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Personalized Nutrition

personalized nutrition personalized medicine nutrigenomics nutrigenetics

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232 replies to this topic

#211 Zed

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Posted 24 February 2020 - 01:00 PM

albedo  Do you have a review on InsideTracker.?

#212 albedo

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Posted 24 February 2020 - 04:47 PM

albedo  Do you have a review on InsideTracker.?

No I do not but think it is a step in the right direction.

 



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#213 albedo

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Posted 11 March 2020 - 12:30 PM

Floris M, Cano A, Porru L, et al. Direct-to-Consumer Nutrigenetics Testing: An Overview. Nutrients. 2020;12(2)

 

"At present, specialized companies offering genetic testing services without the involvement of clinicians are growing; this development is a direct consequence of the significant decrease in genotyping and sequencing costs. Online companies offer predictions about the risk of developing complex diseases during one's life course, and they offer suggestions for personal lifestyle. Several companies have been created that provide nutrigenetics services; these companies suggest dietary indications-a central issue in the prevention and etiopathogenesis of specific diseases-based on one's personal genetic background. Dietary patterns are defined on the basis of a limited set of genetic markers. In this article, we analyze the online nutrigenetics services offered by 45 companies worldwide, to obtain an overall picture of the costs, the types of nutritional traits considered and the level of scientific precision of the services proposed. Our analysis clearly highlights the need for specific guidelines, in order to ensure a set of minimum quality standards for the nutrigenetics services offered to the customer."



#214 albedo

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Posted 10 April 2020 - 11:11 AM

"Our study shows that nutrient-sensing pathways play an important role in memory and suggests that the ABTB1 and GRB10 genes are likely molecular links for the association between diet, the ageing of neural stem cells and our memory ability. Identifying these genes as the missing links between these three important variables could inform new approaches to help improve the ageing process through targeted changes in diet and exercise and ultimately in developing new drugs in the future."

https://snip.ly/rd87...-age-genes.html



#215 albedo

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Posted 13 April 2020 - 11:00 AM

A short review:

Abrahams M.& Matusheski N.V. (2020) Personalised nutrition technologies: a new paradigm for dietetic practice and training in a digital transformation era. J Hum Nutr Diet.
https://doi.org/10.1111/jhn.12746

Attached File  PN.PNG   53.85KB   0 downloads



#216 albedo

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Posted 15 April 2020 - 11:27 AM

Very good in depth compilation of genes and SNPs affecting eating preferences and diseases.

 

Vesnina A, Prosekov A, Kozlova O, Atuchin V. Genes and Eating Preferences, Their Roles in Personalized Nutrition. Genes (Basel). 2020;11(4)

 

At present, personalized diets, which take into account consumer genetic characteristics, are growing popular. Nutrigenetics studies the effect of gene variations on metabolism and nutrigenomics, which branches off further and investigates how nutrients and food compounds affect genes. This work deals with the mutations affecting the assimilation of metabolites, contributing to nutrigenetic studies. We searched for the genes responsible for eating preferences which allow for the tailoring of personalized diets. Presently, genetic nutrition is growing in demand, as it contributes to the prevention and/or rehabilitation of non-communicable diseases, both monogenic and polygenic. In this work, we showed single-nucleotide polymorphisms in genes-missense mutations that change the functions of coded proteins, resulting in a particular eating preferences or a disease. We studied the genes influencing food preferences-particularly those responsible for fats and carbohydrates absorption, food intolerance, metabolism of vitamins, taste sensations, oxidation of xenobiotics, eating preferences and food addiction. As a result, 34 genes were identified that affect eating preferences. Significant shortcomings were found in the methods/programs for developing personalized diets that are used today, and the weaknesses were revealed in the development of nutrigenetics (inconsistency of data on SNP genes, ignoring population genetics data, difficult information to understand consumer, etc.). Taking into account all the shortcomings, an approximate model was proposed in the review for selecting an appropriate personalized diet. In the future, it is planned to develop the proposed model for the compilation of individual diets.



#217 albedo

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Posted 21 May 2020 - 08:28 PM

Prepared by the Personalized Nutrition & COVID-19 Task Force of the American Nutrition Association

https://theana.org/COVID-19


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#218 albedo

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Posted 08 June 2020 - 10:10 AM

Interesting, on Tim Spector's "Predict" study, waiting for the publication in Nature Medicine:

 

https://www.nutraing...ign=08-Jun-2020

 

 



#219 albedo

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Posted 14 June 2020 - 09:34 AM

Interesting, on Tim Spector's "Predict" study, waiting for the publication in Nature Medicine:

 

https://www.nutraing...ign=08-Jun-2020

 

Now published:

 

"Metabolic responses to food influence risk of cardiometabolic disease, but large-scale high-resolution studies are lacking. We recruited n = 1,002 twins and unrelated healthy adults in the United Kingdom to the PREDICT 1 study and assessed postprandial metabolic responses in a clinical setting and at home. We observed large inter-individual variability (as measured by the population coefficient of variation (s.d./mean, %)) in postprandial responses of blood triglyceride (103%), glucose (68%) and insulin (59%) following identical meals. Person-specific factors, such as gut microbiome, had a greater influence (7.1% of variance) than did meal macronutrients (3.6%) for postprandial lipemia, but not for postprandial glycemia (6.0% and 15.4%, respectively); genetic variants had a modest impact on predictions (9.5% for glucose, 0.8% for triglyceride, 0.2% for C-peptide). Findings were independently validated in a US cohort (n = 100 people). We developed a machine-learning model that predicted both triglyceride (r = 0.47) and glycemic (r = 0.77) responses to food intake. These findings may be informative for developing personalized diet strategies"

https://www.nature.c...1591-020-0934-0



#220 Amira L.

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 02:52 PM

Wow! What a difference! It's exciting to have the power to make such an impact only utilizing dietary interventions.

 

 

 

For anyone with a chronic condition being disappointed from the outcomes with standard medicine, and therefore already exploring nutrient-epigenetic options, the future is already here.

 

 

 

With standard protocols (low fat/low cholesterol diet, exercise, and lipid lowering agents) 1 in 3 patients experiences a new adverse event within 5 years.

 

With Nutrigenomic-based dietary interventions (reduction of grains, real food, individualized supplementation) only about 1 in 60 patients experiences a new adverse event within 9 years.

 


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#221 albedo

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Posted 07 July 2020 - 10:39 AM

An opinion I feel to share:

Opinion: Why we need precision nutrition now

by Patrick J. Stover, Ph.D.

https://agrilifetoda...-nutrition-now/



#222 albedo

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 07:45 AM

Two interesting genes to look at in terms of more or less cholesterol absorption and regulation:

 

"...The function of ABCG5 and ABCG8 (along with LXR) genes are supposed to help kick sterols that do get absorbed out of the wall of the gut (the lumen) and back into the intestine where we can get rid of them in our stool (also how we rid the body of excess cholesterol)..."

 

"...Some absorb only 25% of the cholesterol they eat, while others absorb as much as 80%..."

 

https://www.mygenefo...my-cholesterol/



#223 albedo

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Posted 20 August 2020 - 08:13 AM

I continued looking at magnesium as in my previous posts here and here

 

I went through a nice GWAS study (see reference below) which I liked because:

  • It is based on a large cohort
  • It is also reproduced in a different, equally large cohort
  • It looks at both associative and causative effects in magnesium metabolism and transportation (Table 2 and 4)
  • It looks at hypomagnesia but also at the physiologically associated estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), fasting glucose, and bone mineral density (Table 3)

I checked all the quoted SNPs. Should you have the same patience and myself not being a geneticist maybe you can critic my conclusion:

 

I paid attention mainly to my causative and associative SNPs for which I am homozygous in the trouble making alleles presenting commonly or rarely:

  • Associative (common): rs11144134 (in the TRPM6) is quite common and has the largest effect on the magnesium serum level; I am homozygous in the coded allele which is inversely associated to magnesium level (Table 2). The study reconfirms the known effect of TRPM6 polymorphisms already mentioned in my previous post in relation to diabetes risk
  • Causative (common): rs848305, rs17251221, rs11569033 (Table 4)
  • Causative (rare) for rs948100 in FXYD2 (Table 4)
  • Associative (common): rs6746896, rs994430, rs4714146, rs2490281, rs3740393, rs11115332, rs2463021, rs4778439 and rs4778439 (Table 4)

While not homozygous, I do carry 3 other magnesium inversely associated alleles (rs3925584, rs448378 and rs4561213 in Table 2)

 

Bottom line: I can explain genetically, at least partially, my difficulties with magnesium absorption and the necessity for me to monitor serum levels and supplement with bioavailable forms as appropriate.

 

Reference

Genome-wide association studies of serum magnesium, potassium, and sodium concentrations identify six Loci influencing serum magnesium levels.

"Magnesium, potassium, and sodium, cations commonly measured in serum, are involved in many physiological processes including energy metabolism, nerve and muscle function, signal transduction, and fluid and blood pressure regulation. To evaluate the contribution of common genetic variation to normal physiologic variation in serum concentrations of these cations, we conducted genome-wide association studies of serum magnesium, potassium, and sodium concentrations using approximately 2.5 million genotyped and imputed common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 15,366 participants of European descent from the international CHARGE Consortium. Study-specific results were combined using fixed-effects inverse-variance weighted meta-analysis. SNPs demonstrating genome-wide significant (p<5 x 10(-8)) or suggestive associations (p<4 x 10(-7)) were evaluated for replication in an additional 8,463 subjects of European descent. The association of common variants at six genomic regions (in or near MUC1, ATP2B1, DCDC5, TRPM6, SHROOM3, and MDS1) with serum magnesium levels was genome-wide significant when meta-analyzed with the replication dataset. All initially significant SNPs from the CHARGE Consortium showed nominal association with clinically defined hypomagnesemia, two showed association with kidney function, two with bone mineral density, and one of these also associated with fasting glucose levels. Common variants in CNNM2, a magnesium transporter studied only in model systems to date, as well as in CNNM3 and CNNM4, were also associated with magnesium concentrations in this study. We observed no associations with serum sodium or potassium levels exceeding p<4 x 10(-7). Follow-up studies of newly implicated genomic loci may provide additional insights into the regulation and homeostasis of human serum magnesium levels."

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/20700443

 

Still continuing to research on this. I pop into this comprehensive study which features a clinical focus and suggests possible symptoms of low magnesium status of genetic origin. Fig. 2 is particularly insightful listing the genes you can look at:

 

Viering DHHM, de Baaij JHF, Walsh SB, Kleta R, Bockenhauer D. Genetic causes of hypomagnesemia, a clinical overview. Pediatr Nephrol. 2017;32(7):1123-1135. doi:10.1007/s00467-016-3416-3

 

Attached File  MG.PNG   249.27KB   1 downloads

 



#224 albedo

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Posted 22 August 2020 - 08:12 AM

"...At the core of the patented process is the recommendation engine that takes customer’s inputs—blood nutrient levels obtained from an at-home testing device, anthropometric and lifestyle data, and health goals—and turns it into precise nutrient recommendations, which can be fulfilled through targeted supplemental nutrients and nutrient-dense food options..."

https://www.baze.com...ient-precision/



#225 albedo

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Posted 09 October 2020 - 05:00 PM

Based also on EFSA European Food Safety Authority:

"In conclusion, this report considers the potential influence of the 10 essential nutrients, considered critical by the EFSA for the proper functioning of the immune system, by reviewing their potential preventive or other eects against COVID-19. In this context, it is worth noting that the countries with the worst intake profile for these micronutrients correspond to those that have received the cruelest blow from the COVID-19 pandemic. The results of this ecological study show that the suboptimal consumption of Vitamin D, Vitamin C, Vitamin B12, and iron is correlated with either COVID-19 incidence or mortality indicators. Moreover, the scientific evidence accumulated to date highlights the relevance of the optimal status of the 10 nutrients but, above all, it underlines the importance of Vitamin D and iron for the immune system as well as for the prevention and fight against COVID-19. Thus, the body of evidence suggests conducting epidemiological scientific studies, intervention studies, and/or in vitro approaches in order to establish and characterize the benefits of Vitamin D and iron (or even their combination) against COVID-19. In addition, genetic factors that predispose their carrier to a suboptimal nutritional status for these specific nutrients must be taken into consideration. The analysis of genetic variants associated with lower bioavailability (or lower circulating levels) of essential micronutrients for the optimal functioning of the immune system emerges as a potential and useful tool to detect population groups predisposed to suboptimal phenotypes. Therefore, the detection of individuals with a high genetic risk of showing low levels of specific nutrients would enable the preventive application of personalized nutritional guidelines to promote, in the first instance, individual health, and, as such, improve population health. Thus, both suboptimal intake and genetic risk of suboptimal status should be screened, and consequent nutrigenetic strategies must be put in place to help individuals to reach an optimal nutritional state and, consequently, improve the whole population’s immunity to face this pandemic." (red mine)

https://www.mdpi.com...-6643/12/9/2738



#226 albedo

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Posted 15 October 2020 - 03:23 PM

I posted this on a nutrition-cancer thread but it is basically "personalized nutrition" topic too:

https://www.longecit...ndpost&p=899274



#227 albedo

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Posted 15 November 2020 - 04:29 PM

An interesting read also in the frame of the pandemic:

 

"Sustaining adequate nutritional needs of a population is a challenging task in normal times and a-priori in times of crisis. There is no "one size fits all" solution that addresses nutrition. In relevance to the COVID-19 pandemic crisis, viral infections in general and RNA viruses in particular, are known to induce and promote oxidative stress, consequently increasing and draining the body's demand for micronutrients, especially those related to antioxidant enzymatic systems, thus hindering the human body's ability to cope optimally with oxidative stress. Common polymorphisms in major antioxidant enzymes, with world population minor allele frequencies ranging from 0.5% to 50%, are related to altered enzymatic function, with substantial potential effects on the body's ability to cope with viral infection-induced oxidative stress. In this review we highlight common SNPs of the major antioxidant enzymes relevant to nutritional components in the context of viral infections, namely: superoxide dismutases, glutathione peroxidases and catalase. We delineate functional polymorphisms in several human antioxidant enzymes that require, especially during viral crisis, adequate and potentially additional nutritional support to cope with the disease pathological consequences. Thus, in face of the COVID-19 pandemic, nutrition should be tightly monitored and possibly supplemented, with special attention to those carrying common polymorphisms in antioxidant enzymes." (bold mine)

https://doi.org/10.1...954422420000244

 


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#228 albedo

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Posted 03 December 2020 - 08:18 PM

Here I found particularly good the refresh on complex concepts helping in further reading literature and interpreting results. Liked also the practical Table 2:

 

Mullins VA, Bresette W, Johnstone L, Hallmark B, Chilton FH. Genomics in Personalized Nutrition: Can You "Eat for Your Genes"?. Nutrients. 2020;12(10):3118. Published 2020 Oct 13. doi:10.3390/nu12103118

https://www.ncbi.nlm...#__ffn_sectitle

 

"We review important issues such as dietary exposure and genetic architecture addressing the concepts of penetrance, pleiotropy, epistasis, polygenicity, and epigenetics. More specifically, we discuss how they complicate using genotypic data to predict phenotypes as well as response to dietary interventions. Then, several examples (including caffeine sensitivity, alcohol dependence, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, obesity/appetite, cardiovascular, Alzheimer’s disease, folate metabolism, long-chain fatty acid biosynthesis, and vitamin D metabolism) are provided illustrating how genotypic information could be used to inform nutritional recommendations."

 

Attached File  SNPs.PNG   58.93KB   0 downloads

 



#229 albedo

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Posted 12 January 2021 - 05:14 PM

For those of us carrying the genotype MTHFR C677T and MTHFR A1298C this can be interesting:

https://mailchi.mp/9...an?e=68ef64b891



#230 albedo

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Posted 13 January 2021 - 04:51 PM

albedo  Do you have a review on InsideTracker.?

 

No review yet but it looks like they are progressing nicely (could not find a more readable image of this poster):

Attached File  PN Segterra.jpg   93.67KB   0 downloads
 



#231 albedo

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Posted 27 February 2021 - 05:22 PM

Chilton FH, Dutta R, Reynolds LM, Sergeant S, Mathias RA, Seeds MC. Precision Nutrition and Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: A Case for Personalized Supplementation Approaches for the Prevention and Management of Human Diseases. Nutrients. 2017;9(11):1165. Published 2017 Oct 25. doi:10.3390/nu9111165

 

"...Consequently, we believe it is safe to say that a reduction in the dietary intake of LA and ARA, together with an increase in n-3 LC-PUFAs would benefit most individuals. However, the fact that there are such individual- and population-based genetic differences in the metabolism of dietary 18C-PUFAs, resulting in high, intermediate, and low blood levels of n-6 and n-3 LC-PUFAs and LC-PUFA metabolites, suggests that some populations and individuals will respond to n-3 LC-PUFA supplementation better than others...."



#232 albedo

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Posted 28 February 2021 - 12:09 PM

Interesting and filling much needed gaps:

 

Martin RL. Gene-centric database reveals environmental and lifestyle relationships for potential risk modification and prevention. Lifestyle Genomics. 2021;14(1):30-36.

https://www.karger.c...FullText/512690

 

"The database at Nutrigenetics.net has been under development since 2007 to facilitate the identification and classification of PubMed articles relevant to human genetics. A controlled vocabulary (i.e., standardized terminology) is used to index these records, with links back to PubMed for every article title. This enables the display of indexes (alphabetical subtopic listings) for any given topic, or for any given combination of topics, including for genes and specific genetic variants. Stepwise use of such indexes (first for one topic, then for combinations of topics) can reveal relationships that are otherwise easily overlooked. These relationships include environmental and lifestyle variables with potential relevance to risk modification (both beneficial and detrimental), and to prevention, or at least to the potential delay of symptom onset for health conditions like Alzheimer disease among many others. Thirty-four specific genetic variants have each been mentioned in at least ≥1,000 PubMed titles/abstracts, and these numbers are steadily increasing. The benefits of indexing with standardized terminology are illustrated for genetic variants like MTHFR 677C-T and its various synonyms (e.g., rs1801133 or Ala222Val). Such use of a controlled vocabulary is also helpful for numerous health conditions, and for potential risk modifiers (i.e., potential risk/effect modifiers)."



#233 albedo

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Posted 20 April 2021 - 08:06 AM

Guiding Global Best Practice in Personalized Nutrition Based on Genetics: The Development of a Nutrigenomics Care Map

https://jandonline.o...0099-X/fulltext







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: personalized nutrition, personalized medicine, nutrigenomics, nutrigenetics

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