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Pregnancy - what to take and avoid

boron pregnancy silicon

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#1 shifter

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Posted 20 March 2016 - 11:07 AM


My wife (not pregnant yet) is taking the Garden of Life Prenatal formula as it's one of the only ones that uses folate instead of folic acid, but it's calcium and magnesium profile is dismal. I've been looking around for a good one but the only ones I can find are like the Jarrows Ultra Bone-Up but it has Boron and Silicon which I've read are to be avoided in pregnancy (albeit they are in small amounts).

Is 3mg of Boron and 5mg Silicon anything to worry about?

Other formulas I've seen have Vandium but I just wanted a decent calcium and magnesium combo that comes from a good source, is well absorbed and that doesn't have any other wild things.

I've also got her on extra vitamin D3, K2 and fish oil for the DHA. Is there any other useful thing? She is 38 so she's worried it will be quite hard and demanding of her body.

Edited by shifter, 20 March 2016 - 11:19 AM.


#2 Ohm

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Posted 20 March 2016 - 05:45 PM

These all use folate over folic acid,

 

https://www.thorne.c.../basic-prenatal

http://www.pureencap...ved-101856.html

http://catalog.desig...ro-180-capsules

 



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#3 Nuke

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Posted 22 March 2016 - 05:13 AM

I would look at little extra Lithium and Iodine. I have not really done research on this topic yet, but I have made a mental note on those minerals. Something else that may warrant research is Spirulina - its pretty high in Uridine.

 

 


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#4 drew_ab

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Posted 22 March 2016 - 11:30 AM

How about plenty of whole plant foods, preferably organic - as your primary source of vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients.  And a little high quality meat if that's your kind of thing.  


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#5 Ohm

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Posted 22 March 2016 - 12:03 PM

How about plenty of whole plant foods, preferably organic - as your primary source of vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients.  And a little high quality meat if that's your kind of thing.  

 

Why??



#6 Sith

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 02:45 PM

Folate, Vitamin D3, Omega-3 FAs.

 

However, do make sure the omega-3 supplement is of the highest quality available to avoid any mercury toxicity. Ultimately, you should consults your doctor rather than rely on the internet. Pregnancy is a time of heightened sensitivity and you should take precautions before starting new supplements. See your doctor. 


I would look at little extra Lithium and Iodine. I have not really done research on this topic yet, but I have made a mental note on those minerals. Something else that may warrant research is Spirulina - its pretty high in Uridine.

 

Lithium is potentially harmful for the Fetus!



#7 Strelok

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 03:26 PM

My suggestions would be (daily dose):

 

Vitamin D 2000-4000IU

Vitamin K2 MK7 200mcg or MK4 15mg

Iodine/Iodide 500mcg - 1mg

High Quality Cod Liver Oil for Omega-3s and Vitamin A

Magnesium 400-600mg

Fermented foods and probiotics

 

An overall high quality diet is critical, so be sure to primarily focus on that.  And don't forget about regular exercise, sleep/rest, and stress management throughout pregnancy. 



#8 Nuke

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 04:28 PM

 
J Am Coll Nutr. 2002 Feb;21(1):14-21.
Lithium: occurrence, dietary intakes, nutritional essentiality.
Abstract

Lithium is found in variable amounts in foods; primary food sources are grains and vegetables; in some areas, the drinking water also provides significant amounts of the element. Human dietary lithium intakes depend on location and the type of foods consumed and vary over a wide range. Traces of lithium were detected in human organs and fetal tissues already in the late 19th century, leading to early suggestions as to possible specific functions in the organism. However, it took another century until evidence for the essentiality of lithium became available. In studies conducted from the 1970s to the 1990s, rats and goats maintained on low-lithium rations were shown to exhibit higher mortalities as well as reproductive and behavioral abnormalities. In humans defined lithium deficiency diseases have not been characterized, but low lithium intakes from water supplies were associated with increased rates of suicides, homicides and the arrest rates for drug use and other crimes. Lithium appears to play an especially important role during the early fetal development as evidenced by the high lithium contents of the embryo during the early gestational period. The biochemical mechanisms of action of lithium appear to be multifactorial and are intercorrelated with the functions of several enzymes, hormones and vitamins, as well as with growth and transforming factors. The available experimental evidence now appears to be sufficient to accept lithium as essential; a provisional RDA for a 70 kg adult of 1,000 microg/day is suggested.

 

 

I fully agree that taking high dose lithium is a bad idea, but the normal supplement amounts are on a total different level. Most supplements are about 5mg of lithium per day. On the other hand, if we work on a dose of 1000mg lithium carbonate a day, eg. for bi-polar, it will give you 187mg of lithium.

 

This study seems to think that 3x 400mg of lithium carbonate is the max dose per day. Seeing that lithium is about 20% of the weight of its carbonate, it gives you almost 80mg Li per dose. Still far from 5mg.

 

 



#9 Sith

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 05:42 PM

My suggestions would be (daily dose):

 

Vitamin D 2000-4000IU

Vitamin K2 MK7 200mcg or MK4 15mg

Iodine/Iodide 500mcg - 1mg

High Quality Cod Liver Oil for Omega-3s and Vitamin A

Magnesium 400-600mg

Fermented foods and probiotics

 

An overall high quality diet is critical, so be sure to primarily focus on that.  And don't forget about regular exercise, sleep/rest, and stress management throughout pregnancy. 

 

Avoid cod liver oil! 

 

I am so worried about the quackery and dangerous advice people are promoting on this thread! You can easily get too much vitamin A through cod liver oil supplementation. 


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#10 hotbit

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 06:31 PM

I assume you live in the US or similar country, where plenty of high quality food is available. I would be cautious with supplementation, overdosing can be very bad.

Ginger.
Do some research on ginger, it is healthy in many ways and I have read it suppresses nausea. Best is raw.

 

Don't feed your wife polar bear liver, it has so much vit A it is poisonous! :)



#11 pamojja

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 07:08 PM

Don't feed your wife polar bear liver, it has so much vit A it is poisonous! :)

 
 
http://www.onlinehol...ar-bear-livers/



#12 shifter

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 01:53 AM

The multivitamin from 'Garden of Life' already has 100% of the daily iodine and things like iron. The only concern was the lack of calcium and Magnesium. I went ahead and ordered the Jarrow Ultra Bone Up but instead of taking 6 per day (as per it's serving size) I'll encourage her to take 3. This will still give a fair amount of calcium that she wouldn't ordinarily get.

I also found that chia seeds are an inexpensive form of calcium and it has the other minerals as well as some omega 3. I have also ordered prenatal omega 3 from good reputable brands.

Before our first child she had several early miscarriages. I got her to get blood tests to check for everything and the only concern was a near critical deficiency in vitamin D, despite her getting good sun exposure and basic supplements as found in prenatal. (however Asian skin makes it harder to get through sun). I got her on several 10,000iu supplements per day for a few weeks and boosted it up and next pregnancy was successful. Despite taking 10,000iu per day throughout the pregnancy the level did drop.

I strongly believe in k2 supplementation for almost every one as the western diet simply doesn't have it in there (unless you eat sticks of butter and aged cheeses are not advised in pregnancy). So I'm getting her to have at least 200mcg a day of the mk7 variety

Given she's about to construct an entirely new skeleton, I want to make sure her diet has the materials it needs or it will leech it from her existing one. Not good for her bones or teeth, so that's why I was after a good calcium and cofactor combo. However most good ones had things like vanadium in there and I question if some of these things are helpful in pregnancy. Not living in a 3rd world poor country her diet will still have plenty of meat, vegetables, fruit, grains etc so I don't want to over do any metals which could be harmful to a developing foetus. I'm sure my mum didn't supplement and I think I turned out alright

I think vitamin A in carotenes is alright but if there is advice that suggests that too much in the retin form is harmful to a foetus than its silly to gamble with that. So livers of any kind will be out! And just regular fish oil in moderation over cod liver oil will do just fine.

Just wondering what others people stay away from in pregnancy or take that I haven't thought of.

Edited by shifter, 25 March 2016 - 02:29 AM.


#13 Strelok

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 03:21 AM

 

My suggestions would be (daily dose):

 

Vitamin D 2000-4000IU

Vitamin K2 MK7 200mcg or MK4 15mg

Iodine/Iodide 500mcg - 1mg

High Quality Cod Liver Oil for Omega-3s and Vitamin A

Magnesium 400-600mg

Fermented foods and probiotics

 

An overall high quality diet is critical, so be sure to primarily focus on that.  And don't forget about regular exercise, sleep/rest, and stress management throughout pregnancy. 

 

Avoid cod liver oil! 

 

I am so worried about the quackery and dangerous advice people are promoting on this thread! You can easily get too much vitamin A through cod liver oil supplementation. 

 

 

If you drank a cup of cod liver oil daily you might get too much.  You don't know what you're talking about.

 

I'm not going to waste my time and spoon feed anybody.  I'll simply say that the risk of vitamin A toxicity if vastly overblown in regards to CLO consumption, especially when you are taking vitamin D and K concomitantly.  There are also genetic issues that may very well make the conversion of beta carotene to active vitamin A very inefficient (leading to deficiency).

 

OP, I'll tell you what is silly:  listening to the misinformed conjecture by one random forum-goer without doing the research yourself.  Did you read the article posted by pamojja? 

 

Anyway, the RDA of iodine is woefully low, which is the basis for the higher-than-RDA recommendation.  The Bone Up formula has magnesium oxide, which isn't absorbed as well as chelated forms, and it comes with too much calcium which will upset a ratio that's probably already out of balance (too much Ca).

 

I don't care whether you follow this advice or not.  But I felt compelled to at least defend my CLO recommendation for the benefit of a future little baby.

 


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#14 zorba990

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 03:39 AM

nac is actually one of the few well studied supplements for improving outcomes just keep dose reasonable.

https://sites.google...acetyl-cysteine
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#15 Sith

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 04:22 PM

 

 

My suggestions would be (daily dose):

 

Vitamin D 2000-4000IU

Vitamin K2 MK7 200mcg or MK4 15mg

Iodine/Iodide 500mcg - 1mg

High Quality Cod Liver Oil for Omega-3s and Vitamin A

Magnesium 400-600mg

Fermented foods and probiotics

 

An overall high quality diet is critical, so be sure to primarily focus on that.  And don't forget about regular exercise, sleep/rest, and stress management throughout pregnancy. 

 

Avoid cod liver oil! 

 

I am so worried about the quackery and dangerous advice people are promoting on this thread! You can easily get too much vitamin A through cod liver oil supplementation. 

 

 

If you drank a cup of cod liver oil daily you might get too much.  You don't know what you're talking about.

 

I'm not going to waste my time and spoon feed anybody.  I'll simply say that the risk of vitamin A toxicity if vastly overblown in regards to CLO consumption, especially when you are taking vitamin D and K concomitantly.  There are also genetic issues that may very well make the conversion of beta carotene to active vitamin A very inefficient (leading to deficiency).

 

OP, I'll tell you what is silly:  listening to the misinformed conjecture by one random forum-goer without doing the research yourself.  Did you read the article posted by pamojja? 

 

Anyway, the RDA of iodine is woefully low, which is the basis for the higher-than-RDA recommendation.  The Bone Up formula has magnesium oxide, which isn't absorbed as well as chelated forms, and it comes with too much calcium which will upset a ratio that's probably already out of balance (too much Ca).

 

I don't care whether you follow this advice or not.  But I felt compelled to at least defend my CLO recommendation for the benefit of a future little baby.

 

 

 

Well, I go on scientific information rather than collections of anecdotal evidence. Some quack that formulates conspiracies regarding Vitamin A toxicity is hardly sound and safe to take advice from. And why on earth would you want to risk anything that has the potential to be dangerous when there are safer alternatives? 

 

Random forum goer... Look around you and take a look at your own activities. Unbelievable. 

 

Regarding CLO Vitamin A toxicity. The absolute limit of consumption of Vitamin A is 10,000IU, around 5000IU is recommended for safety during pregnancy. Cod liver oil contains around 26000IU of of Vitamin A per 5ml. So if you take 1.5 tablespoons (hardly a cup full) of Cod liver oil, you would be going above the limit and this is dangerous territory. But it gets worse, the average American diet contains around 7000-8000IU of Vitamin A already. So to supplement any further would be preposterous. 

 

It is the opinion of many doctors and healthcare workers (all more reputable than a pro vitamin A forum goer), that Vitamin A could potentially be dangerous. Hence all the warnings. 

 

Anyway, I have said all I have to say. I hope that someone visiting this thread for advice does think twice before supplementing. 

 

http://www.nhs.uk/ch...?CategoryID=54 -Sound advice 

http://teratology.or...bs/vitamina.htm -Good advice


Edited by Sith, 25 March 2016 - 04:26 PM.

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#16 Nuke

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 05:36 PM

 

 

Regarding CLO Vitamin A toxicity. The absolute limit of consumption of Vitamin A is 10,000IU, around 5000IU is recommended for safety during pregnancy. Cod liver oil contains around 26000IU of of Vitamin A per 5ml. So if you take 1.5 tablespoons (hardly a cup full) of Cod liver oil, you would be going above the limit and this is dangerous territory. But it gets worse, the average American diet contains around 7000-8000IU of Vitamin A already. So to supplement any further would be preposterous. 

 

I have no idea where you get 26000IU per 5ml from. 

Garden of Life, Olde World Icelandic Cod Liver Oil - 4500IU / 5ml - I take this myself.

Random photo of a bottle in Wikipedia -  850IU / 5ml

 

I have no idea about the American diet, but I'm currently keeping book of my own diet, and I don't get in close to that amount. Average at 2000-3000ui from diet, mostly via beta-carotene.

 

Yes - Don't take more than a teaspoon of Olde World Icelandic Cod Liver Oil.

No - You won't be able to do it accidentally.

 

Btw a normal kitchen teaspoon is closer to 3ml, so you will get in even less should you not use a measuring spoon.

 

 


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#17 Strelok

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 05:51 PM

 

Well, I go on scientific information rather than collections of anecdotal evidence. Some quack that formulates conspiracies regarding Vitamin A toxicity is hardly sound and safe to take advice from. And why on earth would you want to risk anything that has the potential to be dangerous when there are safer alternatives? 

 

Random forum goer... Look around you and take a look at your own activities. Unbelievable. 

 

Regarding CLO Vitamin A toxicity. The absolute limit of consumption of Vitamin A is 10,000IU, around 5000IU is recommended for safety during pregnancy. Cod liver oil contains around 26000IU of of Vitamin A per 5ml. So if you take 1.5 tablespoons (hardly a cup full) of Cod liver oil, you would be going above the limit and this is dangerous territory. But it gets worse, the average American diet contains around 7000-8000IU of Vitamin A already. So to supplement any further would be preposterous. 

 

It is the opinion of many doctors and healthcare workers (all more reputable than a pro vitamin A forum goer), that Vitamin A could potentially be dangerous. Hence all the warnings. 

 

Anyway, I have said all I have to say. I hope that someone visiting this thread for advice does think twice before supplementing. 

 

http://www.nhs.uk/ch...?CategoryID=54 -Sound advice 

http://teratology.or...bs/vitamina.htm -Good advice

 

 

Cod liver oil contains around 26000IU of of Vitamin A per 5ml.

 

What is you source that CLO has 26,000IU of Vitamin A per teaspoon?  Totally laughable.  Let's have a look:

 

(vitamin A content is per teaspoon [5ml])

 

Carlson's CLO 850IU

Nordic Natural's CLO1,300-3,000IU

Swanson's CLO1,800IU

Garden of Life CLO4,500IU

Old Fashioned CLO4,000IU

Nature's Answer CLO4,000IU

These latter three are considered "high vitamin" CLOs.

 

I am not recommending reckless vitamin A consumption, but rather using CLO to ensure vitamin A sufficiency.

 

But it gets worse, the average American diet contains around 7000-8000IU of Vitamin A already. So to supplement any further would be preposterous.

 

Actually, American women get about 2000 IU daily, which is BELOW the RDA!  Source

 

So not only are most women deficient in vitamin A to begin with, but:

 

"Pregnant women need extra vitamin A for fetal growth and tissue maintenance and for supporting their own metabolism"  Source

 

So pre-existing deficiencies will 1. not only be exacerbated by pregnancy, but also 2. potentially have a deleterious effect on fetal development. 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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#18 Sith

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 06:41 PM

 

 

Well, I go on scientific information rather than collections of anecdotal evidence. Some quack that formulates conspiracies regarding Vitamin A toxicity is hardly sound and safe to take advice from. And why on earth would you want to risk anything that has the potential to be dangerous when there are safer alternatives? 

 

Random forum goer... Look around you and take a look at your own activities. Unbelievable. 

 

Regarding CLO Vitamin A toxicity. The absolute limit of consumption of Vitamin A is 10,000IU, around 5000IU is recommended for safety during pregnancy. Cod liver oil contains around 26000IU of of Vitamin A per 5ml. So if you take 1.5 tablespoons (hardly a cup full) of Cod liver oil, you would be going above the limit and this is dangerous territory. But it gets worse, the average American diet contains around 7000-8000IU of Vitamin A already. So to supplement any further would be preposterous. 

 

It is the opinion of many doctors and healthcare workers (all more reputable than a pro vitamin A forum goer), that Vitamin A could potentially be dangerous. Hence all the warnings. 

 

Anyway, I have said all I have to say. I hope that someone visiting this thread for advice does think twice before supplementing. 

 

http://www.nhs.uk/ch...?CategoryID=54 -Sound advice 

http://teratology.or...bs/vitamina.htm -Good advice

 

 

Cod liver oil contains around 26000IU of of Vitamin A per 5ml.

 

What is you source that CLO has 26,000IU of Vitamin A per teaspoon?  Totally laughable.  Let's have a look:

 

(vitamin A content is per teaspoon [5ml])

 

Carlson's CLO 850IU

Nordic Natural's CLO1,300-3,000IU

Swanson's CLO1,800IU

Garden of Life CLO4,500IU

Old Fashioned CLO4,000IU

Nature's Answer CLO4,000IU

These latter three are considered "high vitamin" CLOs.

 

I am not recommending reckless vitamin A consumption, but rather using CLO to ensure vitamin A sufficiency.

 

But it gets worse, the average American diet contains around 7000-8000IU of Vitamin A already. So to supplement any further would be preposterous.

 

Actually, American women get about 2000 IU daily, which is BELOW the RDA!  Source

 

So not only are most women deficient in vitamin A to begin with, but:

 

"Pregnant women need extra vitamin A for fetal growth and tissue maintenance and for supporting their own metabolism"  Source

 

So pre-existing deficiencies will 1. not only be exacerbated by pregnancy, but also 2. potentially have a deleterious effect on fetal development. 

 

 

That was supposed to be 2600IUAnd I'm going on actual data by the Teratology Society. And again, what you're saying is definitely reckless. As I have shown, it's easy to get too much Vitamin A through dietary measures combined with CLO. Just accept it, CLO is a bad option during pregnancy when other supplements such as Fish Oil are available as an alternative. With fish oil, pregnant women can have a higher intake and optimise their Omega-3 levels without worrying about Vitamin A toxicity. To optimise Omega-3 with CLO, a pregnant women will certainly be going over the safe limit for Vitamin A. 

 

Note: To those rating me as ill informed, you're berating the majority of the scientific community as ill informed. Since this is a universal paradigm in science and with good reason. 

 

I'm going to end it there. I just want to give the message out. 


Edited by Sith, 25 March 2016 - 06:43 PM.

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#19 Strelok

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 07:34 PM

It is ludicrous that you are so adamant about the alleged danger of a teaspoon of CLO daily for a pregnant woman.  LOL! 

 

Not that the Weston A Price foundation is represenative of the pinnacle of nutritional science, but many have been following their recommendations for decades.  I suppose all those women and babies were seriously harmed by 5000-10000IUs of vitamin A daily.  Smh...

 

http://www.westonapr...al-development/


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#20 pamojja

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 09:50 PM

Actually quite shocking what would be considered a Retinol overdose by wikipedia:

 

 

Vitamin A acute toxicity occurs when an individual ingests vitamin A in large amounts more than the daily recommended value in the threshold of 25,000 IU/kg or more. Often, the individual consumes about 3–4 times the RDA's specification.[1] Toxicity of vitamin A is believed to be associated with the intervention methods used to upgrade vitamin A levels in the body such as food modification, fortification and supplementation, all of which are employed to combat vitamin A deficiency [12] Toxicity is classified into two categories: acute and chronic toxicities. The former occurs few hours or days after ingestion of large amounts of vitamin A accidentally or via inappropriate therapy. The later toxicity (Chronic) takes place when about 4,000 IU/kg or more of vitamin A is consumed for a prolonged period of time. Symptoms associated with both toxicities include nausea, blurred vision, fatigue, weight-loss, menstrual abnormalities etc.[13]

 

For 62 kg like me that would mean I would have to take 1.550.000 IUs at once, or chronically 248.000 IUs daily!!!

 

 

Practically I got the following during the last 7 years since starting supplementing (retinol and beta-carotene combined):

 

  • 780 IU from diet (only measured the first 2 years; before starting to eat canned cod liver regularly :) )
  • 12.220 IU from supplements in average (between 1.760 and 23.200 IUs)

 

Tested my serum levels twice each time after the highest supplement intake:

 

2012:

  • 501 µg/l Retinol (425 - 831nµg/l normal range)
  • 44 mg/l Retinol binding protein (30-60 mg/l normal range)

 

2015:

  • 597 µg/l
  • 53 mg/l

 

Each time the retinol to RBP ratio came back at 11.4. According to the lab ≥ 7 is considered sufficient. But that was with a lot of cod liver and supplementation. Would be curious to know the serum levels of those here who exhibit retinol phobia..

 

 

Content in 100g of canned cod liver:

 

http://www.ernaehrun...erve-in-Oel.php

Inhaltsstoff    Menge    Einheit

Broteinheiten    0.08    
Kilokalorien    613    
Kilojoule    2568    
Eiweiß    5.1    g
Fett    66.599    g
Kohlenhydrate    1    g
Wasser    26.801    g
Cholesterin    800    mg
Mineralstoffe    0.5    g

Vitamin A Retinol    13.815    mg   
Vitamin D    180.5    µg    
Vitamin E Aktiv.    7.013    mg
Vitamin B1    0.065    mg
Vitamin B2    0.423    mg
Niacinäquivalent    2208    µg
Vitamin B6    0.098    mg
Folsäure    195    µg
Vitamin B12    6.5    µg
Vitamin C    0.003    mg
a-Tocopherol    7.013    mg
Pantothensäure    0.416    mg

Natrium    383    mg
Kalium    85    mg
Magnesium    5    mg
Calcium    7    mg
Eisen    0.029    mg
Phosphor    65    mg
Kupfer    431    µg
Zink    1.282    mg
Chlorid    35    mg
Fluorid    4    µg
Jodid    626    µg
Mangan    175    µg

Arginin    209    mg
Cystin    35    mg
Histidin    91    mg
Isoleucin    168    mg
Leucin    272    mg
Lysin    321    mg
Methionin    91    mg
Phenylalanin    133    mg
Threonin    157    mg
Tryptophan    35    mg
Tyrosin    115    mg
Valin    185    mg
Alanin    223    mg
Asparaginsäure    342    mg
Glutaminsäure    495    mg
Glycin    150    mg
Prolin    133    mg
Serin    161    mg
sonst. essent. Aminosäuren        mg
essent. Aminosäuren    1812    mg
sonst. n. essent. Aminosäuren        mg
n. essent. Aminosäuren    1504    mg

Ges. Fettsäuren    17.469    g
mehrf. unges. Fettsäuren    14.535    g
einfach unges. Fettsäuren    42.384    g
Myristinsäure    3.219    g
C15:O Fettsäure    410    mg
Palmitinsäure    11.081    g
Margarinsäure    587    mg
Stearinsäure    2.131    g
Behensäure    0.041    g
Palmitoleinsäure    8.158    g
Ölsäure    20.313    g
Eicosensäure    11.913    g
C22:1 Fettsäure    1.833    g
C24:1 Fettsäure    0.167    g
Linolsäure    1.321    g
Linolensäure    0.744    g
Arachidonsäure    0.677    g
C20:5 N-3 Fettsäure    3.825    g
C22:5 N-3 Fettsäure    2.08    g    
C22:6 N-3 Fettsäure    4.184    g
langkettige Fettsäuren    74388    mg
Glycerin + Lipoide    3831    mg

 


Edited by pamojja, 25 March 2016 - 09:55 PM.

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#21 gomesbs

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 12:53 PM

nac is actually one of the few well studied supplements for improving outcomes just keep dose reasonable.

https://sites.google...acetyl-cysteine

 

Thanks for the info! I've checked the study and the results are impressive and the dose was only 600 mg, despite being a small study and with <35 years old women, There are not much things to help with egg quality.

 

I know someone close who had 2 missed miscarriages after one successful pregnancy, maybe NAC will improve the odds next time (she's turning 39 in a few months).

 

There are some rat studies on Coq10 and I thought of maybe D3/K2 would help, but she didn't had her D3 levels checked, so I think i'll advise only NAC and folic acid But I'm open to more opinions.

 

Thanks.



#22 shifter

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 12:55 AM

I ordered some of the Jarrow Sustain NAC, thanks for the info. :)

 

I still have some CoQ10 in my cupboard. What are peoples thoughts on CoQ10 in pregnancy? There is some anecdotal reports on other forums that it has helped older women have better eggs (using IVF). The amounts recommended are quite high like 600-800mg though. Useful before conception or throughout pregnancy do you think

 

Also gomesbs check out on supplementing with Folate over Folic Acid instead. With pregnancy, you want the best of the best and Folic Acid seems to have its issues.

 

 

 


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#23 gomesbs

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Posted 06 September 2016 - 11:15 AM

HI,

My family conection, is going for her 3rd miscarriage in a row... despite symptomless at 5.5 wk her bHCG is increasing less than 20% in 48h (at least dosen't seem to be ectopic)

This time, following my advise, she started NAC 600mg before she conceived (2 months) and still takes it but seems like she´s going to miscarry again... apart from NAC she is only taking Folic Acid (not folate, but that what's her OB subscirbed to her) and progesterone (100mg).

A recent study claims eggs from younger mice have no difference than younger one's it's the ovaries fibrosis and inflammation with the age that damage the eggs:

https://www.scienced...60805230054.htm

She's 39 and 1/2 and I don't know what to advise more... do you think NAC can still help in reducing inflammation in ovaries, do you have other approaches?

Thanks in advance!

Bruno



#24 shifter

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Posted 10 September 2016 - 05:24 AM

Get vitamin D levels tested. Also try taking 600mg ubiquinol for a few months before conception and during the first trimester.

Im sure the doctor would have looked at bloods, but one time my friends sister had several miscarriages and with a blood test learned she was lacking some blood factor or something (I forget what it was called) but suffice to say without medication there was zero chance of ever carrying a baby to term.

But check vitamin d in any case. And start taking 10,000iu daily for a few weeks then to 5000 daily after it is in a very good range. My wife's level was so low I am sure it was a cause for her previous pregnancies ending in miscarriage as the foetus simply could not thrive. The amount of this vitamin most pregnancy multis is dismal

#25 gomesbs

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Posted 11 September 2016 - 08:24 AM

Thanks shifter!

You were looking for a good multi, which one did you end up choosing?

#26 fntms

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Posted 11 September 2016 - 12:25 PM

nhs.org recommends not to take a multi, and neither fish oil caps. Risks are with vit a and contaminants in fish oil, but perhaps if you are super careful...

#27 ironfistx

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Posted 12 September 2016 - 06:43 PM

I would look at little extra Lithium and Iodine. I have not really done research on this topic yet, but I have made a mental note on those minerals. Something else that may warrant research is Spirulina - its pretty high in Uridine.

 

I think I read something about a woman who got very sick while taking spirulina on pregnancy.  Wait it might have been the material you sometimes read about by spirulina.



#28 shifter

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Posted 11 October 2016 - 09:35 PM

I ended up getting my wife to take the Garden of Life brand. It doesn't have Folic acid and doesn't have ridiculously high amounts of other vitamins. I bought a separate Garden of Life B and C capsules to give sporadically when her diet in the day would not have been that great. Her vitamin D level recorded a result of 180 (where below 50 is considered deficient, and over 250 considered toxic so that level is good.

She also takes Jarrow Ultra Bone Up (because the calcium and magnesium in the preganancy multi is near non existent) and took Jarrow QH Ubiquinol 600mg a day until the first trimester and now takes 400mg a day

Between the Jarrow Ultra Bone Up, the multi and a separate vitamin K2 twice a day she would get close to 300ug of K2 a day

Gets between 500-1000mg of DHA a day

Give her pea protein isolate drink once or twice a day as I'm doubtful her diet gives her enough protein. I don't think she eats that great to be honest so I think all these things make it much more optimal than it otherwise would be. I think the key to great health and long life starts upon your conception. Important that all the desired building blocks are there to be utilised.

Past the 20wk scan and the report was everything was good so far

Edited by shifter, 11 October 2016 - 09:36 PM.


#29 kurdishfella

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Posted 02 August 2021 - 04:43 PM

Become pregnant asap. Because the older you get the higher chance of miscarriage or defects etc, not because it is in the human genetics programmed to do so but because your health declines. Vitamin C, zinc carnosine ( good for gut as the intestines are pushed during pregnancy's ) .


Edited by kurdishfella, 02 August 2021 - 04:44 PM.

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#30 kurdishfella

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Posted 19 January 2022 - 04:59 PM

Avoid soy (and similar products) completely and months before pregnancy. If either the man or woman is unhealthy can significantly affect if the person becomes pregnant and if it is a success. But genetics are key of course even if a person isn't living a healthy life style compared to someone that is with bad genes the former would be healthier depending on how much of a difference of course in DNA: and how much bad stuff affects them.


Edited by kurdishfella, 19 January 2022 - 05:04 PM.

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