on how to obtain this info, I'm all ears.

Until then, the only prudent solution seems to be to get involved in one of the joint overseas bulk purchases of pure resveratrol powder, or to not feed the dog any resveratrol supplement

#12 marting

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Posted 03 March 2007 - 04:19 AM

Hi jorgepl22!

nice dog you got there -

Dillon, wise comments you made there - I did not know the complexity of identifying which part of grapes is bad for dogs. yes the pure stufff seems like the only safe bet for now.

Meanwhile, as you suggest let us keep the info flowing for new info on this topic.

Anyone?

Br

Martin

#13 dillon

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Posted 03 March 2007 - 04:30 AM

On a related topic -- has anyone ever given Deprenyl to their dogs? Deprenyl has also been shown to increase lifespan, when given to aging dogs (over ten years old.)

I don't know if there have been longevity studies for Deprenyl given to younger dogs. Since dogs are fairly long-lived (compared to lab rats), most Deprenyl studies seemed to focus on rodents and not canines.

Deprenyl seems to be as safe for dogs as it is for people (in low doses), and they even make a veterinary version of the drug.

#14 Matt

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Posted 03 March 2007 - 01:23 PM

I limited my dogs calories since he was 15y . Hes now 19y 3m. But only going to last a few more days I think :(

I do not at all think its cruel to limit a dogs calories, as long as its getting good nutrition. Think about the CR dog study, median lifespan was increased and quality of life was better at all ages.

#15 marting

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Posted 03 March 2007 - 04:20 PM

Hi, please find below a single case study on an anti-aging reigmen for a dog - The owner was the well known anti-aging doc Dr. Ronald Klatz. if anyone else have some experiences along these lines, please put them forward.

First, Matt sorry to hear about your dog but at least it has had a long good life equivalent to 106 human yrs - anyway I hope it may recover and get some more time after all - what kind of dog do you have?

Dillon, yes Deprenyl is interesting - I recall hearing on a veternary version of deprenyl launched in the early 90´ties (maybe before that)? This companies seems, though to have vanish since then - maybe it was bought by one of the bigger ones such as DSM etc or simply went out of business - which company/brand are you referring to? of course one can always just use the "human" version.

Br

Martin

I found this note on: http://www.worldheal...p/133,1125.html - I originally found a reference to the link from another site (sorry can not recall) where a poster mentioned that: "Lex was not on CR, but they managed to push him to the equivalent human age of 115. He would likely have lasted way past 120 had they not decided to put him to sleep after his leg handicap caused by the stroke.
The items on his regimen which were probably significant in extending his lifespan were PBN, deprenyl, DHEA, melatonin and the aloe vera extract, Acemannan".

ps: PBN is one of the spin traps right?


The Anti-Aging Program of Lex “the Wonder Dog”

I am often asked by many people what they can do to improve the quality of their pet’s life, while at the same time gaining increased quantity. People love their pets will go to any lengths and spend any amount of money on their pets to not lose them before it is absolutely unavoidable. In 1991, my Airedale Lex had turned into an 11 year-old old dog. As an expert and one of the founders of the clinical specialty anti-aging medicineit became very embarrassing for me to have an aging pet whose coat was turning gray, and was experiencing the unpleasant disabilities and symptoms of old age. I had already been experimenting with anti-aging drugs on myself, my friends, patients and even my own mother without ill effects, so I thought these substances were at last proven safe enough to try on my best friend Lex. Lex was a champion Airedale, the mascot of the A4M. The life expectancy for Airedales is about 12 years, and Lex had started to fail about age 10.

I began Lex on an anti-aging regimen and saw startling, rapid effects. Within six months, Lex had deaged to the condition of an 8 year-old dog. He was able to jump three-foot fences, his coat returned to dark black-brown. His eyes became bright and animated, when before they were cloudy and dull. Lex ran and played vigorously with dogs 5 years younger than he.
Lex suffered a stroke at age 16. Although he made a good recovery by age 16 ½, he developed a weakness in his hind legs, thereby limiting his activity and the quality of his life. Rather than have him suffer, he was put to sleep at the equivalent of human age of 116 years. While Lex could have been kept alive for another two or more years (as would be the goal of geriatric medicine), anti-aging scientists seek to enhance quality of life -- not just to extend its quantity.

Lex serves as a metaphor for the paramount importance of living a longer healthier happier lifespan. This pup at heart proves that to win the game of life, we need not keep people alive for the longest period of time possible. The winners are those whose lives are blessed with a prolonged period of satisfaction and enjoyment, and that goal is well within the reach of each and every one of us.
Lex served his role as a pioneer of anti-aging research well. His dramatic age reversing accomplishments demonstrated to all who knew him that anti-aging therapies were both safe and effective. In a real and personal way, Lex showed me what could be easily accomplished with minimal interventions if only we are willing to believe that aging is not inevitable!

Protocol

Exercise:
2-3 brisk walks 10-15 minutes daily, stair climbing and ball retrieval 10 minutes daily

Supplements:
1 pediatric vitamin with meal 2 times per day
200 mcg chromium picolinate
10,000 IU vitamin A 1 mg folic acid
5,000 IU beta carotene
100 mg CoEnzyme Q-10
200 mg vitamin C
2 capsules Acemanon
400 IU vitamin E
Ginkgo biloba extract
100 mcg selenium
Ginseng
Vitamin B complex
6 capsules of liquid Kyolic garlic
100 mg niacin
Green tea extract

Hormones and Drugs:
Hydergine
HGH stimulating compounds (amino acids)
PBN (mitochondrial antioxidant shown to extend the lives of laboratory animals
25 mg DHEA
5 mg Deprenyl every other day
2 mg melatonin nightly

Dietary Protocol:
Science Diet for Seniors
2 Kosher hot dogs with sauerkraut and mustard on a bun, per week
1 slice of low-fat pizza per week (his favorite)

Dosis:
Because Lex was 65 pounds, he received one-half the dose of supplements normally recommended for humans.

NOTE: This protocol was custom designed for Lex, as an older animal, and should not be construed as a valid program for any other subject.

#16 curious_sle

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Posted 04 March 2007 - 12:40 PM

Kosher hot dogs? And there i thought this whole thing was hard to top. SCNR

#17 aaaaaaal

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 01:31 PM

Hi, marting, basically your saying (or Dr. Klatz is even) that I should provide my dog with these supplements everyday?

How much do you think this would come to, and would it be worth it?

If I had to choose 5, which do you think would be the most important to provide to Pingo?

Supplements:
1 pediatric vitamin with meal 2 times per day
200 mcg chromium picolinate
10,000 IU vitamin A 1 mg folic acid
5,000 IU beta carotene
100 mg CoEnzyme Q-10
200 mg vitamin C
2 capsules Acemanon
400 IU vitamin E
Ginkgo biloba extract
100 mcg selenium
Ginseng
Vitamin B complex
6 capsules of liquid Kyolic garlic
100 mg niacin
Green tea extract

Hormones and Drugs:
Hydergine
HGH stimulating compounds (amino acids)
PBN (mitochondrial antioxidant shown to extend the lives of laboratory animals
25 mg DHEA
5 mg Deprenyl every other day
2 mg melatonin nightly

Thanks mate.

#18 aaaaaaal

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 02:30 PM

Ok, Ive made a list of bookmarks of what Im going to order and give to Pingo on a daily basis. (This is from Supplements only, so far)

If theres something important missing or something which shouldnt be there (i.e- could be harmful to him) could someone please let me know, cheers ;)

Korean Ginseng
http://www.justvitam...nseng-1055.aspx
__________________

Milk Thistle
http://www.justvitam...istle-1059.aspx
__________________
Visisoft Lutein (I know dogs can go blind quite early)
http://www.justvitam...utein-1102.aspx
__________________
CoEnzymq Q10
http://www.justvitam...-30mg-1021.aspx
__________________
Kelp
http://www.justvitam.../Kelp-1053.aspx
__________________
MultiVitamins and Minerals
http://www.justvitam...neral-1062.aspx
__________________
Omega 3 Fish oil
http://www.justvitam...500mg-1069.aspx
__________________
Pomegranate Extract
http://www.justvitam...anate-1101.aspx
__________________
Zinc Gluconate
http://www.justvitam...onate-1092.aspx
__________________
Brewers Yeast
http://www.justvitam...onate-1092.aspx
__________________
Alpha Lipoic Acid
http://www.justvitam...onate-1092.aspx
__________________

Green Tea Extract:
http://www.healthydi.....Extract~17.95
__________________

Odourless Garlic Supplement.
http://www.healthydi.....s Garlic~1.95
__________________

Selenium, A, C & E
http://www.healthydi...c... C & E~2.95
__________________

Echinacea Purpurea
http://www.healthydi.....Purpurea~2.99
__________________

Edited by jorgepl22, 07 March 2007 - 02:49 PM.


#19 marting

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 05:06 PM

Hi Paul!

If you know of any holistic vets in the UK who ideally advocate the use of supplements too, I would suggest you to consult one of these and discuss the regimen in more details. This would be a good start although I know that these vets are hard to find.

However, my take on it as a "layman researchers" is that you may not need to supplement so aggressively yet (if at all) as Pingo is still relatively young. My dog is slowly approaching seven and then I feel it is take to being a more expanded anti-aging regimen.

I believe that some of the ingredients you list would be provided in a good premium brand of dog food or the specialised whole food powders described below. I normally buy the dried versions rather than the can stuff. I also keep my dog on a low fat and low calorie diet of course still packed with the necessary nutrients. Did you have a look at the CR study on dogs which one of the other posters referred too? Here are two links: http://www.purina.co...estriction.aspx , and http://www.upenn.edu...icle.php?id=144

From there, I would consider supplemeting with some additional ingredients depending on the age of the dog, a genetic tedency to certain diseases, and the size of your wallet ;) . I have over a number of years now being giving my dog glucosamin + MSM for joint support. She also gets glisodin (SOD), carnosine+ alpha lipic acid + acetyl-l-carnitine (ALCAR). Here is one firm´s take on the latter two:

What about Juvenon for pets?
The compounds in the Juvenon formula have been demonstrated to have positive effects on both mental and physical activities in laboratory animals. There is also experimental evidence (both in vivo and in vitro ) indicating that the compounds in the supplement help to protect tissues by inhibiting the production of tissue-damaging free-radicals. The tissues protected include skeletal muscle, heart, liver, and tissue comprising the nervous system. The majority of these studies were with dogs and rodents. Unlike dogs and many other animals, cats cannot tolerate the Juvenon product because they are sensitive to one of the active compounds, alpha lipoic acid. The metabolism of lipoic acid by the liver of the cat is very different from other animals, and results in liver toxicity. Therefore, Juvenon is not recommended for cats.
Recommended dose: 1 tablet/ 50 lb/day or ¼ tablet/12 lbs/day. This dose can be applied to dogs, hamsters and other rodents, and horses.

Juveon contains 1000 mg ALCAR and 400 mg ALA per 2 tablets. Personally, I feel you can get better deals than the one from Juveon.com.

You also mentioned Omega 3, and I think this is a good supplement as well. I give my dog UDO´s Choice which is an oil I just pour over her food. I have provided a note on a vet´s take on Omega 3 supplementation for animals at the end of this reply.

There are some supplement companies that do offer specialised products for pets that could be added. One company is Vitamin Research Products. Check them out on http://www.vrp.com/. Of interesting products could be their naural whole food concentrate, rejuvanet pet, and RNA - The latter I believe, however, more for aging dogs - see case study in the end of this reply.

I also as mentioned give my dog carnosine. One company www.Ethos.ag has such a product for pets (however identical with the human version so if more grams is prefered/cheapter opt for that one should you buy from there). I personally think it is too expensive and I do not buy their arguments for why their carnosine version should be better than any other brand such as NOW Foods etc. But you can use the website for some informational purposes on dosage and for some interesting mice pics. Note that they have a set up in the UK: www.ethosplan.com which may be sligtly cheaper (still to expensive IMO) but which does offer some discounts through a membership etc.

Finally, I should also mentioned that e.g. The life extension foundation offers an interesting pet product (www.lef.org) - Also Udo´`s Choice used to offer something in the past. And there a probably a number of other potentially interesting suppliers, I do not know of. I do wonder whether their dosis of e.g. ALA, ALCAR etc is potent enoug in these concentrated form, so this is something that may be good to ask about - Overall it may be better to supplement directly with a few of the most important ones.

In the future, I wil look into some of the suggested suplemments from the case of Dr Katz e.g. Deprenyl, PBN, and the Aloe vera extract. I still also hope that we will come closer at finding out whether reservatrol is good for dogs or not.

Br,

Martin


Here are some of the notes I mentioned above:


Pet Corner
Omega-3 Fatty Acids in our Pets
Gary L. Ailes, DVM
source (vrp.com - select newsletter from Dec 2006)

As the shift in weather continues and the air turns a bit more towards bitter, we may find our pets spending more time inside. The question that comes to mind is what can we do to help protect their health while indoors?

One simple food additive would be the use of flax seed oil or, better yet, ground fresh flax seeds. Flax seeds provide a high level of omega-3 fatty acids, which are usually scarce in the diet. Flax seeds also have omega-6 and omega-9 fatty acids as well.

Essential fatty acids are required for normal brain development, cell membrane and hormone formation, metabolism of cholesterol and triglycerides, and cellular energy production. They also serve as precursors to prostaglandins. In addition, essential fatty acids have been used to decrease arthritic pain by blocking inflammation. Flax seed oil is an excellent immune modulator and helps to improve immunity in diseases such as lupus. Like in humans, in pets, the omega-3 fatty acids are metabolized into anti-inflammatory products. The omega-6 fatty acids can either follow the same process or enter the inflammatory cascade.

It is necessary for pets to have both of these essential fatty acids to function normally. If there are not enough omega-3s our pets experience too much inflammation. If there are not enough omega-6s there is not enough stiffness in the vascular system to maintain normal blood pressure. Considering the normal diet of most pets, adding more omega-3 fatty acids is definitely an ideal way to improve health.

When deciding to add flax seed oil or ground flax seeds to your pet's diet, we must remember that flax seed oil must be cold pressed, needs to come from a very reliable source, must be stored in the refrigerator and must be used within 6 weeks of the time the bottle is opened. High quality flax seed oil is a good choice if the contents of the bottle are to be used fast enough.

The other option is to use ground flax seeds. The seeds perfectly encapsulate the oil contained within and have other beneficial constituents. The balance of other materials makes the seed a great choice. They must be ground in order to release the benefit of the oil and fiber. There is both absorbable and non-absorbable fiber contained within the seeds and both provide benefits to our pets' bodies.

I usually give small dogs about ½ to 1 teaspoon per day, 20 to 50 pound dogs 1 to 2 teaspoons per day, 50 to 100 pound dogs 2 to 3 teaspoons per day and dogs above 100 pounds 1 to 1 ½ tablespoons per day. Remember that along with the fatty acids come calories and some adjustment in the total calorie intake is likely needed. For every teaspoon of flax seeds, reduce the amount of food by about the same amount as there are 13 calories per teaspoon of flax seeds. To grind the flax seeds, use a small hand held coffee bean grinder and add the ground material to the food.

It will take some time to notice a change in your pet. For example, it could take 4 to 6 weeks to notice any effect on Inflammation in the skin or joints.

Omega-3 fatty acids effects in humans have been extensively reported in the medical literature. Supplement savvy pet owners who are consuming omega-3 supplements should keep in mind that their animals can derive just as much benefit from these all-too-important essential fatty acids.

---------------------------------------------------

Nutritional Information for Your Pet
Is There Still Life in My Old Pet? My Experiment with RNA and Aging Dogs
Wendy Volhard

Manfred, my 25-pound Standard wire-haired Dachshund, was enjoying his 14th year when in the middle of the summer he had an ischemic event much like a stroke.

Curled up to the right, with a slack jaw and right eye drooping, he obviously had suffered some neurological damage. Given that he'd been treated for liver disease his whole life, I didn't feel I had too much of a chance of bringing him back to any kind of quality of life.

I thought it was worth a try to put Manfred onto a special diet and give him regular acupuncture treatments and chiropractic care. Over the next weeks, he slowly improved. He could walk—albeit in a large circle—his eye returned to normal and the only residual damage seemed to be an inability to completely open his mouth. Yet his illness never stopped him from eating and enjoying his food.

His main diet change was to use bison as a primary protein source, plus herbs that supported his liver, heart and circulation. It made a huge difference to his overall well-being and he managed to start walking in a straight line. Complete bloodwork was done at the end of January 2004. While triglyceride and lipase levels were lowered and the kidneys improved over his previous tests, the rest of his blood levels looked alarming. He had elevated liver enzyme levels, alkaline phosphatase (alk phos) that was sky high, and cholesterol and total protein levels were at high normal. Something had to be done and soon.

Manfred and RNA
A friend sent me a copy of Vitamin Research News featuring articles about Ribonucleic Acid (RNA). These reports mentioned experiments with several old dogs in their teens that were not in good shape. Just by adding RNA to their diets, the dogs had become puppy-like and lived many more years. I imwww.ely ordered some.
I began adding 1/8th teaspoon to each morning meal. Manfred became livelier and insisted on returning to his long morning walks. On his regular monthly visit to his veterinarian three weeks later the impacted anal glands Manfred had been bothered by were no longer impacted. I was sent home with the admonition to continue whatever I was doing!

The following month's checkup revealed the same—no impaction. The vet noticed that Manfred's coat and skin quality were improving. The fuzzy soft coat that had replaced his wiry covering in his last years was turning a deep dark brown. His skin, which was wrinkly with flaky spots, was changing for the better. He seemed to be stronger.

Diggy and RNA
Given this success, I introduced the same regimen to Manfreds half-sister, Diggy, who was just turning 13 1/2. Bloodwork had been done on her a month before and I was horrified to see that she seemed to be showing signs just like Manfred of elevated liver enzymes, very high alk phos level, a kidney reading just over high-normal, and high lipase and cholesterol.

I was obviously battling some genetic disease. At a young age, both dogs were diagnosed with hypothyroidism; both were on thyroid medication. Diggy had the added complication of large fatty cysts under her left front leg, over her spleen and in between her shoulder blades. They were beginning to interfere with her forward mobility.
At the end of July, we did a complete blood workup on both dogs, consisting of a CBC and chemistry screen plus a thyroid panel to see if there were any noticeable changes (Table 1). At the time of the 12-hour-fasting blood tests, both dogs had been receiving 1/8th teaspoon of RNA daily in their morning meal for 14 weeks.


It is interesting to note that the changes were different for each dog. Some levels went up for the female, but all levels listed went down for the male. I suspect their bodies were balancing out in their own way. We are still working on reducing the alk phos levels. The large fatty cysts on Diggy began to diminish and today are hardly noticeable.

Both dogs' thyroid readings had been high and the vet suggested I cut the medication by half. After re-reading all the literature on RNA and noticing that the safety parameters were high, I decided to return to 1/8th teaspoon twice a day. Both dogs are very lively, enjoy their food, their walks and are playing with the Labrador and Dachshund puppies in the family. Their cognitive ability has increased and they are enjoying their newfound quality of life. At the end of January, their blood work will be done again and it will be interesting to see if more changes have taken place.

Other Successes with RNA
Buoyed by the results with my own dogs, I wove this information into my conferences and seminars, and introduced RNA to many of my dog associates.

Success stories include an 11-year-old Labrador Retriever stud dog that showed a dramatic increase in sperm count; a seven-year-old German Shepherd female whose anxiety around other dogs was calmed; and a 19-year-old cat that was aging rapidly, had lost interest in food and was sleeping most of his life away—now charging around, playing, going outside and stalking in the grass.

All the older dogs and cats that have had RNA added to their daily ration show signs of more energy and general overall vitality and cognitive ability.

References
Vitamin Research Newsletters 2003-2004 http://www.vrp.com/art/1129.asp.
Holistic Guide for a Healthy Dog, Volhard/Brown, DVM, Howell Book House, NY 2000.

#20 aaaaaaal

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 06:02 PM

Thanks Martin, absolutely loads of great information there!

Sure, Pingo is just 3 years old, but I want to start protecting him for the future.

I dont want him to develop problems, and then have to treat him, I want to forsee this health issues and minimise them as much as possible.


I think if I start giving him his daily supplements now I will really see the effects of the intakes when he's 12/13/14 years old, and Im hoping when he gets to that stage with the help of years of supplements he'll be in absolutely fantastic condition for his age.

If I wait for the problems to arise then it may be more difficult to treat them?

A lot of the supplements I have chosen are for his limbs/joints,etc so he's still very active when he's older.

Others are mainly antidioxants and for the immune system, so that his body will be ready to fight illness when he's challenged by it in later life.

What Im going to try and do is make his body and mind stay as young as possible, hopefully Ill be successful ;)

Anyway, heres a nice article to finish off, a dog which is 27 years old ;)

http://dogsinthenews...les/020918a.htm

Paul.

#21 Matt

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 07:10 PM

My dog died a few hours after I posted above on saturday. After I went back downstairs he couldn't walk properly because of his front lef was totally gone and he had weak back legs so couldnt support himself. So my father took him to the vets and they suggested to put him down. Which I am a little angry about because he wasnt even given more than 6 hours to recover. Could have gave him more steroids or something :( -- Although it would have only been a short term fix. I feel so sad :(

can see pics and read here:

http://matts-cr.blogspot.com/

pics of him http://matts-cr.blog...7/02/lucky.html

He was a cross breed. Labrador and something else. We had him given to us when he was very young, some weeks old.

Its so strange now waking up in the morning and hes not there :( I just can be bothered doing anything, except staring at nothing, and thinking.

Edited by Matt, 07 March 2007 - 07:22 PM.


#22 aaaaaaal

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Posted 11 March 2007 - 09:08 AM

Sorry to hear about your loss Matt, however, it seems he had a wonderful life with you and 19 years is a fantastic achievement for a dog.

Ive now finalised my list of what to give to Pingo. All the supplements together will come to around £30/£40 a month which I think is worth it if theres any chance his lifespan will be increased.

These are the supplements I will provide to Pingo:

Carnosine
DHEA
Melatonin
Fruit and Vegetable Capsules
Life Extension Dog Mix
Milk Thistle
Visisoft Lutein
Q-Enzyme Q10
Kelp
Multi Vitamins and Mineral
Omega 3 Fish Oil
Pomegranate Extract
Zinc Gluconate
Alpha Lipoic Acid
Brewers Yeast
Green Tea Extract
Selenium A, C & E
Echinacea Purpurea
Gingko Bilboa & Ginseng
AlOE VERA
Resveratrol (20mg a day to start)

What I will probably do is purchase an electrical mixer and mix the supplements in with his food.

I know this may some a bit too extreme, so if theres anything there could be harmful to him I'd appreciate opinions from those who are more knowledgable

If its simply too aggressive, which supplements should I consider removing?

(i just want to know which supplements could be harmful, money's not an issue ;))

#23 tintinet

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Posted 11 March 2007 - 10:04 AM

Very sorry about your loss also, Matt!

Funny (in very bitter-and perhaps not so sweet manner) how one's image of life as stable continuity occasionally (if you are "lucky") gets disrupted by sudden and dramatic change. All things must pass, so they say, although we so often tend to ignore that apparent inexorability.

A perhaps more economical and, again, perhaps just as effective method of lengthening your pet's health and longevity would be caloric restriction with optimal nutrition.

In the meantime, I suggest attempting to keep moving during this time of grief. Try as many methods of relief you think might be effective. For myself, discussions with close friends, journal writing, and mindfulness meditation seemed particularly helpful.
You may find these approaches/techniques will come in handy in the unpredictable future.

Best wishes and condolences.

#24 aaaaaaal

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Posted 11 March 2007 - 10:42 AM

Often, the worst thing about the death of a dog is that you are infact losing your best friend.

People and dogs have wonderful relationships, and the thing which is hardest to take is that when you wake up in the morning, the pain of your loyal and faithful companion no longer being is hard to put into words.

I understand it can be difficult, as I had a cat which died at the age of 22 (when I was just 17)

She was a whole part of my life, when I was born she had already been with my parents for 5 years. When she died I couldn't imagine my life without her. I cried every night for around 2/3 months and never a day passes when I dont think about her.

However, then came along Pingo, my dog, who has brought me great happiness and brought an enormous fulfilment to my life, one which i never thought could be replaced.

When humans die, you often talk about all the good times you enjoyed with that person, with friends and relatives.

The thing with a pet (a dog more than anything else) is that those really special moments you experience are when the 2 of you are both alone, and the outside world doesn't matter. Do you remember that glaring look you got? That was a message saying "your are the centre of my world".

Some people dont understand that often, losing a pet, is much more painful than losing a relative/family member. To you they ARE family, and nothing or nobody will be able to convince you otherwise.

This was written for Dobermans, but I hope it will bring comfort to you:

The hardest part of owning a Dobe is to be confronted with evidence of his mortality, that a loyal companion may no longer be there. It is then that you are faced with your only disappointment in owning a Dobe. - the loss of your loved one. "It is then in these hours ... that he will best be able to face this difficult time, if he looks to the
demeanor of his companion ... for it is their distinction that they squarely face adversity, not unlike that of a professional soldier."

It will get easier, I promise.

Paul.

Edited by jorgepl22, 11 March 2007 - 11:02 AM.


#25 marting

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 12:21 AM

Hi Matt - condolences from me as well - I viewed one of the pics and he looked like a very nice dog. If it is any comfort as Paul said, he had a long good life with you. Some fine words by the other posters. If I may add, I have found it useful to get a new dog after some time has passed.

Paul, your regimen looks good - pingo will be one healthy dog ;) - I would probably add Alcar as well as it goes well together with ALA - Btw, when using ALA, it is recommended to supplement with Biotin - so make sure he gets enough Vitamin B and maybe additional biotin- Also for optimal joint preventation you may want to consider supplement with MSM and Glucosamin Sulfat like one capsule a day of each in dosis between 500 mg - 1000 mg.

BTW, should you or other who read this ever have the need for a promising joint improvement supplement for dogs, I have heard good stuff about this Australian brand at: http://www.doggonepain.com/ - I know of one lady who used it on her dog with good results.

Anyway, in regard to the regimen, you could maybe reduce some of the vitamins if there are adequately covered in e.g. the life extension foundation´s dog mix and your regular dog food - I guess you are using a good premium brand for this?

Also, you might want to give a supplement of vitamin E that contains the different kinds and not just the regular one - Check out AOR, LEF for more info for why this is better.

So you are not holding back on the reservatrol for now - well 20 mg is not so much but I would still like to know if dogs can actually tolerate grapes?

Finally, maybe DHEA is better for when he is older and had a decreased level of DHEA? - Hmn, well if that is the case - not sure on how dog´s DHEA level peak during its life.

Br

Martin

PS: Beautiful note on the doberman -

#26 aaaaaaal

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Posted 20 March 2007 - 08:17 AM

marting, and anyone else....

check out a compilation i made of pingo earlier this week...

http://www.youtube.com/my_videos

He really is the best :D

#27 aaaaaaal

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Posted 18 May 2007 - 01:00 AM

Right, I've been searching for reseveratrol studys on dogs and have found absolutely NOTHING.

If anyone knows where I can find info about the effect resveratrol has on dogs please post any findings you have here.

I would like to start providing my 4 year old best friend with it but want to be 150% sure that it can causes him absolutely no harm.

Any anti-aging related herbs/supplements please also post them here :)

Thanks.

#28 bkonia

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Posted 25 May 2007 - 06:42 PM

Ive now finalised my list of what to give to Pingo. All the supplements together will come to around £30/£40 a month which I think is worth it if theres any chance his lifespan will be increased.


Hi Jorge,

I noticed that you posted this topic a few months back and I'm wondering how Pingo is doing on these supplements. I'm considering supplementing my dogs with CoQ10, Resveratrol, Pomegranate and Fish Oil.

--Brad

#29 tomnook

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Posted 19 November 2007 - 07:39 PM

Hi everyone

I've been researching an anti-aging regime for my 8.5 year old bullmastiff, Sam, for a while now and Google gave me links to this post on ImmInst.org and also another about supplement dosages for dogs. I thought that some of you may be interested in some of the things I've discovered so far.

Sam is my 4th bullmastiff, I lost the others at 5yrs old, 7.5yrs and 9yrs - the average lifespan of this breed is around 8-10 years.
During the recent pet food recall in the US I investigated alternative feeding options for dogs including premium kibble and raw meaty bone diets but the one which caught my attention was one researched by a dog breeder over a period of 30 years, Wendy Volhard, marting quotes one of her articles earlier in this post. This quote caught my attention from her website.

"Whereas the normal life span of a Newfoundland in 1998 was 6.2-6.7 years according to a national survey done by the Newfoundland Club of America, our dogs, and other dogs following the Natural Diet, live up until 15 years of age"

Since my objective is to give Sam a longer healthier life this diet seemed to be ideal - after a lifetime of eating Eukanuba Lamb and Rice I switched Sam onto 100% bio natural food over a period of three months.
The changes in him have been unbelievable - from a shinier coat within the first two weeks to having a more "puppy like" demeanour and running up and down stairs which he would only cautiously approach a few months ago.
I do now give Sam a number of supplements in addition to the diet however I am convinced that the diet plays the most significant part in his ongoing healthy condition.

Out of interest I put his weekly feeding regime into Chron-O-Meter and was surprised to see that not only is his diet almost prefectly balanced it also has more than 100% of all the listed recommended (for humans) vitamin and minerals - his diet is far better balanced than my own!

Briefly the diet consists of :
Mon-Sat
AM
Oats
Millet or Buckwheat Groats
Mixed vegetables - steamed or processed
Safflower Oil
Boiled Egg with shell
Blackstrap molasses
Vitamin E (supplement)
Vitamin B complex
Vitamin C
Yogurt - full fat

PM
Raw meat - beef, heart, liver, muscle (Cottage Cheese instead of meat on Sat PM)
Cod liver oil
Kelp
Garlic
Wheat Germ
Dry Herbs (mix)
Vitamin C
Apple Cider Vinegar
Brewers Yeast
Bone Meal
Wheat Bran
Fruit (Tablespoon or so)

This diet is for 6 days of the week, on the 7th day Sam is fasted in the evening and his AM diet is :
Grains/Vegetables
Honey
Yogurt

Wendy Volhard has also been advocating the use of DHEA, Melatonin, glandulars, enzymes, DHA and RNA along with the more "normal" supplements such as Glucosamine and amino acids - for at least the past 7 years since her book "The Holistic Guide for a Healthy Dog" was published.

Sam's supplements, in addition to the ones listed above:

AM
EPA 400mg/DHA 200mg
SAM-e 200mg
DHEA 25mg every other day
CoQ-10 100mg (daily for at least the past two years - his father had cardiovascular problems and died at 6 yrs old)
Dasuquin - Glucosamine/MSM/Chondroitin (for arthritis)
Vitamin D 400iu
ALA 100mg
ALCAR 500mg
Otho-Core 1 capsule

PM
Ortho-Core 1 capsule

Evening
1.5mg Melatonin

Since starting the diet Sam's bloodwork and urine has been tested every couple of months with the latest reuslt showing everything within the normal range for the first time in his life.

I've also been in touch with Dr Klatz who's dog, Lex, lived several years longer than average for his breed, possibly due to the use of Deprenyl, Hydergine, PBN and others and I'm considering incorporating some of these into Sam's protocol along with resveratrol at 100mg per day.

If anyone has other suggestions about possible supplements which haven't already been made then I'd be very grateful to hear about them.

I thought these couple of sites looked interesting but couldn't really decipher much about the first one from the information given :

http://www.thegiftfo...id=16&Itemid=30

http://www.petgh.com/pro-mino-max.html

Thanks!


Dave

Click HERE to rent this advertising spot to support LongeCity (this will replace the google ad above).

#30 missminni

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Posted 20 November 2007 - 08:21 PM


I have two American Bulldogs that will turn 9 in Jan. If you believe what you read they
don't usually live past 11, but breeders I know have Am Bulls that live to be 20.
It's all about diet and vaccines. Vaccines are really killing dogs. Unnecessary annual
vaccines and dog food not fit to be eaten by any living thing, have been shortening
dogs life spans. Dogs used to live longer before "dog food" and vaccines. Science Diet
and Eukanuba are among the worst. They are carcinogenic.

For a while I was actually making my own dog food but it was far too time consuming.
After trying a few commercial dog foods that claimed to be natural etc, I settled on
Wellness hormone free lamb (kibble) dog food. It was affordable and had good ingredients
and they loved it and do well on it. I mix in fresh cilantro or
broccoli or some leafy green, canned wild salmon, an egg or sometimes
red meat, sometimes oatmeal.
And glucosamine at the rate of 1gr for every 35 lbs of body weight.
And 200 mg of restreverol. I plan to up the restreverol as soon as I run out of what I am
giving them - Jarrow 100, which has a high emodin content. I know 3 sent me running.
But they do fine on the 200 mg and are in great shape inside and out. They just saw
the vet to have their teeth cleaned and he did blood work etc, and said they were 100% healthy.
My male, who is
125 lbs started to have hip stiffness about a year ago and had a difficult time going upstairs.
As soon as I started him on the hi dose glucosamine he was totally fine within 24 hours and had
no problem with the stairs. At 125 lbs I give him 4 grams glucosamine a day.
I occasionally give them
COQ10 and L-Carnitine, but not on a daily basis. I'd rather increase the resveratrol.
They have been on the 200 mg res for maybe 6 to 8 months. I can't say what the improvements
is but it definitely didn't hurt them.
This is a picture of them. Thats Busta on the left and Minni on the right.
This was taken a few years ago, but they look exactly the same and are just
as buff and do not get very much exercise either. It's the genetics of the breed.

Posted Image

Below when they were puppies.

Posted Image

Edited by missminni, 20 November 2007 - 11:57 PM.





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