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URGENT ALERT from THE FIRST IMMORTAL


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#1 missminni

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 03:13 AM



As most are aware by now, The First Immortal is fighting cancer with both hands tied behind his back.
He has many protocols to try, but no doctor or professional medical assistant to work with on it and that is crucial.
Being in the boondocks of Maine doesn't help the situation. Something as simple as intravenous vitamins is considered heresy by his primary care doctor, Kirk, a oncologist who basically sells chemo and is opposed to any alternative way to deal with cancer. Kirk has already scared off Dr. Jeff, the radiologist who wanted to hook Bill up with another more open minded oncologist. Of course Bill is between a rock and a hard place because
if he dismisses Kirk he will be out of luck when he needs to get in the hospital again, as he had to this week.
You must have an admitting physician.

Now, Kirk is trying to convince Bill to go into hospice and die. He refuses to give him anything but pain meds or chemo, not even permitting him to take resveratrol when he does chemo, and is leaving him no other options, and there are many. MANY! and all Bill wants is a chance to try them. He is not ready to die. NOT READY and he has so much fight left in him, it's a sin to put him in hospice. All he needs is medical assistance. Somebody in the medical profession who can work with him on the many protocols he and so many others at Imminst have researched so thoroughly. Someone who can administer medical procedures like IV's and order medications. Somebody who has the compassion and the
spirit of science that looks for new ways to heal and cure and maybe, in the process, save a very precious life.

If anybody here is that person, or knows that person, please have them get in touch with Bill ASAP. Time is of the essence.
I have a phone number in the hospital where he can be reached tonight and tomorrow. It's the patients lounge where he is most of the time,
since he must remain seated to manage his pain. Laying down is impossible for him now. He's got a plan but he needs help to implement it.
There's a computer there, but he he doesn't get to post as much as he would like to. You can call there anytime and it will ring through and he will answer. I just spoke with him and he said he would be back at the phone around 10:00 and on through the night.
He sounds so strong and has so much fight in him. All he needs is somebody in his corner to help him fight.
He has in no way given up. He is not about to die, and certainly not be forced into it by a narrow minded doctor.
He has everything necessary to beat this cancer, except the medical help to do it.

His number is 207.662.3743.

I know that in this vast intelligent and scientific Imminst community there has to be somebody who can help or knows someone who can. That's why we are reaching out.
ETA~if you can't reach him by phone, please PM him and/or let me know, and post about it, and please keep trying.


Edited by missminni, 07 December 2008 - 04:06 AM.


#2 missminni

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 01:52 PM

I want to let everyone know that Bill is having a very hard time posting, and as much
as he would like to respond, the pain medication he is taking makes it difficult for him to type. It is easier
for him to speak on the phone. Please call him with your concerns and ideas for help. He will welcome your calls.
They will not be an imposition.


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#3 Mike Perry

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 04:14 PM

I want to let everyone know that Bill is having a very hard time posting, and as much
as he would like to respond, the pain medication he is taking makes it difficult for him to type. It is easier
for him to speak on the phone. Please call him with your concerns and ideas for help. He will welcome your calls.
They will not be an imposition.


Like everybody else I hope for the best with the cancer treatment. If the best isn't good enough however we need to think of "plan B"--cryonics, and we need to *have been* thinking about it already and preparing. I need to get in touch with Bill ASAP in regard to this. Some important, additional written authorization is needed from him to expedite any action the Venturists would take on his behalf. (Already he has signed a "declaration of intent" expressing a wish to be cryopreserved but more than just this would help greatly and may make a crucial difference.) I will try to call him (I've tried several times already without success). I will post my phone number here in case he might see it--please if you do, Bill, and I haven't talked to you yet, call me at 480-227-7335. I have sent him email with this number already so he should have it. If anyone else talks to him please let him know that I need to communicate with him too and give him my number. Thanks.

(P.S. I did call 207-662-3743 just now, no answer as before when I've called this number and his "room" number 207-662-7706 [rm 62]; this time I let it ring 25 times.)

Mike Perry

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#4 Mind

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 04:26 PM

If the plan B is needed we might need some help in that regard as well. A successful preservation is not an easy project. The cryo fund has some money (over $13,000) and we need to use it effectively/judiciously in order for it to do some good. Bill might need someone to help plan travel in, around, and out of Maine.

#5 missminni

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 04:55 PM

I want to let everyone know that Bill is having a very hard time posting, and as much
as he would like to respond, the pain medication he is taking makes it difficult for him to type. It is easier
for him to speak on the phone. Please call him with your concerns and ideas for help. He will welcome your calls.
They will not be an imposition.


Like everybody else I hope for the best with the cancer treatment. If the best isn't good enough however we need to think of "plan B"--cryonics, and we need to *have been* thinking about it already and preparing. I need to get in touch with Bill ASAP in regard to this. Some important, additional written authorization is needed from him to expedite any action the Venturists would take on his behalf. (Already he has signed a "declaration of intent" expressing a wish to be cryopreserved but more than just this would help greatly and may make a crucial difference.) I will try to call him (I've tried several times already without success). I will post my phone number here in case he might see it--please if you do, Bill, and I haven't talked to you yet, call me at 480-227-7335. I have sent him email with this number already so he should have it. If anyone else talks to him please let him know that I need to communicate with him too and give him my number. Thanks.

(P.S. I did call 207-662-3743 just now, no answer as before when I've called this number and his "room" number 207-662-7706 [rm 62]; this time I let it ring 25 times.)

Mike Perry

He told me Carol was coming by and they were going to go to the Burlington Coat Factory. He should be back by the phone after 7 PM.


#6 missminni

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 05:14 PM

If the plan B is needed we might need some help in that regard as well. A successful preservation is not an easy project. The cryo fund has some money (over $13,000) and we need to use it effectively/judiciously in order for it to do some good. Bill might need someone to help plan travel in, around, and out of Maine.

I know this is none of my business, and please don't take offense,
but I think it would be more helpful to spend some of that money and effort hiring someone to go to Maine
and help Bill administer vitamin/supplement IV's during his next bout of chemo, which he is going to have.
He can recover with the proper protocol. He has the mindset, and we all know by now that state of mind is
90% of getting well, and he has the arsenal of supplements needed. There's only one thing
missing...professional assistance. This can be arranged the same way that cryonics can be arranged. Some money and
some planning.
If this is about extending life...let's do that. Bill might be in pain,
but he is not ready to give up, not by a long shot. He never even had the opportunity to take the supplements he ordered
due to the inability to digest food because of damage to his GI tract after his last chemo session. By the time his
stomach recovered, the tumor grew and pressed on his espophagus making it impossible to swallow. That situation
has improved slightly but the bone pain is excruciating. A vitamin C drip would help relieve the bone pain and shrink the tumor at the same time.
He has the right Vitamin C. He needs somebody who can administer the drip. Couldn't the same effort needed to co-ordinate
cryonics by used to save his life instead?


#7 tham

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 07:20 PM

I'm uncertain of the status of the funds contributions for
Bill so far.

However, I didn't realize there was a central fund, as mentioned
by David in the "Fighting Cancer" thread, for supplements and
perhaps other complementary therapies.

When I linked Bill to the Maine integrative center about a
month ago, where IV C therapy is available, he replied the
cost was out of his hands.

I'm puzzled why he didn't make use of that fund (or was given
the go-ahead to) at that time ? An initial course of 10
treatments at $175 (as given by Bill earlier) would be $1,750.
I'm don't know the house-call rates in the US, but a request
for a doctor from that center to come over and administer
it now would be at least triple the cost ?

I think his quality of life would be far better now if he had
gone for it then, when he was still in walking shape.

Survival rates with the so-called "gold standard" therapy for
SCLC using cisplatin/carboplatin and etoposide, with or
without radiotherapy, are dismal, and Bill must have known
that.


Since it appears he is now stuck with an oncologist who
is not open to anything else other than drugs, his best
hope would be to request to be started immediately on
amrubicin, or at least topotecan plus imatinib and
zoledronate/MK4.

http://www.imminst.o...showtopic=26202

http://www.imminst.o...o...st&p=281359

Edited by tham, 07 December 2008 - 07:45 PM.


#8 kismet

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 07:40 PM

If the plan B is needed we might need some help in that regard as well. A successful preservation is not an easy project. The cryo fund has some money (over $13,000) and we need to use it effectively/judiciously in order for it to do some good. Bill might need someone to help plan travel in, around, and out of Maine.

I know this is none of my business, and please don't take offense,
but I think it would be more helpful to spend some of that money and effort hiring someone to go to Maine
and help Bill administer vitamin/supplement IV's during his next bout of chemo, which he is going to have.

I know it is none of my business too, but I think it's too late.  On the one hand I'm sure that he needs some supporting drugs/supplements to survive until plan b is ready, but on the other hand it should be something cheap so as not to postpone cryopreservation. IV vit c is potentially cheap, I just don't get why it was impossible to administer it way earlier, the current situation is abysmal and almost out of control.
What is the doctor's prediction, how much time does chemo give us (him)?


He can recover with the proper protocol. He has the mindset, and we all know by now that state of mind is
90% of getting well, and he has the arsenal of supplements needed. There's only one thing
missing...professional assistance. This can be arranged the same way that cryonics can be arranged. Some money and
some planning.
If this is about extending life...let's do that. Bill might be in pain,
but he is not ready to give up, not by a long shot. He never even had the opportunity to take the supplements he ordered
due to the inability to digest food because of damage to his GI tract after his last chemo session. By the time his
stomach recovered, the tumor grew and pressed on his espophagus making it impossible to swallow. That situation
has improved slightly but the bone pain is excruciating. A vitamin C drip would help relieve the bone pain and shrink the tumor at the same time.
He has the right Vitamin C. He needs somebody who can administer the drip. Couldn't the same effort needed to co-ordinate
cryonics by used to save his life instead?

Fighting the cancer to win at this stage is a waste. Fighting until cryopreservation is ready, however, is probably his only chance. We shouldn't bet our money on supplements and drugs, because there's no known cure for SCLC and he could die during this gamble, whereas cryopreservation is a relatively safe bet. We should not be in denial about the situation: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dabda

tham, 1750 for IV vit c treatments? Wow, what a steal, considering vit c is dirt cheap those prices are unfortunately ridiculous, unfair and at least *at this stage* too expensive I believe. I think tfi needs the cheapest treatment that allows for the survival necessary until cryopreservation is ready...

#9 missminni

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 07:46 PM

I'm uncertain of the status of the funds contributions for
Bill so far.

However, I didn't realize there was a central fund, as mentioned
by David in the "Fighting Cancer" thread, for supplements and
perhaps other complementary therapies.

When I linked Bill to the Maine integrative center about a
month ago, where IV C therapy is available, he replied the
cost was out of his hands.

I'm puzzled why he didn't make use of that fund (or was given
the go-ahead to) at that time ? An initial course of 10
treatments at $175 (as given by Bill earlier) would be $1,750.
I'm don't know the house-call rates in the US, but a request
for a doctor from that center to come over and administer
it now would be at least triple the cost ?


I think his quality of life would be far better now if he had
gone for it then, when he was still in walking shape.

Survival rates with the called "gold standard" therapy for
SCLC using cisplatin/carboplatin and etoposide, with or
without radiotherapy, are dismal, and Bill must have known
that.


Since it appears he is now stuck with an oncologist who
is not open to anything else other than drugs, his best
hope would be to request to be started immediately on
amrubicin, or at least topotecan plus imatinib and
zoledronate.

http://www.imminst.o...showtopic=26202

http://www.imminst.o...o...st&p=281359

as to the vit C
I believe he said that they didn't use the right Vitamin C.

also to Mike Perry about the phone situation...Bill is unable to call out and he doesn't have Carol cel phone with him.

Edited by missminni, 07 December 2008 - 07:48 PM.


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#10 missminni

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 07:53 PM

If the plan B is needed we might need some help in that regard as well. A successful preservation is not an easy project. The cryo fund has some money (over $13,000) and we need to use it effectively/judiciously in order for it to do some good. Bill might need someone to help plan travel in, around, and out of Maine.

I know this is none of my business, and please don't take offense,
but I think it would be more helpful to spend some of that money and effort hiring someone to go to Maine
and help Bill administer vitamin/supplement IV's during his next bout of chemo, which he is going to have.

I know it is none of my business too, but I think it's too late. On the one hand I'm sure that he needs some supporting drugs/supplements to survive until plan b is ready, but on the other hand it should be something cheap so as not to postpone cryopreservation. IV vit c is potentially cheap, I just don't get why it was impossible to administer it way earlier, the current situation is abysmal and almost out of control.
What is the doctor's prediction, how much time does chemo give us (him)?


He can recover with the proper protocol. He has the mindset, and we all know by now that state of mind is
90% of getting well, and he has the arsenal of supplements needed. There's only one thing
missing...professional assistance. This can be arranged the same way that cryonics can be arranged. Some money and
some planning.
If this is about extending life...let's do that. Bill might be in pain,
but he is not ready to give up, not by a long shot. He never even had the opportunity to take the supplements he ordered
due to the inability to digest food because of damage to his GI tract after his last chemo session. By the time his
stomach recovered, the tumor grew and pressed on his espophagus making it impossible to swallow. That situation
has improved slightly but the bone pain is excruciating. A vitamin C drip would help relieve the bone pain and shrink the tumor at the same time.
He has the right Vitamin C. He needs somebody who can administer the drip. Couldn't the same effort needed to co-ordinate
cryonics by used to save his life instead?

Fighting the cancer to win at this stage is a waste. Fighting until cryopreservation is ready, however, is probably his only chance. We shouldn't bet our money on supplements and drugs, because there's no known cure for SCLC and he could die during this gamble, whereas cryopreservation is a relatively safe bet. We should not be in denial about the situation: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dabda

tham, 1750 for IV vit c treatments? Wow, what a steal, considering vit c is dirt cheap those prices are unfortunately ridiculous, unfair and at least *at this stage* too expensive I believe. I think tfi needs the cheapest treatment that allows for the survival necessary until cryopreservation is ready...

He has the vitamin C. The doctor he has won't administer it. Nobody will. He's tried all along. A couple of nurses were going to do it and then backed out of it because they wouldn't do it without doctors orders.
I have a question. Have they ever brought back a cryopreserved person?
I also don't agree with you about it being too late. It's never too late. I've seen people survive when no doctor thought they would.
The will to live can make miracles happen. And one thing Bill has is the will.

Edited by missminni, 07 December 2008 - 07:57 PM.


#11 Ringostarr

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 07:59 PM

If it were me, I would FOCUS on a Resveratrol drip. SIRT activation IS the key to all of this.
Plus putting resveratrol directly into his bloodstream circumvents any bioavailabity issues.


I'm uncertain of the status of the funds contributions for
Bill so far.

However, I didn't realize there was a central fund, as mentioned
by David in the "Fighting Cancer" thread, for supplements and
perhaps other complementary therapies.

When I linked Bill to the Maine integrative center about a
month ago, where IV C therapy is available, he replied the
cost was out of his hands.

I'm puzzled why he didn't make use of that fund (or was given
the go-ahead to) at that time ? An initial course of 10
treatments at $175 (as given by Bill earlier) would be $1,750.
I'm don't know the house-call rates in the US, but a request
for a doctor from that center to come over and administer
it now would be at least triple the cost ?


I think his quality of life would be far better now if he had
gone for it then, when he was still in walking shape.

Survival rates with the called "gold standard" therapy for
SCLC using cisplatin/carboplatin and etoposide, with or
without radiotherapy, are dismal, and Bill must have known
that.


Since it appears he is now stuck with an oncologist who
is not open to anything else other than drugs, his best
hope would be to request to be started immediately on
amrubicin, or at least topotecan plus imatinib and
zoledronate.

http://www.imminst.o...showtopic=26202

http://www.imminst.o...o...st&p=281359

as to the vit C
I believe he said that they didn't use the right Vitamin C.

also to Mike Perry about the phone situation...Bill is unable to call out and he doesn't have Carol cel phone with him.



#12 tham

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 08:00 PM

Er .... the "right" vitamin C ?

Isn't any form of ascorbate still vitamin C, as long at
it does the job of cytotoxicty ? Why didn't Bill go for it ?

The doctors from that Maine center must have been
experienced in this form of treatment.

The end result is now he hasn't even got a single gram
in him to date.

#13 missminni

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 08:08 PM

Er .... the "right" vitamin C ?

Isn't any form of ascorbate still vitamin C, as long at
it does the job of cytotoxicty ? Why didn't Bill go for it ?

The doctors from that Maine center must have been
experienced in this form of treatment.

The end result is now he hasn't even got a single gram
in him to date.


The C they were using had something added to it that would close down his veins..and he already has
a problem in that area.

Edited by missminni, 08 December 2008 - 03:49 AM.


#14 missminni

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 08:11 PM

Kismet,
Re: Your point about inexpensive therapy now to prolong his life until cryonics is ready....
Since he already has the Vit. C, all he needs is someone able to give him the IV.
That might be a very cost efficient method of prolonging his life.
Maybe the cryonics people could find somebody to do that for him as part of
their program. Is that a possibility?


#15 missminni

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 08:26 PM

If it were me, I would FOCUS on a Resveratrol drip. SIRT activation IS the key to all of this.
Plus putting resveratrol directly into his bloodstream circumvents any bioavailabity issues.


Yes I agree. Res is the only thing he's been able to take (by holding it in his mouth)
since his last chemo round in Sept. He claims it's the reason he has survived this long since it is the ONLY supp he
has been able to use. Unfortunately, he doesn't have it with him in hospital. I think Carol was going to bring it to him today.
If not, he is planning on going home tomorrow and starting it again.
I've read that for lung cancer, the best method is to inject it in the diaphagm (I think) I'm going to
double check that, but I believe I read that.
ETA~
I haven't found the original study I was looking for, but I came across this...I'm still looking for the other one.

Resveratrol given orally also had no effect on leukemia and lung cancer;[15][20] however, injected intraperitoneally, 2.5 or 10 mg/kg of resveratrol slowed the growth of metastatic Lewis lung carcinomas in mice.[15][21] Resveratrol (1 mg/kg orally) reduced the number and size of the esophageal tumors in rats treated with a carcinogen.[22] In several studies, small doses (0.02-8 mg/kg) of resveratrol, given prophylactically, reduced or prevented the development of intestinal and colon tumors in rats given different carcinogens.[15]

Edited by missminni, 07 December 2008 - 08:47 PM.


#16 Ringostarr

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 08:29 PM

Hard to believe you guys are talking about vitiman C at this point. While it may help the situation (and I Hope it does), I think it is time to 'step it up' a notch. I hate to pound on the same drum over and over but I am thinking large intraveneous does of resveratrol are his BEST shot - maybe Anthony can help with a formulation? It's late in the 4th quarter and the time is now. God Bless.


Kismet,
Re: Your point about inexpensive therapy now to prolong his life until cryonics is ready....
Since he already has the Vit. C, all he needs is someone able to give him the IV.
That might be a very cost efficient method of prolonging his life.
Maybe the cryonics people could find somebody to do that for him as part of
their program. Is that a possibility?



#17 forever freedom

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 09:18 PM

I know it is none of my business too, but I think it's too late.  On the one hand I'm sure that he needs some supporting drugs/supplements to survive until plan b is ready, but on the other hand it should be something cheap so as not to postpone cryopreservation. IV vit c is potentially cheap, I just don't get why it was impossible to administer it way earlier, the current situation is abysmal and almost out of control.
What is the doctor's prediction, how much time does chemo give us (him)?


I agree with kismet, the focus should be on maintaining bill alive for as long as possible until cryo preservation is ready.


He has the mindset, and we all know by now that state of mind is
90% of getting well


Unfortunately, that's not so (attitude doesn't affect cancer survival). As i said before, in my humble opinion, i think it's better to make cryonics the absolute priority now (while of course keeping bill alive until cryo is ready).

Edited by sam988, 07 December 2008 - 09:19 PM.


#18 missminni

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 09:25 PM

I know it is none of my business too, but I think it's too late. On the one hand I'm sure that he needs some supporting drugs/supplements to survive until plan b is ready, but on the other hand it should be something cheap so as not to postpone cryopreservation. IV vit c is potentially cheap, I just don't get why it was impossible to administer it way earlier, the current situation is abysmal and almost out of control.
What is the doctor's prediction, how much time does chemo give us (him)?


I agree with kismet, the focus should be on maintaining bill alive for as long as possible until cryo preservation is ready.


He has the mindset, and we all know by now that state of mind is
90% of getting well


Unfortunately, that's not so (attitude doesn't affect cancer survival). As i said before, in my humble opinion, i think it's better to make cryonics the absolute priority now (while of course keeping bill alive until cryo is ready).

I wasn't talking about optimism. I was talking about the will to live. Very different.
Attitude - The Will to LiveErnest H. Rosenbaum, MD, and Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA

How often do you use the expression the will to live? Does it have any meaning? Can it prolong your life? Can it bolster your immune system? In our oncology practice, we can unequivocally affirm that the expression does have meaning and that it can vastly improve the quality of life and may even prolong the life of a cancer survivor. However, it will be many years before we know the answer to the third question.

As medical professionals, we have always been fascinated by the power of the will to live. Like all creatures in the animal world, human beings have a fierce instinct for survival. The will to live is a force within all of us to fight for survival when our lives are threatened by a disease such as cancer. Yet this force is stronger in some people than in others..

Sometimes the biology of a cancer will dictate the course of events regardless of the patient's attitude and fighting spirit. These events are often beyond our control. But patients with positive attitudes are better able to cope with disease-related problems and may respond better to therapy. Many physicians have seen how two patients of similar ages and with the same diagnosis, degree of illness and treatment program experience vastly different results. One of the few apparent differences was that one patient was pessimistic and the other optimistic.

We have known for over 2,000 years--from the writings of Plato and Galen--that there is a direct correlation between the mind, the body and one's health. "The cure of many diseases is unknown to physicians,'' Plato concluded, "because they are ignorant of the whole. For the part can never be well unless the whole is well.''


Edited by missminni, 07 December 2008 - 09:31 PM.


#19 thefirstimmortal

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 10:17 PM

POSTED UNDER THE THREAT OF CENSORSHIP

also to Mike Perry about the phone situation...Bill is unable to call out and he doesn't have Carol cel phone with him. [/font][/size]


I'm going to go drum out a phone card here someplace, make a bath pit stop, and I'm working on an important Pizer-Perry post. MissMinni, I missed a few things in our review of the first post you went over with me. We can try to review that later tonight after the P2Post.

#20 kismet

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 10:46 PM

I have a question. Have they ever brought back a cryopreserved person?

On the other hand, did they ever cure highly advanced and metastasised SCLC? That is exceedingly rare. And at what cost? Highly decreased life span, neurological damage (chemo brain) likely, relapses, secondary malignancies very likely (up to 20%). And it's a painful gamble at that.
" Extensive-stage disease, performance status (PS) more than 2, liver and bone marrow metastases, and elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and alkaline phosphatase levels were all negative prognostic factors."  Most of his prognostic factors are negative, aren't they? Even if they were not, 5-10 year survival is 1-2%, bought with high dose chemo and the above mentioned side-effects ^.

I would have given supps, drugs & co the benefit of the doubt if effective treatment was started earlier, but apperently this was not possible (expensive treatment, doctors are asses who want us dead and won't even give IV vit c).

Ringostarr, unfortunately vit c is one of the best and most promising things that we can do, at least when we consider side-effects and price.

#21 missminni

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 11:01 PM

I have a question. Have they ever brought back a cryopreserved person?

On the other hand, did they ever cure highly advanced and metastasised SCLC? That is exceedingly rare. And at what cost? Highly decreased life span, neurological damage (chemo brain) likely, relapses, secondary malignancies very likely (up to 20%). And it's a painful gamble at that.
" Extensive-stage disease, performance status (PS) more than 2, liver and bone marrow metastases, and elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and alkaline phosphatase levels were all negative prognostic factors." Most of his prognostic factors are negative, aren't they? Even if they were not, 5-10 year survival is 1-2%, bought with high dose chemo and the above mentioned side-effects ^.

I would have given supps, drugs & co the benefit of the doubt if effective treatment was started earlier, but apperently this was not possible (expensive treatment, doctors are asses who want us dead and won't even give IV vit c).

Ringostarr, unfortunately vit c is one of the best and most promising things that we can do, at least when we consider side-effects and price.

I wasn't being faceatious when I asked that question. I take it the answer is no.
Vitamin C is certainly cost effective, if it can be administered. That's the caveat. Maybe that can be arranged for by cryonics.

Edited by missminni, 07 December 2008 - 11:06 PM.


#22 Lotus

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Posted 08 December 2008 - 12:07 AM

Perhaps we could write in the message field when sending a PayPal donation, that the money sent can be used for bringing a doctor there, if TFI wants to? I really don't know how to get a doctor or nurse there, but it should be possible to find one, maybe in the hospital or in the area? I don't understand why they wouldn't do it. I don't mind my small donations being used for either cryo or this, maybe others think the same.

Edited by Lotus, 08 December 2008 - 12:11 AM.


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#23 Mike Perry

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Posted 08 December 2008 - 12:12 AM

I was able to call and talk to Bill today. He is trying to work out the issue at hand, to provide written authorization for action by the Society for Venturism to get him cryopreserved should the need arise.

#24 missminni

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Posted 08 December 2008 - 12:44 AM

Perhaps we could write in the message field when sending a PayPal donation, that the money sent can be used for bringing a doctor there, if TFI wants to? I really don't know how to get a doctor or nurse there, but it should be possible to find one, maybe in the hospital or in the area? I don't understand why they wouldn't do it. I don't mind my small donations being used for either cryo or this, maybe others think the same.

Thanks Lotus.
The local nurses will not do it without a doctors supervision. And his doctor doesn't approve of any supplementing.
It's barbaric.


#25 kismet

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Posted 08 December 2008 - 12:55 AM

I wasn't being faceatious when I asked that question. I take it the answer is no.
Vitamin C is certainly cost effective, if it can be administered. That's the caveat. Maybe that can be arranged for by cryonics.

I did not answer, I thought we all know what the most likely answer would be (no), having no clue about current advances in cryopreservation I can't even give you a meaningful answer, but generally I tend to believe in the concept and would certainly opt for cryo as plan B in his place. Just wanted to emphasise that neither option is perfectly safe nor comfortable.
Can't someone simply replace the IV drip he has with the correct vit c solution, this task does not even need any medical expertise. I know there are some risks involved, but still someone needs to do it. I don't even know what the f*ck is going on with his oncologist(s)? If he is really refused a potentially life saving therapy, that is bordering on murder. Even though SCLC often may be quite susceptible to chemo, it won't do much good as a stand-alone therapy I guess...

Edited by kismet, 08 December 2008 - 12:57 AM.


#26 missminni

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Posted 08 December 2008 - 01:43 AM

I wasn't being faceatious when I asked that question. I take it the answer is no.
Vitamin C is certainly cost effective, if it can be administered. That's the caveat. Maybe that can be arranged for by cryonics.

I did not answer, I thought we all know what the most likely answer would be (no), having no clue about current advances in cryopreservation I can't even give you a meaningful answer, but generally I tend to believe in the concept and would certainly opt for cryo as plan B in his place. Just wanted to emphasise that neither option is perfectly safe nor comfortable.
Can't someone simply replace the IV drip he has with the correct vit c solution, this task does not even need any medical expertise. I know there are some risks involved, but still someone needs to do it. I don't even know what the f*ck is going on with his oncologist(s)? If he is really refused a potentially life saving therapy, that is bordering on murder. Even though SCLC often may be quite susceptible to chemo, it won't do much good as a stand-alone therapy I guess...

Exactly and Bill is not in a position to challenge him and be left without a primary care doctor,
and no medical assistant or nurse local to that area will do it without his orders. Hard to believe, but the truth. Bill is between
a rock and a hard place.


#27 bacopa

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Posted 08 December 2008 - 02:52 AM

Why is his doctor being such a narrow minded ass? And why can't he find another doctor?

#28 missminni

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Posted 08 December 2008 - 03:12 AM

Why is his doctor being such a narrow minded ass? And why can't he find another doctor?

Why his doctor is such an ass is because he has a huge chemotherapy business and
refuses to consider any protocol but chemo. He also has a huge ego to go along with his huge business.
Bill lives in a one horse town called Acton Maine and he doesn't have the funds
or ability to hunt for another doctor since that would have to be in Portland. There are none in Acton. Protland is 60 miles away.
He actually found one a few weeks ago. A compassionate radiologist who wanted to connect him to a more progressive oncologist,
but his present doctor scared him off. This is no joke. He needs a CNA or para medic who can work with him.


#29 Shannon Vyff

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Posted 08 December 2008 - 06:33 AM

Can Carol post here to help us, help William?

Thank you Missminni for all of this, is your communication stable (meaning easy, or able to be accessed if William goes through a worse spell)?

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#30 Lufega

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Posted 08 December 2008 - 07:11 AM

I have read many anecdotal reports that Graviola works wonders with lung cancer. It might be too late in the game for me to suggest something but it sticks out to me like a sore thumb.

...and heck, why not breathe in Diamond V XPC powder?? That's how it helped the factory workers where it was discovered and someone here on the forum said it helped with Basal cell carcinoma.

Edited by Lufega, 08 December 2008 - 07:13 AM.





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