• Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log In with Google      Sign In    
  • Create Account
  LongeCity
              Advocacy & Research for Unlimited Lifespans

Photo
* * * * * 1 votes

DNA preservation at home

dna preservation vitrification home at home

  • Please log in to reply
19 replies to this topic
⌛⇒ support MITOMOUSE via LongeCity!

#1 seivtcho

  • Guest
  • 2,008 posts
  • 408
  • Location:Bulgaria

Posted 14 November 2014 - 05:12 PM


While digging in internet for vitrification procedures, I stumbled upon a technique, that those, who want to preserve tissues of themselvs or their relatives can use at home conditions. It is literary holding a skin tissue for a while in a room temperature in a specific solution, and then directly placing it in liquid nitrogen. Fast and easy, without rocket science. Easy to be done at home.

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/10935811

 

"

Abstract

The vitrification technique was applied to the preservation of human skin. This technique was simple, and no expensive equipment was needed. Split-thickness human skins from 8 patients were immersed in vitrification solution for 10 minutes at room temperature, immediately plunged into a liquid nitrogen tank, and cryopreserved for 3 weeks. The vitrification solution consisted of 40% ethylene glycol (vol/vol) and phosphate buffered saline solution that contained 30% Ficoll 70 (vol/vol; Wako Junyaku, Co, Tokyo, Japan) and 0.5 mol/L sucrose. The viability of vitrified and cryopreserved skin was evaluated with the trypan blue dye exclusion test, the methyl-thiazoldiphenyl-tetrazolium (MTT) colorimetric assay, and a culture test of the keratinocytes obtained from vitrified skin. The results of the trypan blue dye exclusion test showed 87.4% of viable cells, and MTT developed an average 0.817 absorbance. When vitrified skin was compared with 4 degrees C refrigerated skins after 3 weeks of storage, the difference of viability was significant both on the trypan blue dye exclusion test (P < .05) and on the MTT assay (P < .01). However, there was no significant difference in the viability of vitrified skins compared with fresh skin. Furthermore, keratinocytes from vitrified skin grew uneventfully in culture test. We used these vitrified skin allografts for patients with flame burns and electric burns. These allografts took well in both cases and promoted wound healing. We concluded that the vitrification method for skin preservation is simple and reliable, and this method could contribute to skin banking.

 

"


Edited by seivtcho, 14 November 2014 - 05:12 PM.

  • like x 2

#2 ceridwen

  • Guest
  • 1,287 posts
  • 94

Member Away
  • Location:UK

Posted 14 November 2014 - 08:56 PM

Neurons can be grown from skin cells. I'm sure there's an article on science daily saying how skin cells can turn into stem cells that can grow into neurons. The fact that the skin cells can be stored at home is very exciting.
  • like x 1

#3 seivtcho

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 2,008 posts
  • 408
  • Location:Bulgaria

Posted 15 November 2014 - 06:21 AM

Yup. As far as I know, the majority of the people, who want to preserve their DNA is to clone themselvs some day, but preserving cells for making stem cells is an awesome idea :) You never know what you'll need after many years.


  • like x 1

⌛⇒ support MITOMOUSE via LongeCity!

#4 Antonio2014

  • Guest
  • 634 posts
  • 52
  • Location:Spain
  • NO

Posted 15 November 2014 - 10:38 AM

Why will you want to make stem cells from your old cells instead of your present cells? I understand wanting to freeze eggs or embryos, but skin cells?


Edited by Antonio2014, 15 November 2014 - 10:39 AM.


#5 seivtcho

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 2,008 posts
  • 408
  • Location:Bulgaria

Posted 15 November 2014 - 12:57 PM

Well... the stem cells produced from older cells are supposed not to be as good, as those, produced from a younger tissue. So, freezing skin, and making stem cells from it later in your life, may appear to be the correct way for receiving younger stem cells genetically identical to your body. Plus there are some people, who want to clone themselvs, or to clone their relatives in the future, and some sort of genetic material is needed for this purpose.


  • like x 1

#6 seivtcho

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 2,008 posts
  • 408
  • Location:Bulgaria

Posted 17 November 2014 - 02:11 PM

I wonder if other people have been thinking about preserving their own, or their relatives DNA in home conditions. If you want, you may share opinions and techniques.



#7 Danail

  • Guest
  • 35 posts
  • 6

Posted 23 November 2014 - 04:33 PM

Can't tissue be kept in a ordinary freezer? There exist cases of dna taken from long time frozen tissues in the nature.
  • Good Point x 1

#8 chubtoad

  • Life Member
  • 976 posts
  • 5
  • Location:Illinois

Posted 23 November 2014 - 09:03 PM

Wait... How am I supposed to get the skin off I want to store?  This does not sound like a pleasent experiment.



#9 seivtcho

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 2,008 posts
  • 408
  • Location:Bulgaria

Posted 24 November 2014 - 07:39 AM

Don't you cut small pieces of skin from your fingers, after cutting your nails ? :) Is this skin good enough for storing DNA ? :) :)


  • Good Point x 1

⌛⇒ support MITOMOUSE via LongeCity!

#10 Danail

  • Guest
  • 35 posts
  • 6

Posted 24 November 2014 - 10:07 PM

We need some genetics expert to come and tell us if the DNA can survive without damage in the freezer
  • Agree x 1

#11 Antonio2014

  • Guest
  • 634 posts
  • 52
  • Location:Spain
  • NO

Posted 25 November 2014 - 07:22 AM

You don't need an expert. DNA is routinely freezed and used after unfrozen (for example, in IVF clinics).



#12 seivtcho

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 2,008 posts
  • 408
  • Location:Bulgaria

Posted 25 November 2014 - 09:52 AM

But they don't keep it in a freezer... do they?



#13 Danail

  • Guest
  • 35 posts
  • 6

Posted 25 November 2014 - 02:20 PM

Lol
I really ment a regular freezer

#14 ceridwen

  • Guest
  • 1,287 posts
  • 94

Member Away
  • Location:UK

Posted 26 November 2014 - 12:21 AM

I would like to find some way of storing stem cells in the hope of turning them into stem cells some day but the only stem cell banks I could find were storing babies stem cells for those lucky enough to be born later than me. Can anyone help me find some where I could store my cells?

#15 Danail

  • Guest
  • 35 posts
  • 6

Posted 26 November 2014 - 10:16 PM

Store skin cells on your own via the above methodics.

#16 Kalliste

  • Guest
  • 1,050 posts
  • 119

Posted 27 November 2014 - 04:46 AM

I wonder if there is a bank-like service that would allow one to store samples of cells and DNA, that might give one an advantage when/if repair technology starts coming online.



#17 Antonio2014

  • Guest
  • 634 posts
  • 52
  • Location:Spain
  • NO

Posted 27 November 2014 - 08:42 AM

Kriorus and CI store tissues.


  • Informative x 1

#18 John Schloendorn

  • Guest, Advisor, Guardian
  • 2,542 posts
  • 156
  • Location:Mountain View, CA

Posted 29 November 2014 - 01:09 AM

 DNA in home conditions. If you want, you may share opinions and techniques.

 

 

If you want just DNA, you don't need to freeze it.  This kind of system will preserve it at room temp essentially forever http://www.amazon.co...r/dp/B00394FISS.  If you don't feel like dropping $100s on the brand name version, you can do the same thing with a $1 sheet of silica paper. 


  • Informative x 1
  • like x 1

#19 Danail

  • Guest
  • 35 posts
  • 6

Posted 29 November 2014 - 02:16 PM

That's interesting. Writd more about thr silica paper.

⌛⇒ support MITOMOUSE via LongeCity!

#20 seivtcho

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 2,008 posts
  • 408
  • Location:Bulgaria

Posted 19 January 2015 - 09:11 PM

 

 DNA in home conditions. If you want, you may share opinions and techniques.

 

 

If you want just DNA, you don't need to freeze it.  This kind of system will preserve it at room temp essentially forever http://www.amazon.co...r/dp/B00394FISS.  If you don't feel like dropping $100s on the brand name version, you can do the same thing with a $1 sheet of silica paper. 

 

 

Have you tried silica paper for DNA preservation at room temperature?







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: dna, preservation, vitrification, home, at home

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users