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Personalized Nutrition

personalized nutrition personalized medicine nutrigenomics nutrigenetics

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#181 albedo

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 04:04 PM

Thank you Ceridwen. Yes, it is perfectly understandable you do not do that and post what is publicly available. Let us know what you discover and in case you suffer of the syndrome whether or not the proposed modification were effective. I would be curious to know if Dr Axe mentions the zinc status: in serious conditions zinc supplementation was shown to be helpful, e.g. see:

Sturniolo GC, Di leo V, Ferronato A, D'odorico A, D'incà R. Zinc supplementation tightens "leaky gut" in Crohn's disease. Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2001;7(2):94-8.

 

 



#182 albedo

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Posted 09 February 2018 - 11:12 AM

Personalized Nutrition and Precision Medicine overlaps to some extent and more and more call for AI and technologies such as Blockchain. Herewith a truly excellent review and architecture framework by Insilico:

 

Converging blockchain and next-generation artificial intelligence technologies to decentralize and accelerate biomedical research and healthcare

http://www.oncotarge...45&path[]=70701



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#183 albedo

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Posted 21 February 2018 - 01:29 PM

A new interesting paper answering the question "What is the effect of a healthy low-fat (HLF) diet vs a healthy low-carbohydrate (HLC) diet on weight change at 12 months and are these effects related to genotype pattern or insulin secretion?" and finding that "There was no significant difference in 12-month weight loss between the HLF and HLC diets, and neither genotype pattern nor baseline insulin secretion was associated with the dietary effects on weight loss."

 

Gardner CD, Trepanowski JF, Del Gobbo LC, Hauser ME, Rigdon J, Ioannidis JPA, Desai M, King AC. Effect of Low-Fat vs Low-Carbohydrate Diet on 12-Month Weight Loss in Overweight Adults and the Association With Genotype Pattern or Insulin SecretionThe DIETFITS Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA. 2018;319(7):667–679.



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#184 albedo

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 03:18 PM

Wang, D. D., & Hu, F. B. (2018). Precision nutrition for prevention and management of type 2 diabetes. The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology. doi:10.1016/s2213-8587(18)30037-8

 

Precision nutrition aims to prevent and manage chronic diseases by tailoring dietary interventions or recommendations to one or a combination of an individual's genetic background, metabolic profile, and environmental exposures. Recent advances in genomics, metabolomics, and gut microbiome technologies have offered opportunities as well as challenges in the use of precision nutrition to prevent and manage type 2 diabetes. Nutrigenomics studies have identified genetic variants that influence intake and metabolism of specific nutrients and predict individuals' variability in response to dietary interventions. Metabolomics has revealed metabolomic fingerprints of food and nutrient consumption and uncovered new metabolic pathways that are potentially modified by diet. Dietary interventions have been successful in altering abundance, composition, and activity of gut microbiota that are relevant for food metabolism and glycaemic control. In addition, mobile apps and wearable devices facilitate real-time assessment of dietary intake and provide feedback which can improve glycaemic control and diabetes management. By integrating these technologies with big data analytics, precision nutrition has the potential to provide personalised nutrition guidance for more effective prevention and management of type 2 diabetes. Despite these technological advances, much research is needed before precision nutrition can be widely used in clinical and public health settings. Currently, the field of precision nutrition faces challenges including a lack of robust and reproducible results, the high cost of omics technologies, and methodological issues in study design as well as high-dimensional data analyses and interpretation. Evidence is needed to support the efficacy, cost-effectiveness, and additional benefits of precision nutrition beyond traditional nutrition intervention approaches. Therefore, we should manage unrealistically high expectations and balance the emerging field of precision nutrition with public health nutrition strategies to improve diet quality and prevent type 2 diabetes and its complications.

 


Edited by albedo, 27 February 2018 - 03:20 PM.


#185 albedo

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Posted 13 March 2018 - 07:25 PM

A short special NUTRA ingredients edition on Personalized Nutrition and Digital Health which I thought to log in this thread. Maybe you find something interesting.



#186 albedo

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Posted 14 March 2018 - 03:23 PM

Good short video by Dr Rhonda Patrick on Vitamin D sweet spot for health maintenance, impact on aging and cancer and telomere length:

 



#187 albedo

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Posted 28 March 2018 - 02:42 PM

I went thought the above video of Dr. Rhonda Patrick. If you register to her site you can download a convenient transcript with the references listed and additional information. Recommended.

 

I thought convenient to resume here the genes, the SNPs and the influenced nutrients/markers/risks she discussed:

 

MTHFR (rs1801133, rs1801131) --> folate, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, choline

FADS2 (rs1535) --> alpha linolenic acid (ALA) to anti-inflammatory eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) fatty acid conversion

FADS1 (rs174537, rs174548) --> arachidonic acid (AA) pro-inflammatory fatty acid level, LDL "bad" cholesterol , phosphatidylcholine

FUT2 (rs602662, rs492602) --> vitamin B12

APOE (rs429358, rs7412, rs429358) --> cholesterol, Alzheimer’s disease risk

FOXO3 (rs2802292) --> longevity

NBPF3 (rs4654748) --> vitamin B6

BCMO1 (rs7501331, rs12934922) --> beta-carotene to retinol conversion (vitamin A)

PEMT (rs7946) --> phosphatidylcholine

CYP2R1 (rs10741657, rs12794714, rs2060793) --> vitamin D levels

 

Also in FADS1 and mostly for those (as me) being homozygous in the minor allele C of FADS1 rs174547 (not included in the quoted text), the ratio EPA/AA should be watched. "...The minor allele of the FADS1 rs174547 polymorphism is associated with age-related decreases in the EPA/AA ratio and increases in ba-PWV among overweight subjects...." (ba-PWV measures arterial stiffness):

 

Kim M, Kim M, Yoo HJ, Lee A, Jeong S, Lee JH. Associations among FADS1 rs174547, eicosapentaenoic acid/arachidonic acid ratio, and arterial stiffness in overweight subjects. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2018;130:11-18.

 

(edit=spelling)


Edited by albedo, 28 March 2018 - 02:45 PM.


#188 albedo

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Posted 04 April 2018 - 01:59 PM

Interesting results on non-diabetics looking at NALP3 (component of inflammasome, modulating inflammation cascade, see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NALP3)and impact of Mediterranean and low-fat diets on glucose homeostasis (bold mine):

 

"...Non-diabetic CT+TT carriers of the rs4612666 SNP and AG+AA carriers of the rs10733113 SNP increased insulin sensitivity index (ISI) after three years of dietary intervention, whereas no effect was observed in diabetic patients..."

 

"...Our results show that the benefits associated with a Mediterranean diet regarding glucose homeostasis in non-T2DM patients depend on genetic variation in the inflammasome...."

 

Roncero-ramos I, Rangel-zuñiga OA, López-moreno J, et al. Mediterranean Diet, Glucose Homeostasis and Inflammasome Genetic Variants: The CORDIOPREV Study. Mol Nutr Food Res. 2018;:e1700960.

 



#189 albedo

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Posted 27 May 2018 - 09:24 AM

Stover PJ, James WPT, Krook A, Garza C. Emerging concepts on the role of epigenetics in the relationships between nutrition and health. J Intern Med. 2018

 

"Understanding the physiological and metabolic underpinnings that confer individual differences in responses to diet and diet-related chronic disease is essential to advance the field of nutrition. This includes elucidating the differences in gene expression that are mediated through programming of the genome through epigenetic chromatin modifications. Epigenetic landscapes are influenced by age, genetics, toxins and other environmental factors, including dietary exposures and nutritional status. Epigenetic modifications influence transcription and genome stability are established during development with life-long consequences. They can be inherited from one generation to the next. The covalent modifications of chromatin, which include methylation and acetylation, on DNA nucleotide bases, histone proteins and RNA are derived from intermediates of one-carbon metabolism and central metabolism. They influence key physiological processes throughout life, and together with inherited DNA primary sequence, contribute to responsiveness to environmental stresses, diet and risk for age-related chronic disease. Revealing diet-epigenetic relationships has the potential to transform nutrition science by increasing our fundamental understanding of: (i) the role of nutrients in biological systems, (ii) the resilience of living organisms in responding to environmental perturbations, and (iii) the development of dietary patterns that programme physiology for life-long health. Epigenetics may also enable the classification of individuals with chronic disease for specific dietary management and/or for efficacious diet-pharmaceutical combination therapies. These new emerging concepts at the interface of nutrition and epigenetics were discussed, and future research needs identified by leading experts at the 26th Marabou Symposium entitled 'Nutrition, Epigenetics, Genetics: Impact on Health and Disease'. For a compilation of the general discussion at the marabou symposium, click here http://www.marabousymposium.org/."



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#190 albedo

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Posted 30 May 2018 - 07:40 AM

Interesting finding by APBT of a new company (GeneFood) in nutrigenomics.

 

https://www.mygenefood.com/about/

 

Their Nutrigenomics Report seems to be sold out. The web site is good progress with a good list of genes to watch and a science score. Wonder about cost of the report but they might fund with the supplement they sell. Will see .....


Edited by albedo, 30 May 2018 - 08:08 AM.


#191 albedo

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Posted 07 June 2018 - 07:22 AM

Interesting study on the SNP MTHFR 677C→T modulation of homocysteine using supplementation with B-vitamins.

 

MTHFR 677C → T genotype modulates the effect of a 5-year supplementation with B-vitamins on homocysteine concentration: The SU.FOL.OM3 randomized controlled trial.
 

"...Participants with the TT genotype exhibited a lower 5-year decrease in tHcy concentrations following a B-vitamin supplementation than did participants with the CC or CT genotype..."

 

 



#192 albedo

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Posted 01 July 2018 - 04:49 PM

In case you missed this opinion and you are interested, mainly for those APOE4:

 

Diet Can Trump the Alzheimer’s Gene ApoE

https://nutritionfac...mers-gene-apoe/

 



#193 albedo

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Posted 04 October 2018 - 12:09 PM

Very interesting:

 

Westerman K, Reaver A, Roy C, et al. Longitudinal analysis of biomarker data from a personalized nutrition platform in healthy subjects. Sci Rep. 2018;8(1):14685.

 

"The trend toward personalized approaches to health and medicine has resulted in a need to collect high-dimensional datasets on individuals from a wide variety of populations, in order to generate customized intervention strategies. However, it is not always clear whether insights derived from studies in patient populations or in controlled trial settings are transferable to individuals in the general population. To address this issue, a longitudinal analysis was conducted on blood biomarker data from 1032 generally healthy individuals who used an automated, web-based personalized nutrition and lifestyle platform. The study had two main aims: to analyze correlations between biomarkers for biological insights, and to characterize the effectiveness of the platform in improving biomarker levels. First, a biomarker correlation network was constructed to generate biological hypotheses that are relevant to researchers and, potentially, to users of personalized wellness tools. The correlation network revealed expected patterns, such as the established relationships between blood lipid levels, as well as novel insights, such as a connection between neutrophil and triglyceride concentrations that has been suggested as a relevant indicator of cardiovascular risk. Next, biomarker changes during platform use were assessed, showing a trend toward normalcy for most biomarkers in those participants whose values were out of the clinically normal range at baseline. Finally, associations were found between the selection of specific interventions and corresponding biomarker changes, suggesting directions for future study."



#194 albedo

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Posted 16 November 2018 - 04:26 PM

Insightful study, trying to meet some of the authors. Comments/questions?

 

"Dietary interventions to manipulate the human gut microbiome for improved health have received increasing attention. However, their design has been limited by a lack of understanding of the quantitative impact of diet on a host's microbiota. We present a highly controlled diet perturbation experiment in a healthy, human cohort in which individual micronutrients are spiked in against a standardized background. We identify strong and predictable responses of specific microbes across participants consuming prebiotic spike-ins, at the level of both strains and functional genes, suggesting fine-scale resource partitioning in the human gut. No predictable responses to non-prebiotic micronutrients were found. Surprisingly, we did not observe decreases in day-to-day variability of the microbiota compared to a complex, varying diet, and instead found evidence of diet-induced stress and an associated loss of biodiversity. Our data offer insights into the effect of a low complexity diet on the gut microbiome, and suggest that effective personalized dietary interventions will rely on functional, strain-level characterization of a patient's microbiota."

 

Gurry T, Gibbons SM, Nguyen LTT, et al. Predictability and persistence of prebiotic dietary supplementation in a healthy human cohort. Sci Rep. 2018;8(1):12699.



#195 albedo

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Posted 31 December 2018 - 11:33 AM

A bit dated (2016) but good review and lot or references. I liked in particular Sect 3 on "Genetics and epigenetics of nutrition in aging":

 

Dato S, Bellizzi D, Rose G, Passarino G. The impact of nutrients on the aging rate: A complex interaction of demographic, environmental and genetic factors. Mech Ageing Dev. 2016;154:49-61.

https://www.scienced...47637416300082



#196 albedo

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Posted 09 January 2019 - 03:48 PM

Personalized nutrition company Persona opens portal for health care practitioners

 

https://www.nutraing...paign=copyright



#197 albedo

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Posted 09 January 2019 - 03:55 PM

Regarding the SNPs CYP2R1 (rs12794714, rs10741657) and DHCR7/NADSYN1 (rs12785878, rs11234027) ...

 

Aspelund T, Grübler MR, Smith AV, et al. Effect of Genetically Low 25-Hydroxyvitamin D on Mortality Risk: Mendelian Randomization Analysis in 3 Large European Cohorts. Nutrients. 2019;11(1)

https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/30609725

 

"...In conclusion, the results of this MR study in a combined sample from three European cohort studies provide further support for a causal relationship between vitamin D deficiency and increased all-cause mortality...."



#198 albedo

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Posted 24 March 2019 - 10:55 AM

I wonder if anyone has experience with Dr. Valter Longo's company L-Nutra using fast mimicking diet (FMD).

 

They are "...developing a pipeline of FMD® based meal programs and will pursue FDA approval for claims related to preventing, delaying or helping to support management of chronic diseases, including metabolic syndrome, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s, multiple sclerosis, and other autoimmune diseases..."

 

In particular their "ProLon" product:

 

" ...L-Nutra’s first FMD® is a 5-day meal program to be consumed every 1 to 6 months based on an authorized healthcare professional’s recommendation.  ProLon®, is designed to promote the body’s natural ability to protect, regenerate and rejuvenate. In clinical studies, ProLon® has been shown to reduce abdominal fat and maintain healthy levels of blood glucose, C-reactive protein (CRP), and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). Unpublished clinical trials indicate that ProLon® may have other positive health benefits...."

 



#199 tunt01

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Posted 24 March 2019 - 06:35 PM

 

I wonder if anyone has experience with Dr. Valter Longo's company L-Nutra using fast mimicking diet (FMD).

 

 

I contacted them 2 years ago asking for information.  They wanted me to do a 3 minute telemedicine interview with a registered dietician, I think as some kind of screening process before sending any ProLon product.  I didn't want to talk to them and just told them it was for a family member and I would implement the FMD myself (vegetables, nuts).  

 

I just ordered some of their https://fastbar.com/, which doesn't seem like anything special other than its more healthy looking and has inulin (stimulates bifdobacterium). 

 

Not sure if that does anything for you, but it's my 2 cents.


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#200 Benko

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Posted 25 March 2019 - 02:50 AM

 

I wonder if anyone has experience with Dr. Valter Longo's company L-Nutra using fast mimicking diet (FMD).

 


 

 

I just met a dentist who had done 4 prolon FMD kits ( I believe one kit every three months).  He had kept labs before and after and he showed progressive improvements in fasting blood sugar, HB A1C, CRP, and weight over the course of doing the 4 kits.  He was very meticulous and kept his "gains".

 

I've just ordered a kit for myself, and they no longer require you to speak to them before you order.

 

An order of their bars just arrived and it tasted kinda sweet, like one of the sweeter flavor kind bars. 


Edited by Benko, 25 March 2019 - 02:57 AM.

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#201 albedo

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Posted 25 March 2019 - 09:46 PM

@tunt01 and @benko

 

Thank you for your replies. The progress claimed on a1c and blood glucose is very interesting. Should you find something more on these it would be great. It is mainly for a family member i would like to suggest to try.

 

In this interview (by Rhonda Patrick) Valter Longo talks also about biomarkers of biological age in particular Levine's Phenotypic Age clock (e.g. see on the Biological Age thread here) which I used myself on my data, based on common clinical biomarkers, so that could be an easy and good way to check if his L-Nutra Fast Mimiking Diet is likely to work or not on the person.

 

https://www.foundmyf...o-2?t=00h56m01s


Edited by albedo, 25 March 2019 - 10:04 PM.


#202 albedo

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Posted 24 April 2019 - 11:31 AM

Will see what will come out of this but understand BASF has positioned strongly in this area:

 

BASF and InsideTracker Take Leading Steps to Advance Personalized Nutrition

https://www.basf.com...9/p-17-309.html

 

Nice paper by David Sinclair's team using InsideTracker. Anyone using this tool for personalized nutrition?

Westerman K, Reaver A, Roy C, et al. Longitudinal analysis of biomarker data from a personalized nutrition platform in healthy subjects. Sci Rep. 2018;8(1):14685.

 

"The trend toward personalized approaches to health and medicine has resulted in a need to collect high-dimensional datasets on individuals from a wide variety of populations, in order to generate customized intervention strategies. However, it is not always clear whether insights derived from studies in patient populations or in controlled trial settings are transferable to individuals in the general population. To address this issue, a longitudinal analysis was conducted on blood biomarker data from 1032 generally healthy individuals who used an automated, web-based personalized nutrition and lifestyle platform. The study had two main aims: to analyze correlations between biomarkers for biological insights, and to characterize the effectiveness of the platform in improving biomarker levels. First, a biomarker correlation network was constructed to generate biological hypotheses that are relevant to researchers and, potentially, to users of personalized wellness tools. The correlation network revealed expected patterns, such as the established relationships between blood lipid levels, as well as novel insights, such as a connection between neutrophil and triglyceride concentrations that has been suggested as a relevant indicator of cardiovascular risk. Next, biomarker changes during platform use were assessed, showing a trend toward normalcy for most biomarkers in those participants whose values were out of the clinically normal range at baseline. Finally, associations were found between the selection of specific interventions and corresponding biomarker changes, suggesting directions for future study."

 



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#203 albedo

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Posted 14 May 2019 - 10:10 PM

Impressive paper (2012) from Prof. Michael Snyder et al. (Stanford) actually analyzing by iPOP (integrative Personal Omics Profiling) his own data set during health and disease periods of time. It gives a good idea where the future of medicine (and possibly nutrition) might be heading. I also report a talk he gave last November in Switzerland on his work. On nutrition he mentioned (about 1:25:25 and on) they are testing lot of supplements on about 100 people but results are not ready yet:

 

Chen R, Mias GI, Li-pook-than J, et al. Personal omics profiling reveals dynamic molecular and medical phenotypes. Cell. 2012;148(6):1293-307.

https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/22424236

 

Personal Omics

https://mediaserver....e.ch/play/97787

 

A pretty mind blowing follow on on the iPOP cohort. A sneak peek into the possible future of medicine when costs will go down and this approach becomes mainstream for all:

Schüssler-fiorenza rose SM, Contrepois K, Moneghetti KJ, et al. A longitudinal big data approach for precision health. Nat Med. 2019;25(5):792-804.

 

"Precision health relies on the ability to assess disease risk at an individual level, detect early preclinical conditions and initiate preventive strategies. Recent technological advances in omics and wearable monitoring enable deep molecular and physiological profiling and may provide important tools for precision health. We explored the ability of deep longitudinal profiling to make health-related discoveries, identify clinically relevant molecular pathways and affect behavior in a prospective longitudinal cohort (n = 109) enriched for risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The cohort underwent integrative personalized omics profiling from samples collected quarterly for up to 8 years (median, 2.8 years) using clinical measures and emerging technologies including genome, immunome, transcriptome, proteome, metabolome, microbiome and wearable monitoring. We discovered more than 67 clinically actionable health discoveries and identified multiple molecular pathways associated with metabolic, cardiovascular and oncologic pathophysiology. We developed prediction models for insulin resistance by using omics measurements, illustrating their potential to replace burdensome tests. Finally, study participation led the majority of participants to implement diet and exercise changes. Altogether, we conclude that deep longitudinal profiling can lead to actionable health discoveries and provide relevant information for precision health."

 

Attached File  ipop 2019.PNG   164.93KB   0 downloads


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#204 albedo

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Posted 02 June 2019 - 11:31 AM

A nice recent review and description of challenges ahead:

 

Andraos S, Wake M, Saffery R, Burgner D, Kussmann M, O'sullivan J. Perspective: Advancing Understanding of Population Nutrient-Health Relations via Metabolomics and Precision Phenotypes. Adv Nutr. 2019

 

"Diet and lifestyle are vital to population health, but their true contribution is difficult to quantify using traditional methods. Nutrient–health relations are typically based on epidemiological associations that are assessed at the population level, traditionally using self-reported dietary and lifestyle data. Unfortunately, such measures are inherently inaccurate. New technologies such as metabolomics can measure nutritional and micronutrient profiles in body fluids, providing objective evaluation of nutritional status. A critical step toward accurate health prediction models would be the building of integrated repositories of nutritional measures combining subjective methods of reporting with objective metabolomics profiles and precise phenotypic data. Here we outline a roadmap to achieve this goal and discuss both the advantages and risks of this approach. We also highlight the uncertain associations between the complexity of high-dimensional data generated in ‘omics research (along with the public confusion thismay engender) and the rapid adoption of ‘omics approaches by nutrition and health companies to develop nutritional products and services"



#205 albedo

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Posted 04 July 2019 - 11:37 AM

A nice follow-on development on the celebrated and quite impressive work by Segal at Weizmann I also mentioned previously in this thread:

Mendes-soares H, Raveh-sadka T, Azulay S, et al. Model of personalized postprandial glycemic response to food developed for an Israeli cohort predicts responses in Midwestern American individuals. Am J Clin Nutr. 2019;



#206 albedo

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Posted 22 October 2019 - 08:04 AM

A short report from the last week meeting in London:

https://www.nutraing...hAonWPpoz5&p2=#



#207 albedo

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Posted 25 October 2019 - 08:50 AM

Maybe not really directly related to personalized nutrition but I wonder if you ever tried products such as Huel or similar. The pleasure and the social aspects of eating is maybe not there but I am tempted to try.

 

https://uk.huel.com/products/huel



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#208 albedo

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Posted 10 November 2019 - 08:28 PM

Interesting video by Dr Greger on microbiota enterotype where "There appear to be just two types of people in the world: those who have mostly Bacteroides type bacteria in their gut, and those whose colons are overwhelmingly home to Prevotella species instead."

https://nutritionfac..._eid=f56b67bcfa

 

 







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