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To eat or not to eat (before exercising): That is the question

diet exercise fasting pre-workout meal

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#1 APBT

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Posted 10 April 2017 - 11:55 PM


 

https://www.scienced...70406152651.htm

 

Exercise enthusiasts often wonder whether it's better to eat or fast before a workout. A new study is the first of its kind to show the effects of eating versus fasting on gene expression in adipose (fat) tissue in response to exercise. This study highlights the different roles fat plays in powering and responding to exercise. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology -- Endocrinology and Metabolism.

Researchers from the University of Bath in the U.K. studied a group of overweight males. The volunteers walked for 60 minutes at 60 percent maximum oxygen consumption on an empty stomach and, on another occasion, two hours after consuming a high-calorie carbohydrate-rich breakfast. The research team took multiple blood samples after eating or fasting and after exercising. The researchers also collected adipose tissue samples immediately before and one hour after walking.

Gene expression in the adipose tissue differed significantly in the two trials. The expression of two genes, PDK4 and HSL, increased when the men fasted and exercised and decreased when they ate before exercising. The rise in PDK4 likely indicates that stored fat was used to fuel metabolism during exercise instead of carbohydrates from the recent meal. HSL typically increases when adipose tissue uses stored energy to support increased activity, such as during exercise, explained Dylan Thompson, corresponding author of the study.

These results reinforce the view that "adipose tissue often faces competing challenges," Thompson wrote. After eating, adipose tissue "is busy responding to the meal and a bout of exercise at this time will not stimulate the same [beneficial] changes in adipose tissue. This means that exercise in a fasted state might provoke more favorable changes in adipose tissue, and this could be beneficial for health in the long term," he noted.

Story Source:

Materials provided by American Physiological Society (APS)Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Journal Reference:

  1. Yung-Chih Chen, Rebecca L. Travers, Jean-Philippe Walhin, Javier T. Gonzalez, Francoise Koumanov, James A. Betts, Dylan Thompson. FEEDING INFLUENCES ADIPOSE TISSUE RESPONSES TO EXERCISE IN OVERWEIGHT MENAmerican Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology And Metabolism, 2017; ajpendo.00006.2017 DOI: 10.1152/ajpendo.00006.2017

 

FULL TEXT:


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#2 gill3362

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 12:23 PM

Kinda confirms what my instincts always told me as well as the results that people like Martin Berkhan have achieved with intense fasted exercise. Thanks for sharing.



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#3 aconita

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 09:12 PM

Means just what the study is about: overweight individuals walking in a fasted state or 2 hours after a carbs rich meal.

 

Any other situation is totally unrelated.

 

Close to pointless I would say.


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#4 ta5

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Posted 12 April 2017 - 12:15 AM

I don't doubt the study. But, I wonder... If someone is thin already, is there still a benefit to exercising before eating?

 

 


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#5 aconita

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Posted 12 April 2017 - 12:28 AM

It depends on the goal but generally speaking is a bad idea because lack of energy to train hard and lot of catabolism.

 

Obviously an overweight walking has different goals than a thin weightlifting. 


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#6 gill3362

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Posted 12 April 2017 - 05:20 AM

Means just what the study is about: overweight individuals walking in a fasted state or 2 hours after a carbs rich meal.

 

Any other situation is totally unrelated.

 

Close to pointless I would say.

That is a very good point, actually. I just breezed through the study and missed that. 

I would definitely like to see the same study conducted on thin, trained individuals.

 

It depends on the goal but generally speaking is a bad idea because lack of energy to train hard and lot of catabolism.

 

Obviously an overweight walking has different goals than a thin weightlifting. 

 On this, I have to disagree. I train fasted everyday. It is something you have to get used to, but it is very possible for me personally (n=1) to have a high intensity workout with no food. At one point I was putting up 300+ lbs on the squat in a fasted state, regularly. There are also other examples, such as Martin Berkhan, whom I'm sure everyone knows for his "leangains" 18/6 Intermittent fasting protocol, but he is a competitive bodybuilder that trains fasted with only some BCAAs. 



#7 Oakman

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Posted 12 April 2017 - 03:27 PM

My totally subjective viewpoint is that it's rather difficult, practically, to exercise in a fasted state. 

 

Why? Well, my near daily routine is awake at 6:15 am, takes some supplements that are best on an empty stomach (Niagen, ectc.), wait an hour until 7:15-7:30 am, have a light (250-600 calories) breakfast of quality vegetable protein, carbs, vegetable fat, and fiber which allows me to take some supplements that are best in the AM time period with food. Obviously, this would be impossible to accomplish this without eating.

 

The intervening times give me the opportunity to read longecity.org, web news, and email, among others.

 

Then another hour wait and off to the gym or biking for 1-2 hrs about 9 am.  I've never felt any ill effects from the routine, or from eating beforehand, and I continue to maintain/improve physically. Repetitious, but it does work. 


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#8 LucasT

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 10:00 AM

I don't doubt the study. But, I wonder... If someone is thin already, is there still a benefit to exercising before eating?

 

I would say yes, and it depends on the type of exercise, of course. The study was done on low intensity, cardio-type. In this case, to me it seems reasonable that in obese and lean subjects, fasted cardio would increase metabolic flexibility. On the other hand, for weight training, is highly individual. I don´t see any benefit in this case. And consuming BCAAs means you are not fasted anymore. 



#9 ekaitz

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 01:17 AM

A bit of sugar just before an intense workout should lessen the relying on cortisol during exercise.


Edited by ekaitz, 23 May 2017 - 01:19 AM.


#10 ekaitz

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 02:47 AM

I can't find the full text of this study

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/14967868



#11 APBT

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Posted 25 May 2017 - 07:12 PM

I can't find the full text of this study

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/14967868

 

FULL TEXT:


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#12 manny

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Posted 04 June 2017 - 08:40 AM

Haven't been to the gym recently. But back in 2013 when I trained regularly, I got up to deadlifting 150kg (330lbs), and I always trained fasted after discovering IF by that Martin guy years before. Note that was a 6 rep set, not a 1 rep max (which I've never attempted ever in weightlifting). i.e. I built up to 150kg slowly and that was where my strength was at the time.

 

To be honest, I can't imagine training with food in my stomach at all now. Well at least right before training. If I've eaten 3-4 hours beforehand and can't feel it in my stomach, I'd train. But I wouldn't train soon after eating, that is for sure.



#13 aconita

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Posted 04 June 2017 - 10:20 AM

It depends by what do you eat and,,by the way, deadlifting 150kgx6 means little if we don't know how much you deadlift in a fasted state and how much in a non fasted state, still not accurate but...


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#14 manny

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 08:46 AM

Not sure how you can say it means little. Like I said I got up to that strength by training in a fasted state over time, and the progression was steady.

I doubt in my mind that I would have progressed faster while training in a non fasted state, but who knows, I was simply posting my experience that you don't need to eat before training to gain significant muscle or strength. At the end of the day it's proof to me you don't have to eat before working out.

As for the fast, it was a 16 hour fast, 8 hour feed. I would train before 2pm and then eat from 2pm-8pm.

Edited by manny, 05 June 2017 - 08:49 AM.

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#15 aconita

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 09:03 PM

If you like to hear my astonishment for your achievement you have to do better than that, actual deadlifting world record is above 500kg, I am not expecting you to match it (or even to come close to it, for that matter) but you have to do better than mere 150 in order to impress anybody unless your body weight is no more than 50kg, i which case, unless you are a dwarf, training in fasted state at least doesn't prove to build much muscles.

 

Anyway since I am a timewaster be happy with it and never mind.


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#16 manny

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 01:53 PM

150kg is what I got up to before I quite training (my uni finished in 2013 and I didn't keep up the gym habit when I got back home). I have no doubt I would have continued to gain more strength gains over time while training in a fasted state.

 

I'm not here to impress you, but how you equate 150kg as only being impressive if the person weighed 50kg is ridiculous. You are talking about elite athletic competitor goals here (deadlifting 3 times the persons bodyweight).

 

Anyone who can deadlift double their bodyweight is an intermediate, and that is impressive.

 

My goal was to stop at 200kg max if I had continued training, as I care more about longevity and aesthetics and avoiding any possible injuries; i.e. peak strength was not my ultimate goal.

 

Anyway if you argument is that training in a fasted state would not benefit the elite level athlete who wants to gain as much strength as possible, then I wouldn't know.

 

But if you argument is that training in a fasted state couldn't help the average person get to the intermediate (deadlift 2x bodyweight) / advanced (deadlift 2.5x bodyweight) level with minimum body fat, then I would respectfully disagree.

 

 


Edited by manny, 06 June 2017 - 01:57 PM.


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#17 aconita

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 09:28 PM

Since besides being a timewaster I am ill informed too better for me to avoid answering, you already know it all too well.


Since besides being a timewaster I am ill informed too better for me to avoid answering, you already know it all too well.


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