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Nilotinib Group Buy

nilotinib

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#271 LongLife

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Posted 03 May 2016 - 02:34 PM

LOGIC:

I will commit again. I received the N a week ago on Saturday, all went well. Thank you much for all your work at this project. I will scrape together for 200 grams. Let's see a kilo this time, okay?



#272 Logic

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Posted 03 May 2016 - 11:55 PM

LOGIC:

I will commit again. I received the N a week ago on Saturday, all went well. Thank you much for all your work at this project. I will scrape together for 200 grams. Let's see a kilo this time, okay?

 

You are of course welcome to order more, but please don't feel obliged to do so due to my inclination to reach a 1 kg target.

All the calculations are based on 500 grams and while the small saving in cost from buying 1kg (and the generous donations from some of the group buy members) are most welcome; the buy cost is covered and takes priority.

 

I started this buy to help a good friend of mine's mother and am doing this second buy due to the heartbreaking and totally unnecessary personal accounts I have read on facebook PD groups etc while trying to reach the 500 gram target of the 1st buy. 

I also want to build a good relationship with the supplier as my friend's mother will need more in around 6 months time.

 

(The donations help too and I have used some of those funds to become a full member here, enabling me to PM everyone without limitation.  My heartfelt thx to those who donated!   :) )


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#273 Logic

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 12:35 AM

Group Buy Round 1 Progress report:

 

Everyone, except Ceridwen, has received their Nilotinib, for research and development purposes...

 

There were 2 address queries and ...another issue with a 3rd parcel destined for an overseas address.

2 of these 3 parcels have now arrived, leaving 1 parcel, as yet, undelivered:

 

The lab has not yet posted Ceridwen's package as they : "...did not yet have confirmation of her address..." before their second trip to USPS.

ie: She responded to the address query a little late/after the lab's second trip to USPS.

(The query was due to her house having a name, rather than a street name and number)

 

USPS will collect packages for no extra charge, while delivering post.  A fact apparently unknown to the lab and untill recently, to myself:
https://tools.usps.c...on!input.action
I have just let the lab know this and offered to fill out the above linked form for them.

My apologies for the delay Ceridwen.  We do know where your package is.  That it's safe, and based on the fact that everyone else has received their package; you are all but guaranteed to receive yours without issue.

I will send you your tracking # as soon as I get it.

 

If anyone else has any issue whatsoever with their parcel, that I am unaware of, or suggestions to improve on the 2nd group buy; please post here.


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#274 Logic

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 11:25 PM

Nilotinib group buy. Round 2:
 
The 1st Nilotinib group buy went very well and a 2nd group buy started and progressed fast due to this and will in fact close on the 11th of this month.
http://www.longecity...ndpost&p=772441
 
This group buy began because Nilotinib was found to be miraculously effective in all participants, in a Phase 1 Parkinson's study:

“Before the nilotinib, I did almost nothing...Now, I empty the garbage, unload the dishwasher, load the washer and the dryer, set the table, even take responsibility for grilling...it’s life-changing...”
          Alan Hoffman.  Professor emeritus of social science education at Georgia State University
https://www.georgeto...sons-study.html
https://gumc.georget...e-in-Parkinsons

 
Nilotinib:
  • Clears toxic, misfolded proteins  from cells.
  • Prevents amyloid secretion into the extracellular space between neurons.
  • Facilitates the mitophagy of old, sickly mitochondria.
This means that Nilotinib "offers a unique and exciting strategy to treat neurodegenerative diseases that feature abnormal buildup of proteins" in:
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
  • Frontotemporal Dementia
  • Huntington's disease
  • Lewy body dementia
  • Etc
http://explore.georg.../news/?ID=70332
 
 
Also; Nilotinib reduces fibrosis in general:
  • Muscle fibrosis
  • Liver fibrosis
  • Kidney fibrosis

http://www.ncbi.nlm....act&holding=npg

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/21251937

http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC3148703/

http://www.abstracts...hp?nu=ERA10L_36

http://jasn.asnjourn.../22/8/1393.full

http://www.longecity...e-with-enzymes/

 
Cost:
  • Nilotinib after 3rd Party lab testing in the USA: $ 10.15 per gram. ($ 45.68 for 1 month supply @ 150 mg/day)
  • Postage in the USA: $ 6.80 
  • Postage outside the USA: https://postcalc.usps.com/
  • PayPal fees:

https://salecalc.com...a&r=4&m=0&c=0  

(Click 'To receive this' to get the full amount required for the purchase)

or

Use personal payments to avoid or reduce fees:

https://www.paypal.c...ay-fees-outside


Full details and discussion can be found here:
http://www.longecity...ndpost&p=765835

#275 Logic

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 11:42 PM

Nilotinib group buy. Round 2:
 
The 1st Nilotinib group buy went very well and a 2nd group buy started and progressed fast due to this and will in fact close on the 11th of this month.
http://www.longecity...ndpost&p=772441
 
This group buy began because Nilotinib was found to be miraculously effective in all participants, in a Phase 1 Parkinson's study:


“Before the nilotinib, I did almost nothing...Now, I empty the garbage, unload the dishwasher, load the washer and the dryer, set the table, even take responsibility for grilling...it’s life-changing...”
          Alan Hoffman.  Professor emeritus of social science education at Georgia State University
https://www.georgeto...sons-study.html
https://gumc.georget...e-in-Parkinsons

 
Nilotinib:

  • Clears toxic, misfolded proteins  from cells.
  • Prevents amyloid secretion into the extracellular space between neurons.
  • Facilitates the mitophagy of old, sickly mitochondria.

This means that Nilotinib "offers a unique and exciting strategy to treat neurodegenerative diseases that feature abnormal buildup of proteins" in:

  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
  • Frontotemporal Dementia
  • Huntington's disease
  • Lewy body dementia
  • Etc

http://explore.georg.../news/?ID=70332
 
 
Also; Nilotinib reduces fibrosis in general:

  • Muscle fibrosis
  • Liver fibrosis
  • Kidney fibrosis

http://www.ncbi.nlm....act&holding=npg

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/21251937

http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC3148703/

http://www.abstracts...hp?nu=ERA10L_36

http://jasn.asnjourn.../22/8/1393.full

http://www.longecity...e-with-enzymes/

 
Cost:

  • Nilotinib after 3rd Party lab testing in the USA: $ 10.15 per gram. ($ 45.68 for 1 month supply @ 150 mg/day)
  • Postage in the USA: $ 6.80 
  • Postage outside the USA: https://postcalc.usps.com/
  • PayPal fees:

https://salecalc.com...a&r=4&m=0&c=0  

(Click 'To receive this' to get the full amount required for the purchase)

or

Use personal payments to avoid or reduce fees:

https://www.paypal.c...ay-fees-outside

 

Full details and discussion can be found here:
http://www.longecity...ndpost&p=765835



#276 resveratrol_guy

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Posted 06 May 2016 - 02:30 AM

Has anyone taken a dose yet? Not that I would expect anything other than a stomach ache this soon, but what have you experienced?



#277 Der Springende Punkt

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Posted 06 May 2016 - 12:04 PM

Has anyone taken a dose yet? Not that I would expect anything other than a stomach ache this soon, but what have you experienced?

 

I have taken 250 mg for 4 days (it's not intended for me but wanted to test if it has some acute adverse events). I did not notice any side effects.


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#278 resveratrol_guy

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Posted 07 May 2016 - 09:17 PM

Thanks for being so crazy brave, Der Springende Punkt. You might want to consider taking quercetin because...

 

It occurred to me that nilotinib is in the same drug family as dasatinib and bosutinib, namely, tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Therefore it would stand to reason that combining it with quercetin would result in a crude senolytic, achieving senescent cell killing from a couple different pathways. So we could get an antidementia, anticancer, and senolytic effect all in one.

 

I would be remiss not to mention that most cancers successfully treated with chemotherapy, such as nilotinib, return with greater and often fatal aggression. However, the drugs do seem to extend life. The question remains, though: what if one does not have cancer, but takes nilotinib anyway? On the one hand, it should kill off the less aggressive cancer cells, leaving their aggressive counterparts intact. But on the other hand, those cells should be relatively isolated in healthy individuals, so there's no huge void to be filled by their proliferation. With fewer senescent immune cells, and fewer less agressive cancer cells, furthermore, the result should be increased immune capacity for keeping cancer under control. And fundamentally, I fall back on the rodent research showing life extension via dasatinib plus quercetin, which presumably involved healthy mice.

 

In other words, taking nilotinib will probably leave us with a higher percentage of aggressive cancer cells, whether or not in isolation or in tumors. However, it would be expected to extend life regardless of cancer status.

 

At least, that's my theory. I mention it just because it's a serious consideration.

 


Edited by resveratrol_guy, 07 May 2016 - 09:19 PM.


#279 tunt01

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Posted 07 May 2016 - 10:14 PM

Has dastanib been shown to cause autophagocytosis of beta amyloid ?  in vitro?  in vivo?

 

 



#280 resveratrol_guy

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Posted 07 May 2016 - 11:23 PM

Has dastanib been shown to cause autophagocytosis of beta amyloid ?  in vitro?  in vivo?

 

Even if it does, I don't think it will help most people in this thread. Clearing beta amyloid, except possibly at preclinical stages of dementia, is virtually useless. However, it seems quite clear at this point that nilotinib [sic] clears beta amyloid, phosphotau, and alpha synuclein inside of neurons (but not outside of them). It also kills senescent cells, which is why it makes an appealing chemotherapy drug. Bear in mind, this occurs over several weeks. Presumably, dasatinib does the same thing at different doses.


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#281 Der Springende Punkt

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Posted 08 May 2016 - 09:48 AM

Thanks for being so crazy brave, Der Springende Punkt. You might want to consider taking quercetin because...

 

It occurred to me that nilotinib is in the same drug family as dasatinib and bosutinib, namely, tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Therefore it would stand to reason that combining it with quercetin would result in a crude senolytic, achieving senescent cell killing from a couple different pathways. So we could get an antidementia, anticancer, and senolytic effect all in one.

 

I would be remiss not to mention that most cancers successfully treated with chemotherapy, such as nilotinib, return with greater and often fatal aggression. However, the drugs do seem to extend life. The question remains, though: what if one does not have cancer, but takes nilotinib anyway? On the one hand, it should kill off the less aggressive cancer cells, leaving their aggressive counterparts intact. But on the other hand, those cells should be relatively isolated in healthy individuals, so there's no huge void to be filled by their proliferation. With fewer senescent immune cells, and fewer less agressive cancer cells, furthermore, the result should be increased immune capacity for keeping cancer under control. And fundamentally, I fall back on the rodent research showing life extension via dasatinib plus quercetin, which presumably involved healthy mice.

 

In other words, taking nilotinib will probably leave us with a higher percentage of aggressive cancer cells, whether or not in isolation or in tumors. However, it would be expected to extend life regardless of cancer status.

 

At least, that's my theory. I mention it just because it's a serious consideration.

 

Thanks for these cautios infos, rg. I hope no one here considers taking N as a preventative but only as a last resort for deadly neurological disorders - and only if one is really sure to take the risk to aggravate the condition. I would be more concerned about the cardiovascular and hemorrhagic risks of N which are a big problem in practise. I'm not aware of an increased risk of other cancer entities in the leukemia patients taking N for years. 
 



#282 resveratrol_guy

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Posted 08 May 2016 - 11:38 PM

 

Thanks for these cautios infos, rg. I hope no one here considers taking N as a preventative but only as a last resort for deadly neurological disorders - and only if one is really sure to take the risk to aggravate the condition. I would be more concerned about the cardiovascular and hemorrhagic risks of N which are a big problem in practise. I'm not aware of an increased risk of other cancer entities in the leukemia patients taking N for years. 
 

 

In intrigued by your comments here. First of all, why would N worsen neurological condition? Because autophagy goes too far, and starts killing off not-really-senescent cells? Is there any evidence of this? (That might be true at inappropriately high doses. I vaguely recall reading about exactly that hazard with high-dose lithium and sodium selenide, which both enhance autophagy. Hopefully that will jog someone's memory.)

 

Secondly, it doesn't seem to me that cardiovascular problems are actually such a big problem. It's reassuring to me that the 12 Parkinson's patients, who surely could not have been in great cardiovascular shape, had no incidents worth reporting during the course of the study. And what's this about hemorrages? Any references? That's new to me.

 

Increased cancer risk, in my view, is the most important question of all. We can largely cure cardiomyopathy these days with stem cells and exercise, and soon perhaps myostatin inhibition. But cancer is a horrendous problem. But I don't even see a good theoretical argument for why N would increase cancer morbidity, even though we know that it will bias established cancer towards being more aggressive. I think that most people would agree that getting a more aggressive cancer but living a few years longer is a good trade. People who disagree probably shouldn't take N.

 

What data did you study in which you noted the lack of increased cancer rates in leukemia patients?

 

Thanks for sharing your analysis.



#283 45rpm

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Posted 09 May 2016 - 12:03 AM

Hello,

 

I'm a newbie on LongeCity who has been following the two group buys of Nilotinib. I would like to purchase 20 grams. I can pay right away.

 

My background:

 

My elderly mother was diagnosed with Parkinson's in July 2013 and her condition dramatically deteriorated within the first six months after her diagnosis. Over the next two years, I spent 15 to 20 weeks online and in libraries every week looking for a cure. With my history of studying alternative medicine for 25 years, I was convinced that I could find an effective treatment. On many occasions, I thought I had found something that would work. I tried everything from Dihexa to various forms of cinnamon oil, but nothing helped. But on the two year anniversary of her diagnosis, I concluded that I was wrong -- there is no cure. Then two weeks later, I had a change of heart after reading a very interesting study.

 

Since then, I have found a number of things that look like strong candidates for a cure. Unfortunately, my mother also suffers advanced kidney disease which precludes her from trying some of these therapies.

 

Here's a list of what I believe are possible cures:

 

(1) Tudca. This works for early stage Parkinson's and is said to halt the progression of the disease.

(2) Low doses of either of two common anti-rejection drugs. People who take these oral drugs after receiving transplants rarely get Parkinson's or Alzheimer's.

(3) A drug cocktail of four anti-Malaria drugs.

 

There's a few more that I haven't listed.

 


Edited by 45rpm, 09 May 2016 - 12:16 AM.

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#284 resveratrol_guy

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Posted 09 May 2016 - 02:24 AM


(1) Tudca. This works for early stage Parkinson's and is said to halt the progression of the disease.

(2) Low doses of either of two common anti-rejection drugs. People who take these oral drugs after receiving transplants rarely get Parkinson's or Alzheimer's.

(3) A drug cocktail of four anti-Malaria drugs.

 

There's a few more that I haven't listed.

 

Can you please provide names for #2 and #3? Thanks for sharing.
 



#285 45rpm

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Posted 09 May 2016 - 04:20 AM

Here are the names of the drugs:

 

2. Tacrolimus and Cyclosporine. The research into these drugs as treatments is absolutely amazing, but as expected there are some potentially serious side effects.

 

3. Chloroquine, Amodiaquine and Methylene Blue. I apologize but I don't remember the name of the fourth drug.

 

Lastly, there's an over the counter medication that I had high hopes of curing Parkinson's. It's called Ambroxol and it's only available in Europe. I couldn't find anyone selling it on Amazon but there are a few people selling it on Ebay. My mother had to stop taking it after just two days because it was drying out her throat and giving her coughing fits.

 

 


Edited by 45rpm, 09 May 2016 - 04:44 AM.


#286 Der Springende Punkt

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Posted 09 May 2016 - 06:57 AM

 

 

Thanks for these cautios infos, rg. I hope no one here considers taking N as a preventative but only as a last resort for deadly neurological disorders - and only if one is really sure to take the risk to aggravate the condition. I would be more concerned about the cardiovascular and hemorrhagic risks of N which are a big problem in practise. I'm not aware of an increased risk of other cancer entities in the leukemia patients taking N for years. 
 

 

In intrigued by your comments here. First of all, why would N worsen neurological condition? Because autophagy goes too far, and starts killing off not-really-senescent cells? Is there any evidence of this? (That might be true at inappropriately high doses. I vaguely recall reading about exactly that hazard with high-dose lithium and sodium selenide, which both enhance autophagy. Hopefully that will jog someone's memory.)

 

Secondly, it doesn't seem to me that cardiovascular problems are actually such a big problem. It's reassuring to me that the 12 Parkinson's patients, who surely could not have been in great cardiovascular shape, had no incidents worth reporting during the course of the study. And what's this about hemorrages? Any references? That's new to me.

 

Increased cancer risk, in my view, is the most important question of all. We can largely cure cardiomyopathy these days with stem cells and exercise, and soon perhaps myostatin inhibition. But cancer is a horrendous problem. But I don't even see a good theoretical argument for why N would increase cancer morbidity, even though we know that it will bias established cancer towards being more aggressive. I think that most people would agree that getting a more aggressive cancer but living a few years longer is a good trade. People who disagree probably shouldn't take N.

 

Hi rg,

 

I did not meant to state that N may worsen neurological conditions as per se. I'm not aware of any potential of N to have direct negative neurological effects. I was referring to the possibility to worsen neurological conditions by cardiovascular problems like strokes. 

More than half of the recruited patients for the Parkinson/LWD study were excluded because of cardiovascular contraindications (including hypertension). I can't find the reference atm - so if anyone has seen the same quote please post the link.

 

See this review of the cardiovascular problems of N in leukemia patients:

http://www.nature.co...eu2013112a.html

 

Hemorrhage risks:

http://www.fda.gov/S...n/ucm218929.htm

 

It is likely that those risks are less a problem in the dose range of 150 - 300 mg since they seem to be dose dependent.

 

 

What data did you study in which you noted the lack of increased cancer rates in leukemia patients?

 

Thanks for sharing your analysis.

 

I didn't see any reports of increased cancer rates in leukemia patients treated with TKIs (but didn't looked closely at this).



#287 LongLife

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Posted 09 May 2016 - 06:36 PM

LOGIC:

I am in for 70 grams. You have my data. Thank you. i hope we have got a kilo together now. 



#288 bossmanglb

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Posted 09 May 2016 - 08:08 PM

45rpm, 

 

It will be interesting to see the effects  of Nilotinib on her kidney disease, no?

 

I'm curious if Dihexa had any effects for her CKD, in particular reduction in renal fibrosis?

Have you looked into or found any successful treaments for her CKD?

 

 

Hello,

 

I'm a newbie on LongeCity who has been following the two group buys of Nilotinib. I would like to purchase 20 grams. I can pay right away.

 

My background:

 

My elderly mother was diagnosed with Parkinson's in July 2013 and her condition dramatically deteriorated within the first six months after her diagnosis. Over the next two years, I spent 15 to 20 weeks online and in libraries every week looking for a cure. With my history of studying alternative medicine for 25 years, I was convinced that I could find an effective treatment. On many occasions, I thought I had found something that would work. I tried everything from Dihexa to various forms of cinnamon oil, but nothing helped. But on the two year anniversary of her diagnosis, I concluded that I was wrong -- there is no cure. Then two weeks later, I had a change of heart after reading a very interesting study.

 

Since then, I have found a number of things that look like strong candidates for a cure. Unfortunately, my mother also suffers advanced kidney disease which precludes her from trying some of these therapies.

 

Here's a list of what I believe are possible cures:

 

(1) Tudca. This works for early stage Parkinson's and is said to halt the progression of the disease.

(2) Low doses of either of two common anti-rejection drugs. People who take these oral drugs after receiving transplants rarely get Parkinson's or Alzheimer's.

(3) A drug cocktail of four anti-Malaria drugs.

 

There's a few more that I haven't listed.

 



#289 45rpm

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Posted 09 May 2016 - 10:38 PM

The Dihexa "seemed" to have no effect on her CKD. As for a good treatment, I have a list of supplements that I need to investigate. But for now, I don't have the time. I'll get to that next month.

 

There are two things that I'm giving her right now which have stopped the progression of the disease and will keep her from having to get dialysis: a teaspoon of baking soda two or three times a week and activated charcoal capsules.

 

As for Nilotinib, yes I am curious to see how that affects her kidneys. I've already told her that they might get better with this treatment.


Edited by 45rpm, 09 May 2016 - 11:21 PM.


#290 Logic

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Posted 10 May 2016 - 02:43 PM

Thanks for being so crazy brave, Der Springende Punkt. You might want to consider taking quercetin because...
 
It occurred to me that nilotinib is in the same drug family as dasatinib and bosutinib, namely, tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Therefore it would stand to reason that combining it with quercetin would result in a crude senolytic, achieving senescent cell killing from a couple different pathways. So we could get an antidementia, anticancer, and senolytic effect all in one.


True.
I wonder if there might not be an additive or synergistic effect with some of  the substances mentioned in the senolytics thread.
http://www.longecity...nds-healthspan/
 
I did post about Nilotinib there and wonder if anyones research is headed in this direction?

It's a pity the MMTP people and Steve H don't seem more interested..?

 

I would be remiss not to mention that most cancers successfully treated with chemotherapy, such as nilotinib, return with greater and often fatal aggression. However, the drugs do seem to extend life. The question remains, though: what if one does not have cancer, but takes nilotinib anyway? On the one hand, it should kill off the less aggressive cancer cells, leaving their aggressive counterparts intact. But on the other hand, those cells should be relatively isolated in healthy individuals, so there's no huge void to be filled by their proliferation. With fewer senescent immune cells, and fewer less agressive cancer cells, furthermore, the result should be increased immune capacity for keeping cancer under control. And fundamentally, I fall back on the rodent research showing life extension via dasatinib plus quercetin, which presumably involved healthy mice.
 
In other words, taking nilotinib will probably leave us with a higher percentage of aggressive cancer cells, whether or not in isolation or in tumors. However, it would be expected to extend life regardless of cancer status.
 
At least, that's my theory. I mention it just because it's a serious consideration.


I think you may be 'scaring the locals' a little here!? :)

 

This stems from our conversation where I said:

"...attacking the cancer from every angle you can certainly makes the most sense to me.
One drug may kill off 99.9% of the cancerous cells, but there will always be 1 or 2 that by pure chance will have a mutation that allows then to survive the treatment. Then the cancer comes back and is immune to whatever worked the 1st time..."

http://www.longecity...ndpost&p=697618

 

So assuming that the lower doses used here have the same epigenetic effect as the higher doses used for Leukemia; IF you happen to have some cancerous cells that are susceptible to N and IF some of those happen to have a mutation that allows them to survive the 'treatment';  N probably wont work as a cancer treatment, in the future, for you.

Personally I am not nearly as worried about cancer as I used to be after getting my head around the warburg effect etc.

http://www.anti-agin...-aging-in-2013/
http://www.anti-agin...-same-strategy/
http://www.longecity...therapy-target/

There are more links in the above linked thread.



#291 Logic

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Posted 10 May 2016 - 06:55 PM

Group buy round 2:

The cutoff date for this group buy (round 2) is tomorrow; Wednesday 11 May. 

The following people have committed to a 2nd group buy of Nilotinib and have paid:

 

NAME:                     AMOUNT (grams):
David Watford          300
centralFloridaMan   150
mlsirkis                     50
deetown                   20

thedarkbobo            5

45rpm                      20

Longlife                    81

Total                        626

 

The following people showed interest?

Logjam                    15
Ark                          10
prophets                  20
izan82                     10
gedanken                10
Linda Gray
aaCharley
Sleepdealer
yogi
glowso
cjlmom
betaeyes

 

You have 1 day left to join the buy if you still want to do so.

 

Contacting me and reqd info:
Anyone interested in the group buy is welcome to contact me via PM.
(I am now a full longecity member, so am able to PM everyone back without limitations.)

 

The info I require to complete my spreadsheet is:

  • Your real name and mailing address. (a contact # for the mailing may help too; if you are not at home at the time of delivery etc)
  • Your Email address. 

I will then Email you with the full amount required for the Nilotinib,including:

  • Postage via USPS (with tracking #) to your door.
  • The small paypal fee for personal payments.

The reason for using the personal payment options is that:
It's a lot cheaper.  1% + $ 0.30 instead of 3.5-4.5%
There is no chance of PayPal holding the funds for 21 days.

 


Edited by Logic, 10 May 2016 - 07:00 PM.


#292 Logic

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Posted 10 May 2016 - 07:00 PM

1 day left to the close of Group Buy Round 2.

http://www.longecity...ndpost&p=773886



#293 Logic

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Posted 10 May 2016 - 07:01 PM

1 day left to the close of Group Buy Round 2.
http://www.longecity...ndpost&p=773886



#294 LongLife

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Posted 11 May 2016 - 09:54 PM

BOSSMANGLB:

Welcome aboard to the forum. I believe you will get a lot out of participating as there are many well verses people here. Make a friend, be a friend. Take care. LongLife.



#295 Logic

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Posted 11 May 2016 - 09:58 PM

Group buy round 2:

 

Closing date extended to Tuesday the 17th of May:

 

Two of the larger payments are 'Pending' in paypal.

I/we have and are doing we can to resolve this, but they are only likely to clear on next week Tuesday the 17th. 
That means that that there  is no point in closing this buy just yet, as long as any further payments don't end up 'Pending'.
Any further payments that do end up 'Pending' will either be refunded, or have to wait for round 3.

If anyone has any advice on dealing with PayPal's pending payments, plz let me know.  I have not found any worthwhile information on the internet yet.

 

 

The following people have committed to a 2nd group buy of Nilotinib and have paid:

NAME:                     AMOUNT (grams):
 

David Watford         300

centralFloridaMan   150

deetown                  20

prophets                  30

mlsirkis                    50

thedarkbobo            5

45rpm                      20

Longlife                    81

00evelyn                  10

Ark                           10

Park2011                  20    

Total                        696



#296 LongLife

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Posted 11 May 2016 - 10:18 PM

 

Thanks for being so crazy brave, Der Springende Punkt. You might want to consider taking quercetin because...

 

It occurred to me that nilotinib is in the same drug family as dasatinib and bosutinib, namely, tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Therefore it would stand to reason that combining it with quercetin would result in a crude senolytic, achieving senescent cell killing from a couple different pathways. So we could get an antidementia, anticancer, and senolytic effect all in one.

 

I would be remiss not to mention that most cancers successfully treated with chemotherapy, such as nilotinib, return with greater and often fatal aggression. However, the drugs do seem to extend life. The question remains, though: what if one does not have cancer, but takes nilotinib anyway? On the one hand, it should kill off the less aggressive cancer cells, leaving their aggressive counterparts intact. But on the other hand, those cells should be relatively isolated in healthy individuals, so there's no huge void to be filled by their proliferation. With fewer senescent immune cells, and fewer less agressive cancer cells, furthermore, the result should be increased immune capacity for keeping cancer under control. And fundamentally, I fall back on the rodent research showing life extension via dasatinib plus quercetin, which presumably involved healthy mice.

 

In other words, taking nilotinib will probably leave us with a higher percentage of aggressive cancer cells, whether or not in isolation or in tumors. However, it would be expected to extend life regardless of cancer status.

 

At least, that's my theory. I mention it just because it's a serious consideration.

 

Thanks for these cautios infos, rg. I hope no one here considers taking N as a preventative but only as a last resort for deadly neurological disorders - and only if one is really sure to take the risk to aggravate the condition. I would be more concerned about the cardiovascular and hemorrhagic risks of N which are a big problem in practise. I'm not aware of an increased risk of other cancer entities in the leukemia patients taking N for years. 
 

 

DER SRINGENDE PUNKT: What is that translated into English, please?

 

Cancer aggression: Correct, the cause of the cancer is not eliminated and it is may well come back aggressively. According to PUBMED, intake of daily selenium (preferably ALL three forms, the two natural and the SYNTHETIC, as the later is found to be most effective for cancer over the two natural forms). It appears that 200mg a day is good, maybe double that for avoiding cancer kick-back.

 

Also organic, water soluble ZINC, mostly above 20mg but not more than 50mg on a prolonged basis...according to the research. So we are talking about very effective ACETATE form and the chelated forms, not the oxide or sulfate forms. There are seven forms of zinc. maybe from "best" to worst are CHELATED, ACETATE, OROTATE, PICOLINIC, and GLUCONATE.

Also keep in mind that minerals, as well as vitamins, do need to be combined with there co-workers and not just taken individually. The selenium and zinc would be addressed with separate supplementation or find good food, natural sources, (brasil nuts, etc) and the  Selenomethionine synthetic form is obviously not available from nature. 

 

Before anyone toots me for not giving the sites, just kindly request them if needed. I just got in from four days in the Andies and checked the site for progress on the second purchase of N. So it's to the shower and wash the cloths. 



#297 LongLife

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Posted 11 May 2016 - 10:31 PM

Group buy round 2:

 

Closing date extended to Tuesday the 17th of May:

 

Two of the larger payments are 'Pending' in paypal.

I/we have and are doing we can to resolve this, but they are only likely to clear on next week Tuesday the 17th. 
That means that that there  is no point in closing this buy just yet, as long as any further payments don't end up 'Pending'.
Any further payments that do end up 'Pending' will either be refunded, or have to wait for round 3.

If anyone has any advice on dealing with PayPal's pending payments, plz let me know.  I have not found any worthwhile information on the internet yet.

 

 

The following people have committed to a 2nd group buy of Nilotinib and have paid:

NAME:                     AMOUNT (grams):
 

David Watford         300

centralFloridaMan   150

deetown                  20

prophets                  30

mlsirkis                    50

thedarkbobo            5

45rpm                      20

Longlife                    81

00evelyn                  10

Ark                           10

Park2011                  20    

Total                        696

LOGIC:

IS IT OVER $700 or under? Let's see which amounts got held up between the two purchases. Then we will presume that PayPal threshold is xxx before they hold. Also you may need to open up accounts for mom and family so all these "friends and family" PayPal funding don't get you permanently frozen. I think there are two other alternatives which I will PM you about also for fund transfers. 

 

Eventually there will be Parkinson "re-users" and that can be handled off forum and the funds transfers can be handled differently too. Once we have that part handled then we don't need to discuss it anymore. I was very nervous the first round with so much at stake on my end. I imagine everyone is pretty much the same no matter what the amount at stake is, correct?

 

Your doing a great job LOGIC and a lot of people are getting help that would not be able to afford it any other way. Thank you.



#298 ceridwen

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Posted 11 May 2016 - 10:46 PM

Mine still hasn't arrived!

#299 ceridwen

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Posted 11 May 2016 - 10:55 PM

I used the tracking number Logic gave me and it was not found!

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#300 Logic

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Posted 11 May 2016 - 11:24 PM

Mine still hasn't arrived!

 

I have just checked the tracking # I sent you on USPS's site ceridwen.

https://tools.usps.c...irmAction_input

 

Your parcel departed London on May 10, 2016 at 11:54 am

 

The latest entry says:
Your item was processed through a facility in UNITED KINGDOM on May 11, 2016 at 12:11 pm. The item is currently in transit to the destination.

So it looks like you must have entered the # incorrectly and will receive your package soon. 

I have PMed you with more specific info and assistance.

Do keep me updated.


Edited by Logic, 11 May 2016 - 11:32 PM.

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