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Anyone who's into earthing/grounding?

grounding

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#31 platypus

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Posted 27 January 2016 - 09:34 AM

According to Wolframalpha a 70kg human consists of 7x10^27 atoms. All of these atoms have electrons which are exchanged all the time in chemical reactions. Could someone explain to me how a human body could be "low" in electrons and ions even in theory? 



#32 niner

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Posted 28 January 2016 - 01:44 AM

According to Wolframalpha a 70kg human consists of 7x10^27 atoms. All of these atoms have electrons which are exchanged all the time in chemical reactions. Could someone explain to me how a human body could be "low" in electrons and ions even in theory? 

 

Have you ever gotten a shock after walking on carpet on a very dry day?  It's very easy for the body to acquire a static charge in the electrically insulated modern environment.  For each electron in your body, there is (approximately) one proton.  If that wasn't the case, then you'd have a net charge.  Obviously, this happens all the time.  If you are in the vicinity of an electromagnetic field, mobile electrons will get pushed around. 

 

Here's another study that has more subjects: http://www.ncbi.nlm....es/PMC4590684/ 

 

If you look at the collected work on the effect of grounding on human physiology, and you consider the obvious electrical differences in the modern environment versus the environment we evolved in, it's pretty clear that there's something to this, and that it makes sense.  Unfortunately, that doesn't stop it from sounding "weird".  I'd like to see more labs working on this. 


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#33 platypus

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Posted 28 January 2016 - 10:12 AM

According to Wikipedia "the capacitance of the human body as high as 400 picofarads, and a charge of 50,000 volts"

 

https://en.wikipedia...ergies_involved

 

400 picofarads and 50000 volts equals a charge of 20 microcoulombs, which is the charge in 1.2x10^14 electrons. If we assume that there's one free electron per atom in the human body, the deficit/surplus of electrons is ~1/(6x10^13) or one part in 60 billion. I cannot imagine that this can have a large effect on the human body. 


Edited by platypus, 28 January 2016 - 10:13 AM.

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#34 niner

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Posted 28 January 2016 - 01:56 PM

400 picofarads and 50000 volts equals a charge of 20 microcoulombs, which is the charge in 1.2x10^14 electrons. If we assume that there's one free electron per atom in the human body, the deficit/surplus of electrons is ~1/(6x10^13) or one part in 60 billion. I cannot imagine that this can have a large effect on the human body. 

 

You're looking at it the wrong way.  1.2e14 molecules of a 500 dalton drug-like molecule would be a tenth of a microgram.  That's a very small dose, although there are some things that I'd strongly object to consuming a tenth of a microgram of.  However, electrons are special, because they hold a charge.  Their effects are out-sized compared to their weight.  1.2e14 hydroxyl radicals ripping into the DNA of 1.2e14 cells just turned your body into a giant tumor.

 

Applying first-principles physics to complex problems of biology rarely ends well.  You really need to look at the experimental data, and that data says that electron deficiencies can have negative effects on our physiology.



#35 platypus

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Posted 28 January 2016 - 02:27 PM

I don't see error-bars on their graphs and some of the axes do not start at zero. I'd like to see a similar study done by someone without connections to the grounding-industry. 



#36 platypus

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Posted 28 January 2016 - 03:44 PM

In other words, the studies are not massively convincing as all of them are connected to the grounding-industry. I'm trying to keep an open mind about the issue though.



#37 niner

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Posted 29 January 2016 - 02:07 AM

I'd like to see a similar study done by someone without connections to the grounding-industry. 

 

Yeah, me too.  Considering today's funding climate, it's probably hard to get the NIH to fund something that so many people think is "weird".  It's also hard to work on it if you think it's going to taint your career, which is dependent on what other people think, whether they're right or not.  There are multiple labs that have looked into grounding, although most work seems to be funded by the industry. 



#38 natasjlp

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Posted 03 February 2016 - 06:28 AM

Here is a PubMed article from the 'Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine' with no "financial interests" according to the report, with a decent group size, and double blind experiment:

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC3154031/

 

Objectives

This study was designed to answer the question: Does the contact of the human organism with the Earth via a copper conductor affect physiologic processes? 



#39 jroseland

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Posted 06 February 2021 - 08:38 AM

I do it whenever I get the chance! The beach is the best place. I include it in 10 Natural (Lesser-Known) Anti-Aging Biohacks

 
Natural%20Anti-Aging%20Biohacks%201280.j
 
Longevity is complicated. New science, drugs, and supplements are emerging and breaking paradigms. Before you spend a lot of time investigating them and money there are several low-hanging fruit natural biohacks that should be implemented.
 
 

 







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