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Microbiome – health & life span

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#1 albedo

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 04:42 PM


Interesting postulated correlation to life span and I assume also health span:

Functional metagenomic profiling of intestinal microbiome in extreme ageing
http://www.impactagi...ull/100623.html

“…We therefore postulate that pathobiont overgrowth can nurture a sort of pro-inflammatory loop which could worsen the health status of aged people. We can also hypothesize that in centenarians -the extreme limit of human life span - some readjustments take place within the core mutualistic microbiome functions that serve to offset detrimental activities associated with pathobiont overgrowth…”

I found also interesting comments on the microbiome topic in this Forum:

http://www.longecity...in-enhancement/

http://www.longecity...est-initiative/

http://www.longecity...iome-sequenced/
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#2 Kevnzworld

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 06:24 PM

I found this part of the discussion interesting. Tryptophan converts to Melatonin. They make the link between tryptophan and dementia.
" Among these, we observed an age-related increased abundance of genes involved in the tryptophan metabolism pathway (ko00380). This evidence is in agreement with the reduction of tryptophan found in serum of centenarians [22], although we cannot directly infer causality. Linking together the two observations, we advance the hypothesis that the potential increase of consumption of tryptophan by the gut microbiota affects its bioavailability within the host. A recent study showed patients with inflammatory diseases to have a significant depletion of serum levels of tryptophan compared to control population [23] and Huang et al. demonstrated a clear relationship between reduced serum tryptophan levels and an increase of immune activation [24]. In addition, the decrease of the serum level of tryptophan was associated with cognitive deficit in senile dementias [25-27], and Noristani et al. demonstrated that high triptophan diet lead to a reduction of the plaque pathology in Alzheimer's disease in mouse [28]. It is thus tempting to speculate that a microbiota-dependent reduction of tryptophan can nurture inflammaging in centenarians and could worsen the conditions of the patients affected by cognitive deficit."
http://www.impactagi...ull/100623.html
Never underestimate probiotics, melatonin and tryptophan , especially for older people who may take antibiotics more often.

Edited by Kevnzworld, 19 March 2014 - 06:25 PM.

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#3 niner

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 10:16 PM

Very cool. It's not very surprising that the microbiota of centenarians differs from people 30 years younger, but are we looking at cause or effect? This is just a pilot study, so they'll be doing a lot of followup. It has a lot in common with Craig Venter's new longevity project. The EU group is looking at the microbiome and metabolome to some degree, while Venter will also look at the genome and proteome, and probably deeper into the metabolome. I hope that Venter doesn't blow all his funding on the genome, because I don't think it's going to generate the sort of actionable intelligence that the microbiome and metabolome will produce.

The people involved in this pilot study are engaged in a larger project called Nu-Age, a public/private consortium that seeks to design a healthy diet specifically for the elderly.
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#4 albedo

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 11:17 PM

This is "only" on Drosophila, yet it connects longevity to dysbiosis (and I guess non-coincidentally: inflammation, reduced immunity and dysplasia !)

PGRP-SC2 promotes gut immune homeostasis to limit commensal dysbiosis and extend lifespan.
"...Our results highlight the importance of commensal control for lifespan of metazoans and identify SC-class PGRPs as longevity-promoting factors..."
http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/24439372

#5 albedo

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Posted 25 October 2014 - 07:15 PM

A very dense presentation from Dr. Claudio Franceschi et al. on Inflammaging theory, NU-AGE, microbiome, dysbiosis and links with disease is here. A key point he is doing is that "Nutritional Re-Programming of the aging process is possible/doable and should be pursued". Kevnzworld's point is addressed at slide 67 in particular " The increased consumption of tryptophan by the gut microbiota, affects its bioavailability within the host, and can nurture inflammaging."

 

 


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#6 Logic

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Posted 26 October 2014 - 01:54 AM

Tryptophan is used in the de novo production NAD NADP, ATP etc. and hence SIRT, PARP etc.
Funny how a lot of dots are joining!
Supplementing with Niacin is not going to cover all the bases and Ribose spikes cause glycation on entry and exit from the system and probably also doesn't cover all the bases?
Was there any word on phosphates and other nutrients?

Interesting find. Thx
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#7 albedo

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Posted 29 April 2015 - 01:11 PM

This is a well known study from the same group indentifying metabolic signatures for long life (bold is mine)

 

Metabolic Signatures of Extreme Longevity in Northern Italian Centenarians Reveal a Complex Remodeling of Lipids, Amino Acids, and Gut Microbiota Metabolism

http://journals.plos...al.pone.0056564

 

Abstract

The aging phenotype in humans has been thoroughly studied but a detailed metabolic profiling capable of shading light on the underpinning biological processes of longevity is still missing. Here using a combined metabonomics approach compromising holistic 1H-NMR profiling and targeted MS approaches, we report for the first time the metabolic phenotype of longevity in a well characterized human aging cohort compromising mostly female centenarians, elderly, and young individuals. With increasing age, targeted MS profiling of blood serum displayed a marked decrease in tryptophan concentration, while an unique alteration of specific glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids are seen in the longevity phenotype. We hypothesized that the overall lipidome changes specific to longevity putatively reflect centenarians' unique capacity to adapt/respond to the accumulating oxidative and chronic inflammatory conditions characteristic of their extreme aging phenotype. Our data in centenarians support promotion of cellular detoxification mechanisms through specific modulation of the arachidonic acid metabolic cascade as we underpinned increased concentration of 8,9-EpETrE, suggesting enhanced cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme activity. Such effective mechanism might result in the activation of an anti-oxidative response, as displayed by decreased circulating levels of 9-HODE and 9-oxoODE, markers of lipid peroxidation and oxidative products of linoleic acid. Lastly, we also revealed that the longevity process deeply affects the structure and composition of the human gut microbiota as shown by the increased extrection of phenylacetylglutamine (PAG) and p-cresol sulfate (PCS) in urine of centenarians. Together, our novel approach in this representative Italian longevity cohort support the hypothesis that a complex remodeling of lipid, amino acid metabolism, and of gut microbiota functionality are key regulatory processes marking exceptional longevity in humans.

 

post-16306-0-35116900-1430312584_thumb.j

 

"...three distinct metabolic patterns : (i) set of compounds that that monotonically increased or decreased (statistically significant) with age (Fig. 1A, Table S3), likely representing metabolic signatures of the aging process, such as decreased concentrations of Tryptophan (Trp), lysophospatidylcholines (LPC 18:2, LPC 20:4), increased levels of PC 32:0 and sphingomyelins (SM 24:1, SM 16:0); (ii) a set of compounds remaining largely unchanged until age 70 and undergoing significant changes in centenarians (Fig. 1B, Table S3), characterized by a complex pattern of decreased concentration in sphingomyelins and specific glycerophospholipids (SM-OH 22:1, LPC 18:0, SM 24:0, PC-O 34:3, PC-O 36:4, PC-O 40:1, PC 36:2) and increased concentration in specific glycerophospholipids (PCO 32:1, PC-O 34:1); (iii) set of compounds which changes in the elderly, but is remarkably similar in young subjects and centenarians, (Fig. 1C, Table S3), putatively representing the metabolic phenotype of longevity, characterized by an increased concentration of specific glycerophospholipids (PC34:4, PC36:6, PC 36:5, PC 38:4, PC 38:6, PC 40:6, PC-O 38:0, PC-O 38:6)..."

 

"...Such effective mechanism might results in the activation and successful antioxidative response, as displayed by the decreased concentration
of 9-HODE, and 9-oxoODE in centenarians. Compared to elderly, centenarians also presented depletion of eicosapentanoic acid (EPA), an omega-3 fatty acid, which can be synthesized in humans from alpha-linoleic acid or in greater amount directly from oily fishes..."

 

post-16306-0-83894500-1430312989_thumb.j

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#8 albedo

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Posted 28 August 2015 - 10:09 PM

This article (fully text) outlines the difficulties but also the hopes of nutritional interventions on gut microbiota for health span:

 

Microbiota and healthy ageing: observational and nutritional intervention studies

 

Hundred years ago Metchnikoff associated human health and particularly healthy ageing with a specific type of gut microbiota. Classical culture methods associated a decrease in bifidobacteria and an increase in enterobacteria with ageing. Modern molecular methods blurred this simple picture and documented a substantial inter-individual variability for the gut microbiome even when stratifying the elderly subjects according to health status. Nutritional interventions with resistant starch showed consistent gut microbiota changes across studies from different geographical areas and prebiotic supplementation induced a 10-fold increase in gut bifidobacteria. However, in the ELDERMET study, microbiota changes do not precede, but follow the changes in health status of elderly subjects possibly as a consequence of diet changes.

 

http://onlinelibrary...7915.12048/full

 

And this one is a nice review of the subject:

 

The Three Genetics (Nuclear DNA, Mitochondrial DNA, and Gut Microbiome) of Longevity in Humans Considered as Metaorganisms

 

Usually the genetics of human longevity is restricted to the nuclear genome (nDNA). However it is well known that the nDNA interacts with a physically and functionally separated genome, the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) that, even if limited in length and number of genes encoded, plays a major role in the ageing process. The complex interplay between nDNA/mtDNA and the environment is most likely involved in phenomena such as ageing and longevity. To this scenario we have to add another level of complexity represented by the microbiota, that is, the whole set of bacteria present in the different part of our body with their whole set of genes. In particular, several studies investigated the role of gut microbiota (GM) modifications in ageing and longevity and an age-related GM signature was found. In this view, human being must be considered as “metaorganism” and a more holistic approach is necessary to grasp the complex dynamics of the interaction between the environment and nDNA-mtDNA-GM of the host during ageing. In this review, the relationship between the three genetics and human longevity is addressed to point out that a comprehensive view will allow the researchers to properly address the complex interactions that occur during human lifespan.

 

http://www.hindawi.c...ri/2014/560340/


Edited by albedo, 28 August 2015 - 10:13 PM.


#9 albedo

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Posted 29 August 2015 - 10:27 PM

From the same group, posted above, of Dr Claudio Franceschi (inflammageing theory, study on the centenarians gut microbiota, ...) and folks from Nestlè (related to the nutritional intervention) I found also this study outlining aging biomarkers:

 

Serum profiling of healthy aging identifies phospho- and sphingolipid species as markers of human longevity

 

"...In conclusion, in this work we identified, by 1H-NMR metabonomics and shot-gun lipidomics, important metabolic signature in serum of healthy aging in a representative longevity cohort. It is important to denote that this work additionally complement previous investigations on longevity studies, yet specifically studying people who reached extreme longevity (centenarians). The represented changes reflect that longevity is marked by better antioxidant capacity and a well-developed membrane lipid remodelling process able to maintain cell integrity. Moreover, in the light of very recent data indicating glycerophosphocholine as a circulating marker related to cell senescence [30], our data are suggestive of the fact that centenarians are characterised by lower levels of cell senescence with respect to old subjects. As a whole, these data support the hypothesis that from a metabolic point of view centenarians are younger than their chronological age. Future work will be required to more precisely assess the predictive role of our markers in additional cohorts and to determine the effect of nutrition and genetic determinants in shaping healthy aging..."

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC3927806/

 



#10 albedo

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 12:17 PM

An interesting article out of NU-AGE project:

 

Studies of gut bacteria are beginning to untangle how diet affects health in old age — but determining cause and effect is tricky.

http://www.nu-age.eu..._2012 copia.pdf

 

"...NU-AGE is exactly the kind of large, longitudinal study that scientists the world over are clamouring for. The hope is that interrogating the link between diet and the microbiome will show how some of our trillions of microbial hitchhikers can steer us to long and healthy lives — and how we can entice them to stay..."



#11 albedo

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Posted 29 May 2016 - 01:26 PM

Very interesting microbiota trajectory study and longevity characterizing it by a simultaneous shrinkage of core microbiota occuring while acquiring longevity adapted subdominant fractions:

Attached File  Longevity Microbiota Trajectory.PNG   116.23KB   2 downloads

 

Gut Microbiota and Extreme Longevity

http://www.cell.com/...9822(16)30338-4

 

"The study of the extreme limits of human lifespan may allow a better understanding of how human beings can escape, delay, or survive the most frequent age-related causes of morbidity, a peculiarity shown by long-living individuals. Longevity is a complex trait in which genetics, environment, and stochasticity concur to determine the chance to reach 100 or more years of age [ 1 ]. Because of its impact on human metabolism and immunology, the gut microbiome has been proposed as a possible determinant of healthy aging [ 2, 3 ]. Indeed, the preservation of host-microbes homeostasis can counteract inflammaging [ 4 ], intestinal permeability [ 5 ], and decline in bone and cognitive health [ 6, 7 ]. Aiming at deepening our knowledge on the relationship between the gut microbiota and a long-living host, we provide for the first time the phylogenetic microbiota analysis of semi-supercentenarians, i.e., 105–109 years old, in comparison to adults, elderly, and centenarians, thus reconstructing the longest available human microbiota trajectory along aging. We highlighted the presence of a core microbiota of highly occurring, symbiotic bacterial taxa (mostly belonging to the dominant Ruminococcaceae, Lachnospiraceae, and Bacteroidaceae families), with a cumulative abundance decreasing along with age. Aging is characterized by an increasing abundance of subdominant species, as well as a rearrangement in their co-occurrence network. These features are maintained in longevity and extreme longevity, but peculiarities emerged, especially in semi-supercentenarians, describing changes that, even accommodating opportunistic and allochthonous bacteria, might possibly support health maintenance during aging, such as an enrichment and/or higher prevalence of health-associated groups (e.g., Akkermansia, Bifidobacterium, and Christensenellaceae)."


Edited by albedo, 29 May 2016 - 01:28 PM.


#12 Nate-2004

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Posted 14 June 2016 - 08:35 PM

Can someone explain the overall hypothesis or theory being suggested here in layman's terms? I'm reading through this thread and through the linked studies and what I am understanding so far is that:

 

1) There is an increase in the depletion of tryptophan (a tryptophan deficiency?). Does this mean more melatonin is being produced or less?

2) There is a change in the overall populations of various microbiota, possibly due to the increased use of antibiotics or possibly due to something else. Regardless I'm trying to understand whether this is a good thing or a bad thing. Is it causing the supercentenarians to live longer or what?

 

Is this the kind of bacteria found in yogurt or your average probiotic supplement or some other kind that can't be easily replaced? Just wondering as I take a holy f*load of probiotics every day (by that I mean I eat yogurt every day and take a RenewLife pill with that in addition to the occasional 50g of Jacob's raw sauerkraut).


Edited by Nate-2004, 14 June 2016 - 08:37 PM.


#13 albedo

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Posted 18 June 2016 - 06:03 AM

Nate,

 

I think the group led by C. Franceschi came to realize inflammation is key in aging (“inflammaging”), as one would expect, but found details are much more complex. The best and simplest description I found is in a great 2015 review paper (1) where other well-known aging experts also contributed (the paper touches on some of the molecules Logic mentions in his previous post too):

 

Chronic, low-grade inflammation is recognized as a major characteristic of aging. This phenomenon is so pervasive that the term inflammaging (Franceschi et al., 2000; Franceschi & Campisi, 2014) has been coined to emphasize that many major age-related disabilities, including cancers, susceptibility to infections, and dementia have immunopathogenic components (Franceschi & Campisi, 2014). Thus, as inflammation is associated with many age-related conditions, genes and pathways that regulate inflammation are candidate targets to combat them (Franceschi & Campisi, 2014).  Inflammaging appears to be much more complex than we previously thought, and a variety of tissues and organs participate in producing inflammatory stimuli (Franceschi et al., 2007; Cevenini et al., 2012). The list is extensive and includes the immune system, but also adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, liver, and the gut. The gut is of unique importance, because it is the body’s largest immune organ and contains trillions of bacteria that can release inflammatory stimuli into the portal and systemic circulation (Biagi et al., 2010).

 

To come to your two questions, as tryptophan metabolizes to melatonin I guess there is an overall reduction of melatonin:

 

Attached File  Mealtonin_biosynth.jpg   13.94KB   0 downloads

https://en.wikipedia.../wiki/Melatonin

 

However, consider that there is a huge difference between gut and pineal gland content of melatonin. Studies (2) have shown that melatonin in the gut is about 400x higher than in pineal gland. So it must be important for the gut even if its function there is less clear than in the central nervous system. There are important hints though e.g. related to irritable bowel syndrome, colon motility and immune system regulation. Also, gut melatonin is independent from day/night cycles while depending on age.

 

A depletion in tryptophan also looks not a good thing as reported in C. Franceschi’s slide 67 of his presentation and my post as it can finally nurture inflammation. They noticed an increased abundance of genes involved in the tryptophan metabolism pathway in the centenarians:

 

Attached File  Tryptophan.PNG   71.26KB   0 downloads

 

Attached File  Tryptophan 2.PNG   177.85KB   0 downloads

 

What about supplementation?

 

I would say that if I do not have the major troubles as above, my mood is OK and I sleep well, I would not care too much about supplementation with tryptophan and melatonin on regular basis. OTOS, probiotics could be a good idea with the well-known health beneficial strains. I would also run a microbiological stool analysis at baseline. However, I think we are far from specific strains self-prescription based on the centenarian study I reported (such as Akkermansia, Bifidobacterium and Christensenellaceae).  The study makes clear that, while it could be hypothesized: “It is not possible to know whether these health-associated features were already present at a younger age in these exceptional individuals, and/or they are somewhat related to the past lifestyle, due to the cross-sectional nature of the study; indeed, only longitudinal studies, which would be very difficult to apply to the field of human longevity, could explain whether these gut bacteria are always lost during aging and reacquired by the subjects who get to live longer or whether they are maintained across aging and longevity only by long-living subjects.

 

Maybe a smarter idea before we clarify if all those microorganisms characterizing the centenarians can be supplemented to our benefit is to look at pre-biotics and nutrients they like and let the gut microbiome adapts and balances (homeostasis). A thread on the Reddit forum for example has looked at Akkermansia and suggests pomegranates, fructooligosaccharides, glucosamine, glutamine and fish oil are good nutrients for those bacteria.

 

The EU’s NU-AGE project posted before by Niner ended in April 2016 (you have good webminars on the final closing conference with highlights and results, look first at the highlights by C. Franceschi) and is all about a “whole diet”, basically a Mediterranean ad-hoc fortified for the elderly diet (look at Agnes Berendsen's presentation) positively impacting the elderly toward an healthy aging, an urgent and healthcare European cost priority.

 

So in sum and barring major diseases, I think probiotics are a good idea but before going to more exotic types in search of what possibly benefited centenarians, it is maybe smarter to get first a “whole diet” as per the NU-AGE project, to which I would add a stool microbiology analysis and possibly use some of the nutrients which centenarians typical strains such as Akkermansia, Bifidobacterium and Christensenellaceae like to eat and are also beneficial for a host of other conditions (e.g. consider the effects of pomegranates and fish oil)

 

(1)          Interventions to Slow Aging in Humans: Are We Ready?

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/25902704

 

(2)          Distribution, function and physiological role of melatonin in the lower gut.

 

 


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#14 normalizing

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Posted 01 July 2016 - 06:50 AM

albedo, i have not heard of Akkermansia bacteria before i read this thread, im curious now as to how do we get this one in us since all the probiotics i see have the usual bifido, lacto etc bacterias. any idea as to how one can consume it? no food source that i have found.

 

edit: after reading this; "It is thought that eating the bacterium increases the gut wall thickness, with the addition of mucin, which will block food from being absorbed by the body" is this even a good thing?


Edited by normalizing, 01 July 2016 - 07:08 AM.


#15 Multivitz

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Posted 01 July 2016 - 11:28 AM

So it all revolves around Phospholipids and marco mineral balance that controls the biome once it has established. Cool.

#16 albedo

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Posted 03 July 2016 - 02:44 PM

albedo, i have not heard of Akkermansia bacteria before i read this thread, im curious now as to how do we get this one in us since all the probiotics i see have the usual bifido, lacto etc bacterias. any idea as to how one can consume it? no food source that i have found.....

Sorry, I have not researched this myself. Some info is on the Reddit post I quoted in my post.



#17 albedo

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Posted 13 July 2016 - 01:07 PM

A fascinating result from EPFL on the beneficial effect of pomegranate spot by Normalizing here. I thought useful to report it also here for those following this thread:

 

Gut bacteria unleash anti-aging power of pomegranates

http://www.medicalne...cles/311572.php

 

 


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#18 normalizing

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Posted 13 July 2016 - 01:36 PM

albedo same question i asked there, what is the type of bacteria to do this? the article does mention specifically this, not all bacteria does it and most people might not have that specific type. yet, we do not even know which type that is!


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#19 Nate-2004

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Posted 13 July 2016 - 01:55 PM

According to Wikipedia:

 

Individuals producing urolithins show a much higher abundance of the Clostridium leptum group of Firmicutes phylum than Bacteroides or Prevotella.[7]

 


Edited by Nate-2004, 13 July 2016 - 01:55 PM.

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#20 normalizing

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Posted 13 July 2016 - 06:46 PM

well, thats nice! this bacteria is not present in any fermented food or probiotic supplement that i know of. its highly likely we are all deficient on it



#21 Nate-2004

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Posted 13 July 2016 - 06:58 PM

well, thats nice! this bacteria is not present in any fermented food or probiotic supplement that i know of. its highly likely we are all deficient on it

 

https://www.reddit.c...se_clostridium/

 

We shall see.



#22 normalizing

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 02:33 AM

 

well, thats nice! this bacteria is not present in any fermented food or probiotic supplement that i know of. its highly likely we are all deficient on it

 

https://www.reddit.c...se_clostridium/

 

We shall see.

 

 

ok now this is getting perplexing;
 

"Why would you want to increase it? The Handbook of Prebiotics pg 407by Roberfroid and Gibson indicate that it is a strain found in the elderly as bifido populations are on the decrease, this particular strain you mention is on the increase.

I think that's bad. I think that the studies that indicate that the oldest people on earth having the tendency to have more bifido is indicative of something. They've done studies in those who live beyond 100 years and find that they really do have higher amounts of bifido"



#23 Nate-2004

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 03:09 AM

 

 

well, thats nice! this bacteria is not present in any fermented food or probiotic supplement that i know of. its highly likely we are all deficient on it

 

https://www.reddit.c...se_clostridium/

 

We shall see.

 

 

ok now this is getting perplexing;
 

"Why would you want to increase it? The Handbook of Prebiotics pg 407by Roberfroid and Gibson indicate that it is a strain found in the elderly as bifido populations are on the decrease, this particular strain you mention is on the increase.

I think that's bad. I think that the studies that indicate that the oldest people on earth having the tendency to have more bifido is indicative of something. They've done studies in those who live beyond 100 years and find that they really do have higher amounts of bifido"

 

 

More irritating than perplexing, the guy didn't even read what I had to say about it. I explained exactly why one would want to increase it.



#24 normalizing

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 12:56 PM

but its perplexing, why would people get more of this bacteria as they get old compared to the bifido he mentioned plus the other normally encountered one? thats what confused me. regardless of clostridium benefit from the metabolities it can produce, why it is the predominant one in aging people? to be honest, why not just have the normally accepted healthy bacteria we have in youth in comparison and completely ignore the healthy metabolites clostridium will produce anyway?



#25 normalizing

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Posted 21 July 2016 - 04:46 PM

today i found this article; http://www.medicalne...cles/311814.php

 

so using antibiotics it removes microglia or activates microglia im confused as to stimulating or disabling microglia works better but what is interesting it shifts gut bacteria in a way to help with alzheimer

"The gut microbiome changes indicate that that the composition and diversity of gut bacteria could be fundamental in regulating immune system activity that influences AD progression" so does that mean killing your friendly bacteria is good or bad, im just completely confused by this statement as antibiotics can only influence the bacteria in one way and that is kill it all! so are good bacteria even good for us if antibiotics seem to prevent neuroinflamation as they destroy them?

 

then later i found this interesting new study too; https://www.scienced...60720105304.htm which is contradictory to the first heh



#26 albedo

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Posted 31 July 2016 - 01:40 PM

albedo same question i asked there, what is the type of bacteria to do this? the article does mention specifically this, not all bacteria does it and most people might not have that specific type. yet, we do not even know which type that is!

I did not have time yet to dig into EPFL's paper but found this study which reportedly is the first to demonstrate a pure strain producing urolithins (but for urolithin A the authors also say other bacteria might be needed)

 

"...The isolate belongs to a new species described as Gordonibacter urolithinfaciens, sp. nov. The type strain of the Gordonibacter genus, Gordonibacter pamelaeae DSM 19378(T), was also demonstrated to produce urolithins...." (bold mine)

 

Description of urolithin production capacity from ellagic acid of two human intestinal Gordonibacter species.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/24909569

 

The Gordonibacter bacteria taxonomy description is here:

http://www.ncbi.nlm....=Info&id=657308

 

Related and relevant to this thread is that "...The potential systemic biological effects of pomegranate juice ingestion should be attributed to the colonic microflora metabolites rather than to the polyphenols present in the juice..."

http://www.ncbi.nlm....ubmed/15309440/


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#27 normalizing

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Posted 01 August 2016 - 02:25 PM

albedo ive never heard of this bacteria and i have never seen its consumption in any foods or drinks that humans have been consuming so im very confused as to how some people have acquired it to begin with. perhaps its natural in all of us from the get go? but then how do you even balance it and not let it die out, considering, there is absolutely no well known predominant source to re-supply it???



#28 normalizing

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Posted 02 August 2016 - 05:38 AM

btw i fuck with those fuckers a bit too much it seems. once a while ill feed em some prebotics to get shit smoothed out between us and as expected they will give me "gas" as good signal thats like comparable to white smoke indians give out to welcome strangers in their camps. but on other days ill fuck em pretty bad with ethanol, garlic, tea and all the antibacterial foods and herbs most common folk actually do consume regularly as a matter of fact and they will cramp up, bloat me and not give gas out signals as usual, but more like irritable brain fog signals that i hate.

 

these bastards control our lives. FACT


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#29 pamojja

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Posted 02 August 2016 - 09:53 AM

... and they will cramp up, bloat me and not give gas out signals as usual, but more like irritable brain fog signals that i hate.

 

these bastards control our lives. FACT

 

Life usually goes well in mutual friendship, especially in this case where divorce would be impossible. Each taking care of the needs of the other, to some extent.

 

Why not try and show a little empathy to these 90 percent of cells of yourself? Feed them regularly some pre-biotics and they become your best friend, doing everything in helping to make you feel better.

 

Hate them and they tread you accordingly. ;)


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#30 albedo

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Posted 02 August 2016 - 12:19 PM

albedo ive never heard of this bacteria and i have never seen its consumption in any foods or drinks that humans have been consuming so im very confused as to how some people have acquired it to begin with. perhaps its natural in all of us from the get go? but then how do you even balance it and not let it die out, considering, there is absolutely no well known predominant source to re-supply it???

 

I wish I could answer to your questions! From the little I know, I think nobody has really find a way, clinically proven, to simply steer your gut microbiota to a specific profile, at least generally and in healthy populations. I also wonder if this should be attempted at all in the first place. Consider also the vast number of species in the colon (300-1000) even though 30-40 species can account for 99% of bacteria incl. colon, stomach and small intestine (here).

 

All what I am reporting here is basically research and we are far from the clinical. So while, yes, considering centenarians gut Akkermansia and others or Gordonibacter for manufacturing urolithins and also looking at what the supplementation marketing will invent with new strands, my best bet is to run a stool microbiology test first to see how you are doing and use good pre-biotics. I think a Mediterranean style diet full of vegetables and high in fibers is the best bet. Actually I would not abuse with pro-biotics to maintain an health competition between strains and good balance. Personally, I also try and keep my colon empty to avoid toxins re-absorption and try to go 3x after the 3x daily meals as an anti-cancer strategy.


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