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Resveratrol: Current State of Science?


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#61 2tender

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Posted 09 April 2010 - 03:20 PM

Just upped the dose from 350 mg to 750 mg two days ago. First noticeable effects were dry mouth and mild tachycardia (my pulse went from mid 70's to mid 80's). Also, my sleep was more disturbed last two days (I take it at night). I can't pinpoint these to resveratrol 100% but timing of the syptoms coincide.
I think this goes to show that resveratrol dosage increase, even when modest, does create noticeable differences; which gives a hint on how powerful effects it can have on the body. Maybe my body is warning me to be careful.
With other supplements I use, such as silymarin, choline, burdock root, ellagic acid, etc., I've experienced no noticeable changes even when I tripled the amounts.
I think I'll step down to 500 mg and see what happens. I believe everyone has an "ideal" dosage, and I'm trying to find mine.

,
I am now taking 15 grams of Resveratrol in an emulsion of coconut oil, grapefruit juice, Bioperine, sodium ascorbate, aspirin, Vitamin E and 12.5 grams Curcumin which has been processed long and hard enough to form nano-drops of oil in the emusions, based on patents I've read. 20 minutes before taking the emulsion I take 10 mg. Bioperine and two adult aspirins with grapefruit juice. I take another aspirin and another Bioperine with the emulsion. I had some real problems with Quercetin and Resveratrol but since I dropped off the Quercetin, I'm having nothing but good effects from what should be highly available Resveratrol and Curcumin. I sleep like a teenager, I feel very good, my mood is excellent. My prostate cancer, which appears to have been slowly growing in me for 10-14 years and giving me very painful symptoms all during that time, is now asymptomatic. In a few days I up the amount of Resveratrol to 20 grams.

Oh yes. I'm also using Resveratrol buccally from arising to Noon. I'm waiting for my Resveratrol lozenges to arrive in a week. I know the power of buccal delivery of Resveratrol and having lozenges to suck on instead of just coating my cheeks and gums with Resveratrol is exciting.

With me, it appears the more you take, the less side effects. Or, I've habituated to the effects of the Resveratrol.


I am glad that removing quercetin from your regimen eliminated your adverse symptoms.

Twenty grams of resveratrol approaches voodoo black magic. The most I've heard of someone taking (other than an acute dose,) is 7 grams a day. There was a rodent study that showed kidney lesions appearing at a dose that might be the human equivalent of 15 grams a day, but it took three times as much before any deaths were noted. You are entering uncharted territory. Do be careful my friend.



Agreed here, approaching an ounce daily of any concentrated supplement like Resveratrol, for a prolonged period may contradict the intended effect. If this does work for you, and I think it will, provided you know when to decrease dosage, please document and verify its success.

#62 2tender

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Posted 09 April 2010 - 03:51 PM

Maybe this is worth a new topic, but here goes:
I'm working around an idea which I wanted to share with you for opinions. We all know the numerous health claims of wine despite the virtual non-bioavailability of resveratrol and other plant compounds in it. Hence, many believe that the health benefits of wine come from the strong synergistic and compounding effect of phenols and plant components in it. So far, this is basic info.
I wrote this idea before briefly, but this makes me think that rather than taking resv alone, why not combine it with the main flavanoids and non-flavanoids found in wine such as quercetin, rutin, lutein, anthocyanins, catechins and acetic acid (main acid source). All of these are sold individually as extracts (and the last one is vinegar). So having a combination of these extracts, one would be basically drinking hundreds of bottles worth of of wine concentrate with nil alcohol content, rather than just one component. I may add a glass of wine or two with it just in case to fortify the effects and add some ethanol.
Does this sound far off or am I on to something? Opinions welcome...



I had the same thoughts and had tried the wine extracts with combinations of the various supplements you mention. The problem was they didnt seem to mix well with my physiology. I think there are flavinoid combination supplements available similar to what you describe from LEF. Everyone that supplements seriously has their own regimen based on what seems to work for them. I think the problem is allergic responses with flavanoids some people cant tolerate them. If everything worked equally as well, for everybody, we would know what to take. There is a physiologic response variable for everyone, whether its supplements or medications.

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#63 maxwatt

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Posted 09 April 2010 - 04:55 PM

Maybe this is worth a new topic, but here goes:
I'm working around an idea which I wanted to share with you for opinions. We all know the numerous health claims of wine despite the virtual non-bioavailability of resveratrol and other plant compounds in it. Hence, many believe that the health benefits of wine come from the strong synergistic and compounding effect of phenols and plant components in it. So far, this is basic info.
I wrote this idea before briefly, but this makes me think that rather than taking resv alone, why not combine it with the main flavanoids and non-flavanoids found in wine such as quercetin, rutin, lutein, anthocyanins, catechins and acetic acid (main acid source). All of these are sold individually as extracts (and the last one is vinegar). So having a combination of these extracts, one would be basically drinking hundreds of bottles worth of of wine concentrate with nil alcohol content, rather than just one component. I may add a glass of wine or two with it just in case to fortify the effects and add some ethanol.
Does this sound far off or am I on to something? Opinions welcome...



I had the same thoughts and had tried the wine extracts with combinations of the various supplements you mention. The problem was they didnt seem to mix well with my physiology. I think there are flavinoid combination supplements available similar to what you describe from LEF. Everyone that supplements seriously has their own regimen based on what seems to work for them. I think the problem is allergic responses with flavanoids some people cant tolerate them. If everything worked equally as well, for everybody, we would know what to take. There is a physiologic response variable for everyone, whether its supplements or medications.


What 2tender said is spot on. I just want to add in support the observation that several posters here have stated that taking quercetin with resveratrol results in joint pain that is resolved on ditching the quercetin. YMMV.

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#64 joe57777

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Posted 12 April 2010 - 03:21 AM

Maybe this is worth a new topic, but here goes:
I'm working around an idea which I wanted to share with you for opinions. We all know the numerous health claims of wine despite the virtual non-bioavailability of resveratrol and other plant compounds in it. Hence, many believe that the health benefits of wine come from the strong synergistic and compounding effect of phenols and plant components in it. So far, this is basic info.
I wrote this idea before briefly, but this makes me think that rather than taking resv alone, why not combine it with the main flavanoids and non-flavanoids found in wine such as quercetin, rutin, lutein, anthocyanins, catechins and acetic acid (main acid source). All of these are sold individually as extracts (and the last one is vinegar). So having a combination of these extracts, one would be basically drinking hundreds of bottles worth of of wine concentrate with nil alcohol content, rather than just one component. I may add a glass of wine or two with it just in case to fortify the effects and add some ethanol.
Does this sound far off or am I on to something? Opinions welcome...



I had the same thoughts and had tried the wine extracts with combinations of the various supplements you mention. The problem was they didnt seem to mix well with my physiology. I think there are flavinoid combination supplements available similar to what you describe from LEF. Everyone that supplements seriously has their own regimen based on what seems to work for them. I think the problem is allergic responses with flavanoids some people cant tolerate them. If everything worked equally as well, for everybody, we would know what to take. There is a physiologic response variable for everyone, whether its supplements or medications.


What 2tender said is spot on. I just want to add in support the observation that several posters here have stated that taking quercetin with resveratrol results in joint pain that is resolved on ditching the quercetin. YMMV.


Max, If that is the case, then why would bsardi include Quercetin in his Longe****x formula? Would you not think that if someone, for example, has a product and then learn that a majority of people are experiencing an adverse effect from one particular ingredient in your product that you would want to eliminate that "bad" ingredient "immediately if not sooner" if you want to be able to continue to sell your product? Therefore, if bsardi felt that Quercetin with Resveratrol was a "big problem", would you think he would not eliminate Quercetin? I would myself think so. In addition, if I might inquire, out of all the people that have reported "joint pain" or any other problem(s) they may have experienced with Quercetin and Resveratrol, how do we know that there are Not many more multiples of people that have not had any problems at all with Quercetin and Resveratrol.

I am not promoting Longe****x, I am just trying to be realistic in my research to come to a conclusion of which regimen of resveratrol might make sense for me as a starting point based on my research from comments I read from the people in this forum. And, maybe we should hear from people taking Longe****x that contains Quercetin and Resveratrol and see if the majority (or if anyone) has trouble with joint pain before we give a random reader of this thread the impression that Quercetin and Resveratrol most always causes "joint pain". In fact, I have read in this very forum that Quercetin is helpful with Resveratrol to help maintain obsorbtion after it passes through the liver. In addition, there are plenty of people that were saying that they take powder resveratrol and a separate dosage of Quercetin with it. Therefore, can we have some of the people that take both Quercetin and Resveratrol together along with people that take Longe****x comment on this "joint pain" before we condemn Quercetin?

Thank you.

#65 niner

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Posted 12 April 2010 - 04:15 AM

What 2tender said is spot on. I just want to add in support the observation that several posters here have stated that taking quercetin with resveratrol results in joint pain that is resolved on ditching the quercetin. YMMV.

Max, If that is the case, then why would bsardi include Quercetin in his Longe****x formula? Would you not think that if someone, for example, has a product and then learn that a majority of people are experiencing an adverse effect from one particular ingredient in your product that you would want to eliminate that "bad" ingredient "immediately if not sooner" if you want to be able to continue to sell your product? Therefore, if bsardi felt that Quercetin with Resveratrol was a "big problem", would you think he would not eliminate Quercetin? I would myself think so. In addition, if I might inquire, out of all the people that have reported "joint pain" or any other problem(s) they may have experienced with Quercetin and Resveratrol, how do we know that there are Not many more multiples of people that have not had any problems at all with Quercetin and Resveratrol.

I am not promoting Longe****x, I am just trying to be realistic in my research to come to a conclusion of which regimen of resveratrol might make sense for me as a starting point based on my research from comments I read from the people in this forum. And, maybe we should hear from people taking Longe****x that contains Quercetin and Resveratrol and see if the majority (or if anyone) has trouble with joint pain before we give a random reader of this thread the impression that Quercetin and Resveratrol most always causes "joint pain". In fact, I have read in this very forum that Quercetin is helpful with Resveratrol to help maintain obsorbtion after it passes through the liver. In addition, there are plenty of people that were saying that they take powder resveratrol and a separate dosage of Quercetin with it. Therefore, can we have some of the people that take both Quercetin and Resveratrol together along with people that take Longe****x comment on this "joint pain" before we condemn Quercetin?

It's not condemning a compound if you note an adverse event with it. There are lots of pharmaceuticals on the market that have rare side effects, some of which are extremely serious. I'm alive today because of a quinolone antibiotic, but that same compound has injured a number of people, some of them very seriously. It caries a black-box warning, the FDA's strongest warning, because of this fact, though it is still marketed because the side effects are rare and the drug is extremely useful, in some cases essential. I would be surprised if Sardi is not aware of the joint pain reports. The involvement of quercetin in these adverse events is a relatively new report, and to date represents a minority of the joint/tendon pain reports. Because the dose of all compounds in the various Longe*x formulations is so low, I suspect that there have been few adverse events with it. If they have happened, they probably were not reported. We have also seen reports that vitamin D counteracts the joint/tendon problem. Perhaps that's why Sardi uses it, or maybe it's just there because it's a good idea in general.

#66 Anthony_Loera

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Posted 12 April 2010 - 02:50 PM

Joe,

why do you assume sardi who is somewhat a freelance journalist by trade, is more knowledgeable than folks here about compounds? More knowledgeable than even yourself?

Edited by Anthony_Loera, 12 April 2010 - 02:53 PM.


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#67 mikeinnaples

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Posted 12 April 2010 - 03:26 PM

I am not promoting Longe****x, I am just trying to be realistic in my research to come to a conclusion of which regimen of resveratrol might make sense for me as a starting point based on my research from comments I read from the people in this forum. And, maybe we should hear from people taking Longe****x that contains Quercetin and Resveratrol and see if the majority (or if anyone) has trouble with joint pain before we give a random reader of this thread the impression that Quercetin and Resveratrol most always causes "joint pain". In fact, I have read in this very forum that Quercetin is helpful with Resveratrol to help maintain obsorbtion after it passes through the liver. In addition, there are plenty of people that were saying that they take powder resveratrol and a separate dosage of Quercetin with it. Therefore, can we have some of the people that take both Quercetin and Resveratrol together along with people that take Longe****x comment on this "joint pain" before we condemn Quercetin?

Thank you.



I take Quercetin and Resveratrol together, both at dosages way higher than in the product you mentioned with no issues. I do not use the the product you mentioned though because it is overpriced and sold by a company that has an extremely bad reputation for shadey business practices and marketing, not to mention Sardi himself is a douche.

#68 Ironman-Adam

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Posted 12 April 2010 - 08:23 PM

Anecdotally, I began taking a low dose of Resveratrol with Quercetin, and experienced no ill effects. I then moved to a higher dose of better quality Resveratrol, but coincidentally without the Quercetin. I began to suffer unusual joint, tendon, and muscle pain. I was hardly supplementing with D3 at all (a small dose once every few days) so increased to a significant daily dose - et voila, no more problem.

I now take a substantial split dose of Resveratrol with Quercetin, and I also supplement heavily with D3 - with no adverse effects at all (in fact, quite the reverse...)

So I'd suggest that, in my case at least, issues with sensitivity to Resveratrol seem to be D3 deficiency related, rather than anything to do with Quercetin.

#69 maxwatt

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Posted 12 April 2010 - 08:58 PM

Anecdotally, I began taking a low dose of Resveratrol with Quercetin, and experienced no ill effects. I then moved to a higher dose of better quality Resveratrol, but coincidentally without the Quercetin. I began to suffer unusual joint, tendon, and muscle pain. I was hardly supplementing with D3 at all (a small dose once every few days) so increased to a significant daily dose - et voila, no more problem.

I now take a substantial split dose of Resveratrol with Quercetin, and I also supplement heavily with D3 - with no adverse effects at all (in fact, quite the reverse...)

So I'd suggest that, in my case at least, issues with sensitivity to Resveratrol seem to be D3 deficiency related, rather than anything to do with Quercetin.


If (has been theorized and as one contributor has shown with blood serum-level testing in volunteers) quercetin increases the serum level of resveratrol, then the joint pain is an artifact of jhigher resveratrol doses, combined with a D3 deficiency.

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#70 joe57777

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Posted 18 April 2010 - 03:47 AM

I am not promoting Longe****x, I am just trying to be realistic in my research to come to a conclusion of which regimen of resveratrol might make sense for me as a starting point based on my research from comments I read from the people in this forum. And, maybe we should hear from people taking Longe****x that contains Quercetin and Resveratrol and see if the majority (or if anyone) has trouble with joint pain before we give a random reader of this thread the impression that Quercetin and Resveratrol most always causes "joint pain". In fact, I have read in this very forum that Quercetin is helpful with Resveratrol to help maintain obsorbtion after it passes through the liver. In addition, there are plenty of people that were saying that they take powder resveratrol and a separate dosage of Quercetin with it. Therefore, can we have some of the people that take both Quercetin and Resveratrol together along with people that take Longe****x comment on this "joint pain" before we condemn Quercetin?

Thank you.



I take Quercetin and Resveratrol together, both at dosages way higher than in the product you mentioned with no issues. I do not use the the product you mentioned though because it is overpriced and sold by a company that has an extremely bad reputation for shadey business practices and marketing, not to mention Sardi himself is a douche.


I respect your opinion Mike. But what do you or anybody else think of Perfect-ResGrape brand of Resveratrol supplement? It claims to contain NO fillers or binders and it's label explains the exact amount of every substance it contains. Whereas (for example) Longe****x's advantage+ formula has several ingredients that do not list their amounts. Also both of the Longe****x formulas do use fillers and or binders. The only potential downside to the ResGrape formula is that it is not "micronized". Would this mean that the 99% resveratrol claimed to be in the capsule is not accurate? However, if it is 99% Trans-resveratrol, then I could just add D3 separately along with just a choice few other supplements. The difficult thing about taking all of these different supplements is that some do about the same as others. Example, many claim to be anti-oxidants. How many anti-oxidants does one need in their body at once? If we are not careful with these supplements, are we doubling or tripling our efforts which is either giving us too much of one thing or at least wasting our money? Example, why buy 2 furnaces or 2 water-heaters for your smaller home when just 1 furnace or 1 water-heater is all you really need to get the job done. See my point?

Anyway, I am still trying to find the best Resveratrol brand formula. Also, what does anyone think about Whey Peptide Protein is it really that good for you and does it really help burn fat while keeping lean muscle?

Thanks in advance!
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#71 2tender

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Posted 18 April 2010 - 04:14 AM

I appreciate your posts to prompt discourse, but bolding a products name, twice in this forum may be borderline spamming. Most Resveratrol consumers here only use one source. They dont want this forum to become an overt advertisement. Hundreds of accounts have been deleted because of this stipulation. Personally, I dont and wouldnt use the products you mention.

#72 joe57777

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Posted 18 April 2010 - 04:22 AM

I appreciate your posts to prompt discourse, but bolding a products name, twice in this forum may be borderline spamming. Most Resveratrol consumers here only use one source. They dont want this forum to become an overt advertisement. Hundreds of accounts have been deleted because of this stipulation. Personally, I dont and wouldnt use the products you mention.


I am sorry for mentioning names, but I am just trying to justify what I research. I thought since this forum is for helping people do this, there would not be a problem to gather some comparisons. Am I in the wrong online forum? Also, I respect that you would not take the products I mentioned. However, you did not tell me why that would not take them.

Thanks

#73 niner

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Posted 18 April 2010 - 05:02 AM

I appreciate your posts to prompt discourse, but bolding a products name, twice in this forum may be borderline spamming. Most Resveratrol consumers here only use one source. They dont want this forum to become an overt advertisement. Hundreds of accounts have been deleted because of this stipulation. Personally, I dont and wouldnt use the products you mention.

I am sorry for mentioning names, but I am just trying to justify what I research. I thought since this forum is for helping people do this, there would not be a problem to gather some comparisons. Am I in the wrong online forum? Also, I respect that you would not take the products I mentioned. However, you did not tell me why that would not take them.

Mentioning a name isn't a problem, although once would be better than repeating posts. Without a link to their Supplement Facts sheet, I can't really evaluate Perfect Res Grape. I definitely prefer high purity resveratrol products; 98% or better. I would want to have some assurance that the product is clean, that the vendor tests every batch of raw materials, and that I could trust the vendor. Micronization is certainly a plus. In addition, I'd like it to be in suspended in a delivery agent, but those things cost money.

These guys claim they have no "fillers" or "binders", but I doubt that anyone else has fillers or binders either. Binders would only be used in a tablet, and everyone uses capsules. There isn't really any need for fillers given the amount of resveratrol in a dose. Did they say anything about agents used to ensure reliable capping? (Flow agents, anti-caking agents, lubricants?) I bet they aren't much different than anyone else in that regard. If they have a good price per gram and you want to roll the dice on purity, you could try them out. Personally, I would go with a company that was better known.

#74 joe57777

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Posted 18 April 2010 - 11:22 AM

I appreciate your posts to prompt discourse, but bolding a products name, twice in this forum may be borderline spamming. Most Resveratrol consumers here only use one source. They dont want this forum to become an overt advertisement. Hundreds of accounts have been deleted because of this stipulation. Personally, I dont and wouldnt use the products you mention.

I am sorry for mentioning names, but I am just trying to justify what I research. I thought since this forum is for helping people do this, there would not be a problem to gather some comparisons. Am I in the wrong online forum? Also, I respect that you would not take the products I mentioned. However, you did not tell me why that would not take them.

Mentioning a name isn't a problem, although once would be better than repeating posts. Without a link to their Supplement Facts sheet, I can't really evaluate Perfect Res Grape. I definitely prefer high purity resveratrol products; 98% or better. I would want to have some assurance that the product is clean, that the vendor tests every batch of raw materials, and that I could trust the vendor. Micronization is certainly a plus. In addition, I'd like it to be in suspended in a delivery agent, but those things cost money.

These guys claim they have no "fillers" or "binders", but I doubt that anyone else has fillers or binders either. Binders would only be used in a tablet, and everyone uses capsules. There isn't really any need for fillers given the amount of resveratrol in a dose. Did they say anything about agents used to ensure reliable capping? (Flow agents, anti-caking agents, lubricants?) I bet they aren't much different than anyone else in that regard. If they have a good price per gram and you want to roll the dice on purity, you could try them out. Personally, I would go with a company that was better known.


Ok, here is the link. I do like the fact that they claim there is a benefit to use the entire Muscadine Grape. http://www.powersupp...ol-compare.html Here is another link for it too http://www.perfect-resgrape.com/ .

#75 Mind

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Posted 18 April 2010 - 12:11 PM

The forum for discussing particular brand names is the Retailer/Product Discussion Forum. Use it.

Historically Imminst has tried to keep the supplement forums focused on the science of supplementation. What cellular processes does supplement XXX affect. What epidemiological evidence is available? Stuff like that. Don't post marketing materials in the supplement forum. Of course, every brand says they are the best. There are hundreds of brands of resv that say they ARE THE BEST! Marketing materials mean almost nothing. What little valid scientific info that is contained can be shared in the Retailer/Product Discussion Forum.

This particular thread started out with a good question, then quickly devolved into a brand war. One more link or mention of a retail brand, and I suggest the Navigators move it to Retailer/Product Discussion Forum.

Edited by Mind, 18 April 2010 - 12:14 PM.


#76 2tender

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Posted 18 April 2010 - 03:00 PM

I appreciate your posts to prompt discourse, but bolding a products name, twice in this forum may be borderline spamming. Most Resveratrol consumers here only use one source. They dont want this forum to become an overt advertisement. Hundreds of accounts have been deleted because of this stipulation. Personally, I dont and wouldnt use the products you mention.


I am sorry for mentioning names, but I am just trying to justify what I research. I thought since this forum is for helping people do this, there would not be a problem to gather some comparisons. Am I in the wrong online forum? Also, I respect that you would not take the products I mentioned. However, you did not tell me why that would not take them.

Thanks


I know where you are coming from with this. When I came here initially, I made the same mistakes and got a PM that told me, in a tactful way, what I was doing wrong. I looked at older posts and found that spammers had been opening dummy accounts to covertly advertise. I wouldnt use what you mentioned because what I use is what I prefer based on research and experience. All supplements are not created with the same level of quality. I try to refrain from mentioning brands and product names, although sometimes there is only one company that produces said product. Right now this is the only Resveratrol forum per se, so you are in the right place. The best Resveratrol supplements, that a person can use long term are of low emodin content, high purity, and micronized, thats my opinion based on research and experimentation. I hope it helps you!

#77 Anthony_Loera

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Posted 18 April 2010 - 07:47 PM

The product you talk about, shows that the resveratrol does not come from muscadine grapes. The resveratrol in this product comes from Japanese knotweed, it states this right on the label. Maybe you should buy whole muscadine grapes and simply take those, if you believe the small amounts of particular molecules found in muscadine extract are sufficient.

Personally, when I see that they added Resveratrol from Polygonum (japanese knotweed) it points to the fact that most of the benefits experienced will come from that ingredient, not any muscadine that placed in a product for marketing purposes. IT is very simply to copy this product, and label it all as natural without consequences.

I have no doubt it is specifically for marketing to folks who like "natural" in the label, and not because it is better than other products on the price watch list:
http://www.imminst.o...ers-t36436.html

Remember there is no 3rd party entity that certifies a product as 'natural'. At this point, anyone can stamp 'Natural' on their product label without consequences. Organic, is another matter... however if only one ingredient in a product is organic, a label can clearly market it as "Organic Ingredients".

Interesting marketing, but it is not a better product in my opinion than many on the price watch list.

A

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#78 joe57777

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Posted 20 April 2010 - 06:49 AM

Niner's response sounds like wise advice.

As for the current state of the science, on the many other topics in this forum, we've heard about a lot of mouse studies with mixed results. Currently there are 15 human clinical trials registered. The key things to note are

  • The only ones that have been completed so far are Phase I safety studies to show if it has bad side effects, not the ones designed to show that it does any good, which always come later.
  • None of the studies underway are designed to answer the question many of us really wonder about: "If you took two thousand healthy middle-aged people and gave a thousand of them resveratrol and a thousand of them a placebo for several decades, how many of each group would still be alive 40 or 50 years later?" No company wants to fund such a long study, and few of us want to wait that long to find out whether we should kick ourselves for not taking it or for taking it. The closest available studies are looking at "diseases of aging" like diabetes, obesity, cancer, and Alzheimer, in which the effects can be assessed in just a couple of years (and which the FDA recognizes as something they'll approve a drug for if it works).
  • There are only Phase III studies (the final type that the FDA would require before they'd let anyone sell it, if this were not a naturally occurring supplement), both in Alzheimer's. One of which calls itself a pilot study and ends in December 2010. The other ends in June 2011.

So if the standard of evidence you would personally find acceptable is that the FDA approves it as a drug for a disease you don't have, then science may have an answer in a little less than two years. If you need solid evidence that it slows down aging in our species, there are no trials currently planned that would directly answer that question. But those studies are both so small (50 or 60 subjects) and so short (a couple of years) that I'm guessing they'll be inconclusive unless resveratrol has a fairly powerful, obvious effect.

As for side effects, the Phase I studies have each enrolled at most 42 subjects, and even the Phase III studies are small. So if it gives one out of a hundred people a rash, all of the studies would probably miss it entirely (zero subjects affected) or assume it was a coincidence (one subject affected).



This is the way I see it. Resveratrol is good if it increases endurance, lowers blood sugar, is anti-cancer, helps your heart, improve libido, is a good chelator, etc... If it can do some or all of those things, then it has to improve the quality of life and may just help us to live longer. I get the purity part and the micronization. However, where the confusion comes in is where many people talk about different doses and different absorption levels. Then they say take it every other day, skip a month, etc. While I understand that the dosage is not standardized yet, people have been taking resveratrol in their own dosage and strengths for a while now. Therefore, they should have reports on what effects they are seeing in regards to endurance, blood sugar, cholesterol, libido, etc I would think enough so to come up with a standardized minimum dosage that should work for most everybody. However, then people mix in Quercetin, Cuminum, grape seed, D3, B-12, B6, Flax, melatonin, etc They take some things at different times so it does not interact. But how do we know that there is not an interaction already? Also, how do we know that we are not taking 2 or 3 things that do the same thing for our body and we are getting "too much" of a good thing which may turn out to be more harmful than good. My point is that these forums can be very confusing. You tell us to read, these forums, but it is very confusing to keep up with all of the variables. Not to mention hormone balancing for men.

I hope people see my point here.

Edited by Mind, 20 April 2010 - 06:54 AM.


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#79 TianZi

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Posted 03 May 2010 - 06:16 AM

Actually I think the current state of Science regarding Resveratrol is the same as it has been. More studies than not point to positive effects on general health, provided one is taking the purest available. The fact remains, that, some people cant tolerate it for extended periods of time. Personally, I think it is worth taking, in reasonable amounts, as opposed to not taking it. I draw this conclusion from the standpoint of not using it for weeks at a time, then re-starting. I definately feel a positive difference. I am using the best available purity, pre-emulsified and micronized product available though and in reasonably good health for a young senior citizen.



I see what you're saying. My issue is this: I've used a high quality formula on & off for several months, and noticed no benefits, except less skin irritation (rash or eczema) when not taking it!


The key words in your post are *several months*. By researching the effects of resveratrol, you'd realize the effects shouldn't be noticeable in such a short period of time.

For most people, the most significant potential benefit of taking reasonable quantities of resveratrol is slowing the aging process by some modest percentage. That's obviously not the kind of thing you notice in a few months and probably not in a handful of years either.

With that said, there *might* be a more dramatic benefit seen by people with cancer taking it while undergoing chemo. Or in taking an enormous quantity of the stuff to improve athletic performance, although such dosages might be dangerous for a human and incredibly expensive to boot.

If you are looking for something that will transform you in the way illegal steroids, etc. would in the space of weeks, resveratrol is not for you.




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