• Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log In with Google      Sign In    
  • Create Account
  LongeCity
              Advocacy & Research for Unlimited Lifespans

Photo
* * * * * 8 votes

Alzheimer's protocol — dissolve & detoxify

aβ plaques plaques oleuropein hepps epps taurine tau

  • Please log in to reply
386 replies to this topic
⌛⇒ write a quiz!

#361 Timothy

  • Guest
  • 61 posts
  • 3
  • Location:Sandton

Posted 04 January 2019 - 06:33 AM

Hi,

 

I have three questions related to the current topic:

 

1.1. How much of an impact does HEPPS have on the overall effectiveness of the combination?  I am unable to obtain a suitable HEPPS.  Will the remaining supplements have an impact?  E.g. Are synergistic effects more than ~50% when combined?

1.2. Are there any alternatives to HEPPS that can be added?

2. I'm am wanting to combine this with an arterial health protocol from (https://www.ppt-heal...aque-protocol/]). Will these two mix?

3. better for a different thread: what else is synergistic to both the AZ and AP and can be added to address plaque.

 

 

Quote for Q1.1 and Q1.2:

 

 

The following in powder form can be used in fruit juice (measured doses are approximate as powders vary) —

HEPPS —  1 g (1/4 teaspoon. In the US this can be obtained from Amazon from 2 suppliers. I’ve used RPI.   -- very strong disaggregation of Aβ.

Taurine — 10-15 g (2-3 teaspoons) -- reduction of Aβ, none of p-tau.

Carnosine — 3 g (1.5 teaspoon) -- strong effect on Aβ, none on p-tau.

Acetyl L-Carnitine — 1 g (1/2 teaspoon) -- inhibits p-tau.

Magnesium threonate — .5-1 g (1/4 teaspoon) -- strong effect on Aβ, none on p-tau.

 

The following are best in capsules (doses based on commonly available supplements) —

Olive Leaf extract 20% oleuropein — (two 500 mg caps) -- reduction of Aβ.

Olive Leaf extract 25% hydroxytyrosol — (one 100 mg cap) -- reduction of Aβ.

Dihydromyricetin — (one 350 mg cap) -- reduction of Aβ. The closely related myricetin has been found to act against p-tau.

Nicotinamide — (one 500 mg cap) -- reduction of p-tau.

Vitamin C — (one 500 mg cap or tablet)-- some decrease of p-tau, no effect on Aβ.

Glutathione — (one or two 250 mg gel caps, liposomal, CORE brand) -- Brain's master antioxidant.

Curcumin — (one 500 mg cap, liposomal, Meriva brand) -- Anti-Neuroinflammatory and blocks Aβ toxicity.

 

 
 
 
Quote for Q2:
 
1.  Remove the “rebar” – (the protein fibrin that helps hold things together.
2.  Lower the liquidity threshold.  In order for chelation to be effective, the plaque has to be loosened up.
3.  Chelation nutrients – can now do their job and begin removing molecules of the plaque.
 
Serrapeptase   (70,080 SPU)
Grapefruit Pectin   (1,000 mg) - help reduce cholesterol absorption and production.  the bile (holding cholesterol)  is unable to be re-absorbed and is removed with the stool. 
Lecithin   (900 mg) - helps fats dissolve in water making it easier for them to be removed from the body
Guar Gum   (400 mg) - supports grapefruit pectin and increases the antioxidants thereby decreasing oxidative stress.
Garlic Extract   (225 mg)
L-Lysine   (200 mg) - a high affinity for fats – especially lipid fats
Guggul Extract   (175 mg) - helps prevent blood platelets from clumping

 

 

 

 

Quote for Q3:

 

other additions:

B3 -- is it wrong to take this with Nicotinamide?

Folic Acid

Nattokinase -- is this too much of a blood thinner with everything else?

 

 

 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 



#362 v_squared123

  • Guest
  • 24 posts
  • 2
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 04 January 2019 - 08:49 AM

The links in that list are not meant to be comprehensive. There is far more research out there.

 

You listed Meriva...why not Longvida? Longvida has a rap out there about being superior for getting into the brain. Not sure how well documented that is however. Also, you take a look at that UCLA curcumin study? They used Theracurcumin which is a water-soluble form. 90 mg x2 a day. Im guessing this is a personal preferenece of yours but Dr Rhonda Patrick said all forms of curcumin can cross the BBB ( once absorbed ) so I guess any enhanced bioavialbale form would do but I do know there are superior bioavailable formulations. The author from the UCLA study said he believed the benefit from the study was most likely due to anti-inflammatory effect rather than anything else but didnt investigate it to confirm it. 

 

Just curious if curcumin could play a bigger role here since its cheaper, safer and easily attainable....Also, wouldnt it be prudent to add Vit D3? There was another study done by UCLA that focused on curcumin and d3 and showed that macrophages engulfed the plaques stained by the curcumin with the vitamin d3 promoting the immune system to do so. Someone posted the link a while ago. 

 

Also, why not add marijuana to further prevent plaque build up inside cells? Seems like the protocol is going "all out" Just a suggestion.


  • unsure x 1
  • Good Point x 1

sponsored ad

  • Advert
Click HERE to rent this advertising spot for BRAIN HEALTH to support LongeCity (this will replace the google ad above).

#363 Turnbuckle

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • 3,466 posts
  • 1,398
  • Location:USA
  • NO

Posted 04 January 2019 - 11:54 AM

I seldom use brand names and I shouldn't have with cucurmin. What you want is something more bioavailable than plain cucurmin, and those described with the words liposomal or phytosome should be rather more effective than ordinary cucurmin. And there might be something better than liposomal--

 

Methods
The relative absorption of a curcumin phytosome formulation (CP), a formulation with volatile oils of turmeric rhizome (CTR) and a formulation of curcumin with a combination of hydrophilic carrier, cellulosic derivatives and natural antioxidants (CHC) in comparison to a standardized curcumin mixture (CS) was investigated in a randomized, double-blind, crossover human study in healthy volunteers. Samples were analyzed by HPLC-MS/MS.
 
Results
Total curcuminoids appearance in the blood was 1.3-fold higher for CTR and 7.9-fold higher for CP in comparison to unformulated CS. CHC showed a 45.9-fold higher absorption over CS and significantly improved absorption over CP (5.8-fold) and CTR (34.9-fold, all p < 0.001).

 

 

This CHC cucurmin is sold as CurcuWIN. And while it may indeed be better absorbed, the 250 mg caps have only "20% total curcuminoids" according to the label. If you take that into account (the advertising doesn't), then CHC is only slightly better than liposomal products. You would have to take nearly the same weight of capsuled product as the liposomal/phytosome product to get the same blood dose, and spend far more.
 
D3 might indeed be useful as those deficient in the vitamin have a higher rate of AD. So supplementation for those with dark skin and those that don't get out much would be prudent--

Low VitD status was associated with accelerated decline in cognitive function domains in ethnically diverse older adults, including African American and Hispanic individuals who exhibited a high prevalence of VitD insufficiency or deficiency. It remains to be determined whether VitD supplementation slows cognitive decline.

 

 

 
As for marijuana, don't you think that would be even more problematical than MB?
 

  • WellResearched x 1

#364 v_squared123

  • Guest
  • 24 posts
  • 2
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 05 January 2019 - 10:14 PM

 

 

Turnbuckle's protocol utilizes olive phenols to promote clearance.  For some people at least, the impairments may result from defects in the clearance mechanisms.  See: Clearance of beta-amyloid in the brain https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/25312211

 

Some additional things that may assist with clearance: 

 

 

 

D3 and curcumin (sunlight + longvida curcumin)  

1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 interacts with curcuminoids to stimulate amyloid-beta clearance by macrophages of Alzheimer's disease patients  https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/19433889

 

 

 

 

 

 
D3 might indeed be useful as those deficient in the vitamin have a higher rate of AD. So supplementation for those with dark skin and those that don't get out much would be prudent--

 

 

 

Right. But for Vit D i was referring to its use to stimulate autophagy to engulf and clear out abeta plaques. So a sorta "detoxify" effect

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/19433889

 

 

 

Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) suffer from brain amyloidosis related to defective clearance of amyloid-beta (Abeta) by the innate immune system. To improve the innate immune system of AD patients, we studied immune stimulation of macrophages by 1alpha,25(OH)2-vitamin D3(1,25D3)
1,25D3 strongly stimulated Abeta phagocytosis and clearance while protecting against apoptosis

 

Thats just for Vitamin D. The author also added curcminoids to mix with the vit d.

 

Rationale: 

 

 

To improve the innate immune system of AD patients, we studied immune stimulation of macrophages by 1alpha,25(OH)2-vitamin D3(1,25D3) in combination with curcuminoids

 

According to the author, Vitamin D in some AD patients were non-responders. Meaning the immune system did nothing however when curcuminoids were added to the abeta plaques in the dish, staining or binding to it, it activated or stimulated the immune to be drawn to the abeta plaques and encourage clearance. So they listed the patients in two categories. Type 1 and Type 2. 

 

 

 

AD patients' macrophages segregate into Type I (positively stimulated by curcuminoids regarding MGAT-III transcription) and Type II (not stimulated). In both Type I and Type II macrophages, 1,25D3 strongly stimulated Abeta phagocytosis and clearance while protecting against apoptosis.

and

 

 

 

 1,25D3 is a promising hormone for AD immunoprophylaxis because in Type I macrophages combined treatment with 1,25D3 and curcuminoids has additive effects, and in Type II macrophages 1,25D3 treatment is effective alone. Human macrophages are a new paradigm for testing immune therapies for AD.

 

So in a way, it could be a "Bind and Detoxify" method to your "Dissolve and detoxify" for abeta plaques 

 

Cool, right? Interesting thing is they did a subsequent study with the same several patients used in the same study and provided them with Vitamin D and Curcminoids and there was a marked improvement in scores on the tests conducted before and after. I do not have the link for that study however but i believe it was completed by the same author. I read it seperately from this particular study. I dont know why there are two seperate studies evaluating those two findings.

 

Anywho, the other interesting thing is this study completed by UCLA scientists lead to the product development of Longvida Curcumind which is a SLPC curcumin ( longvida curcumin ) combined with Vitamin D3 or just vitamin D. 

 

Some things. I didn't see the author mention just how much Vitamin D3 or curcumin was given to the patients in the subsequent study. But Curcumind recommends 3 capsules x3 a day. So 9 capsules. which would give 1000 iu of vitamin d3 since its curcumin combined with vitamin d3. Again, do know if this is how much was given in the study.

 

 

I seldom use brand names and I shouldn't have with cucurmin. What you want is something more bioavailable than plain cucurmin, and those described with the words liposomal or phytosome should be rather more effective than ordinary cucurmin. And there might be something better than liposomal--

 

 

This CHC cucurmin is sold as CurcuWIN. And while it may indeed be better absorbed, the 250 mg caps have only "20% total curcuminoids" according to the label. If you take that into account (the advertising doesn't), then CHC is only slightly better than liposomal products. You would have to take nearly the same weight of capsuled product as the liposomal/phytosome product to get the same blood dose, and spend far more.
 
D3 might indeed be useful as those deficient in the vitamin have a higher rate of AD. So supplementation for those with dark skin and those that don't get out much would be prudent--

 

 
As for marijuana, don't you think that would be even more problematical than MB?

 


 

 

I have no clue if marijuana would be more problematic. Why would it? Ive read very interesting things about the use of THC and CBD for aging disorders


Edited by v_squared123, 05 January 2019 - 11:03 PM.

  • Good Point x 2
  • Agree x 1

#365 Turnbuckle

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • 3,466 posts
  • 1,398
  • Location:USA
  • NO

Posted 08 January 2019 - 09:24 PM

 

 

 

I have no clue if marijuana would be more problematic. Why would it? Ive read very interesting things about the use of THC and CBD for aging disorders

 

CBD would be fine, but THC is Schedule I and has many psychological effects that some will find very distressing. So it's not something for general use.

 

For CBD, there is some evidence that it can be helpful, such as "The studies demonstrate the ability of CBD to reduce reactive gliosis and the neuroinflammatory response as well as to promote neurogenesis."

--https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/28217094

 

It's palliative, in other words, while the goal here is not treating the damage, but eliminating the causative agents.


  • Agree x 1

#366 v_squared123

  • Guest
  • 24 posts
  • 2
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 10 January 2019 - 09:59 AM

Federally, its illegal but there are some states that have allowed recreational use and there over a dozen states that legal medical marijuana with a handful maybe less that have no legal access to recreational or medical marijuana. So its not that difficult to get. Also, there is available high quality pharmaceutical grade marijuana grown by specialized companies. I think you can even order online depending what state you are in.  



#367 v_squared123

  • Guest
  • 24 posts
  • 2
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 10 January 2019 - 10:11 AM

Hey Turnbuckle, what do you think of this? Its called Percepta. Developed by two neuroscientists to target the plaques and tangles using natural herbs.

 

http://perceptabrain.com/

 

https://www.amazon.c...d/dp/B078T3ZL9L

 

About the product
  • All natural plant-based supplement delivered in vegetarian capsules.
  • Developed by Dr. Alan Snow and Dr. Rudy Tanzi, two of the world’s leading brain aging researchers.
  • Backed by over 15 years of scientific studies and over 50 issued patents.
  • Proprietary blend of PTI-00703 cat’s claw from the Amazon rainforest and MemorTea from the mountains of China.
  • Delivers specific polyphenols that target brain “plaques and tangles” which is the real cause of normal age-related memory loss.

 

 

Yay or Nay?

 


Edited by v_squared123, 10 January 2019 - 10:20 AM.


#368 v_squared123

  • Guest
  • 24 posts
  • 2
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 10 January 2019 - 10:21 AM

Ive skimmed the website a bit. It seems interesting 

 

 

Percepta with only two ingredients markedly inhibits and reduces “plaques and tangles” in a number of in vitro and animal model studies. The science behind the product shows that the major PTI-00703® cat’s claw ingredient discovered by the Snow research teams, gets into the brain within two minutes after being in the blood (see Research Studies). In addition, having only two ingredients that are synergistic and affect the target (i.e. brain “plaques and tangles”) is mainly due to 4 important and scientific validated points.

1) There is a remarkable synergistic effect by having the specific combination of PTI-00703®cat’s claw and MemorTea—which on their own can inhibit and reduce “plaques and tangles” as well.

2) The Snow research teams have tested and identified the best source of cat’s claw and oolong tea extract—which have been (each and in combination) specifically studied to target brain “plaques and tangles” and improve memory as you normally age. The secret source of each of the two major ingredients in Percepta™ have been identified, and Cognitive Clarity Inc. (the producers of Percepta) hold the exclusive rights with each of these companies to produce PTI-00703® cat’s claw and MemorTea™, exclusive for the Percepta™ final product.

3) The two ingredients are maximized in a daily serving of two capsules (total of 750mg) to have a maximum effect on reducing brain “plaques and tangles”, and cause memory enhancement in the normal aging brain.

4) No other brain nutraceutical in the world contains PTI-00703® cat’s claw and MemorTea that have been backed by over 15 years of science and over 50 issued patents.

 


Edited by v_squared123, 10 January 2019 - 10:22 AM.


#369 Andey

  • Guest
  • 520 posts
  • 137
  • Location:Kiev, Ukraine

Posted 10 January 2019 - 11:49 AM

Should this protocol include everything that carries some promise for Alzheimer's? 


  • Good Point x 1

#370 Turnbuckle

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • 3,466 posts
  • 1,398
  • Location:USA
  • NO

Posted 10 January 2019 - 01:57 PM

Should this protocol include everything that carries some promise for Alzheimer's? 

 

No. I've put things in that are--

 

Expected to have a significant effect on the etiology of AD (ie, dissolving and detoxing p-tau and Aβ)

Nontoxic, with minimal side-effects

Legal

Easily available in the US

Inexpensive

Easy to dose


Edited by Turnbuckle, 10 January 2019 - 02:15 PM.

  • like x 2
  • Agree x 2

#371 theobromananda

  • Guest
  • 53 posts
  • 12
  • Location:Northern Germany

Posted 23 January 2019 - 10:10 AM

My 62 year old mother has been doing the protocol for a week now. She started with 0.3g HEPPS, escalating to 1g now. She is more active than before, and self-reports better and clearer thinking. It will take some time to determine if this is placebo, but the initial response seems promising.

 

She has not experienced any worsening of symptoms nor headaches. What she does experience as side effects are a prickling of the arms. Could this be the B3, even if it is flush-free? Also, her feces have the smell of acetone/a chemical, but only once since she reached 1g HEPPS.



#372 Turnbuckle

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • 3,466 posts
  • 1,398
  • Location:USA
  • NO

Posted 23 January 2019 - 11:28 AM

My 62 year old mother has been doing the protocol for a week now. She started with 0.3g HEPPS, escalating to 1g now. She is more active than before, and self-reports better and clearer thinking. It will take some time to determine if this is placebo, but the initial response seems promising.

 

She has not experienced any worsening of symptoms nor headaches. What she does experience as side effects are a prickling of the arms. Could this be the B3, even if it is flush-free? Also, her feces have the smell of acetone/a chemical, but only once since she reached 1g HEPPS.

 

Itching, rashes and intestinal gas are known side effects in some people using nicotinamide, and likely these will be temporary. In any case, this treatment should only take a few months.

 

Taurine can also cause a tingling effect. If this is objectionable, you can reduce the dose.

 

Those having close relatives with AD should get a genetic test. One APOE4 gene variant will double your risk, and two will increase it by 12 times. If you are at risk, taking this protocol for a short period once a year might provide an excellent prophylactic against it ever developing, as the toxic build up will likely precede symptoms by many years.

 

Links to the latest protocols can be found on my profile page by clicking my avatar.


Edited by Turnbuckle, 23 January 2019 - 11:38 AM.


#373 theobromananda

  • Guest
  • 53 posts
  • 12
  • Location:Northern Germany

Posted 23 January 2019 - 11:41 AM

If you are at risk, taking this protocol for a short period once a year might provide an excellent prophylactic against it ever developing, as the toxic build up will likely precede symptoms by many years.

 

What would be the age to start this as a prophylactic? Plague buildup starts early, but would I be right in assuming that this protocol is probably only recommendable once one progresses past 35-50?



#374 Turnbuckle

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • 3,466 posts
  • 1,398
  • Location:USA
  • NO

Posted 23 January 2019 - 12:02 PM

What would be the age to start this as a prophylactic? Plague buildup starts early, but would I be right in assuming that this protocol is probably only recommendable once one progresses past 35-50?

 

If you have a genetic basis for AD, then I would do this a few times a year. Early onset AD can begin in your forties, and thus build up had to start before that. Perhaps a decade earlier. So yeah, 35-50 sounds about right. Some people are believed to be especially sensitive to amyloid build-up, others especially insensitive. While it's not known why, it's possibly due to variations in the inflammatory reaction. Those with a strong reaction will likely be among the early onset cases.


  • Informative x 2

#375 v_squared123

  • Guest
  • 24 posts
  • 2
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 26 January 2019 - 07:56 PM

 

Hey Turnbuckle, what do you think of this? Its called Percepta. Developed by two neuroscientists to target the plaques and tangles using natural herbs.

 

http://perceptabrain.com/

 

https://www.amazon.c...d/dp/B078T3ZL9L

 

About the product
  • All natural plant-based supplement delivered in vegetarian capsules.
  • Developed by Dr. Alan Snow and Dr. Rudy Tanzi, two of the world’s leading brain aging researchers.
  • Backed by over 15 years of scientific studies and over 50 issued patents.
  • Proprietary blend of PTI-00703 cat’s claw from the Amazon rainforest and MemorTea from the mountains of China.
  • Delivers specific polyphenols that target brain “plaques and tangles” which is the real cause of normal age-related memory loss.

 

 

Yay or Nay?

 

 

Turnbuckle, what do you think about this? 



#376 Turnbuckle

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • 3,466 posts
  • 1,398
  • Location:USA
  • NO

Posted 26 January 2019 - 09:18 PM

Turnbuckle, what do you think about this? 

 

Do you have a link to AD research using this? 



#377 bladedmind

  • Guest
  • 16 posts
  • 6
  • Location:United States
  • NO

Posted 28 January 2019 - 12:33 AM

Re: Percepta

 

Maybe it is effective.  Wouldn't it be nice.  But I see some red flags.   The website is quite marketing-oriented and has occasional bad grammar.   https://perceptabrain.com/

 

They cite studies on cat's claw (uncaria tomentosa) and ECGC - the studies probably are worth a look (listed below but unexamined by me).  The product is reportedly a special blend of special extracts from those two substances. The formulators' publications on this approach are cited as forthcoming.  I ran the Amazon reviews of the product through fakespot.com -- as I suspected it graded the reviews with an F - totally fake.  

 

 

  1. Reinhard, K.H. Uncaria tomentosa (Wild) D.C.: cat’s claw, una de gato, or saventaro. J. Alter. Compliment. Med. 5:143-151, 1999.
  2. Muhammad, I., Khan, I.A., Fisher, N.H., and Fronczek, F.R. Two stereoisomeric pentacyclic oxindole alkaloids from Uncaria tomentosa: uncarine C and uncarine E. Acta Crystallog. C. 57:480-482, 2001.
  3. McCurley, D., Castillo, G.M. and Snow A.D. Therapeutic implications of PTI-00703®. Presentation at the 6th International conference, Amsterdam, July 18-23, 1998.
  4. Castillo, G.M., Cummings, J.A., and Snow, A.D. Further efficacy of PTI-00703®: A derivative from the amazon rain forest woody vine Uncaria tomentosa (cat’s claw) that is a potent inhibitor of beta-amyloid protein fibrillogenesis. Oral presentation at the 29th Annual Meeting Society for Neuroscience, Miami, Florida, Oct 23-28, 1999.
  5. Castillo, G.M., Kirchner, D.A., Yee, A.G., and Snow, A.D. Electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction studies confirm the efficacy of PTI-00703® (cat’s claw derivative) as a potent inhibitor of beta-amyloid protein fibrillogenesis. Oral Presentation at the World Congress 2000, Washington, DC, July 9-13, 2000.
  6. Castillo G.M., Kirschner D.A., Yee A.G., and Snow A.D. Electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction studies further confirm the efficacy of PTI-00703® (Cat’s claw derivative) as a potential inhibitor of beta-amyloid protein fibrillogenesis. The Proceedings of the 7th International Conference, edited by K. Iqbal, S.S. Sisodia, and B. Winblad, John Wiley & Sons, pp. 450-460, 2001.
  7. Snow et al. Identification of the natural plant Uncaria tomentosa (cat’s claw) and specific small molecule phenolic components identified within as potent inhibitors and disrupters of brain “plaques and tangles”: Potential for a new nutraceutical treatment for normal brain aging. In Press, 2018.
  8. Kuriyama, S., et al. Green tea consumption and cognitive function: a cross-sectional study from the Tsurugaya project. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 83:355-361, 2006.
  9. Ehrnhoefer, D.E. et al. EGCG redirects amyloidogenic polypeptides into unstructured, off- pathway oligomers. Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 15:558-566, 2008.
  10. Ng, T., Feng, L., Niti, M., Kua, E., and Yap, K. Tea consumption and cognitive impairment and decline in older Chinese adults. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 88:224-231, 2008.
  11. Rezai-Zadeh, K. et al. Green tea epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) reduces beta-amyloid mediated cognitive impairment and modulates tau pathology in mice. Brain Res. 1214:177-187, 2008.
  12. Hyung S., et al. Insights into anti-amyloidogenic properties of the green tea extract (-epigallocatechin-3-gallate) toward metal-associated amyloid-β species. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci.110:3743-3748, 2013.
  13. Wobst, H.J., Sharma, A., Diamond, M.I., Wanker, E.E., and Bieshke, J. The green tea polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin gallate prevents the aggregation of tau protein into toxic oligomers at substiochiometric ratios. FEBS Letters 589:77-83, 2015.


#378 Andey

  • Guest
  • 520 posts
  • 137
  • Location:Kiev, Ukraine

Posted 30 January 2019 - 07:58 AM

  New podcast come out recently from Peter Attia, maybe it would be interesting for the people here 

https://peterattiamd...cogonzalezlima/

In this episode, Francisco Gonzalez-Lima, a Professor of Neuroscience and Pharmacology & Toxicology, explains the vascular hypothesis of Alzheimer’s disease which says the central problem is a progressive neuronal energy crisis of impaired blood flow to the brain and impaired mitochondrial respiration. He walks us through the ways we can intervene in this process and also shares details of the exciting future of Alzheimer’s treatment and prevention.

 

   In the last year, I stumble on the often and often on the view that amyloid beta is not a root cause but more of a downstream effect of deteriorating brain. If I don't mistaken this guy and his team comes even further saying that amyloid beta accumulation of Alzheimer's patients doesn't differ from that of people without this diagnosis. He describes Alzheimer's causes pretty much in the vein of what various Turnbuckle protocols should address with removing tau as a cherry on a top.

 



#379 theobromananda

  • Guest
  • 53 posts
  • 12
  • Location:Northern Germany

Posted 30 January 2019 - 10:47 AM

 

In this episode, Francisco Gonzalez-Lima, a Professor of Neuroscience and Pharmacology & Toxicology, explains the vascular hypothesis of Alzheimer’s disease which says the central problem is a progressive neuronal energy crisis of impaired blood flow to the brain and impaired mitochondrial respiration.

 

This is definitely so in the case of my mother. She has developed migraines in a similar general time frame as mild Alzheimers symptoms - and those lessen considerably if she takes supplements which boost the mitochondria. I guess the mitochondrial protocol is next.



#380 v_squared123

  • Guest
  • 24 posts
  • 2
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 07 February 2019 - 10:35 PM

 

Hey Turnbuckle, what do you think of this? Its called Percepta. Developed by two neuroscientists to target the plaques and tangles using natural herbs.

 

http://perceptabrain.com/

 

https://www.amazon.c...d/dp/B078T3ZL9L

 

About the product
  • All natural plant-based supplement delivered in vegetarian capsules.
  • Developed by Dr. Alan Snow and Dr. Rudy Tanzi, two of the world’s leading brain aging researchers.
  • Backed by over 15 years of scientific studies and over 50 issued patents.
  • Proprietary blend of PTI-00703 cat’s claw from the Amazon rainforest and MemorTea from the mountains of China.
  • Delivers specific polyphenols that target brain “plaques and tangles” which is the real cause of normal age-related memory loss.

 

 

Yay or Nay?

 

 

 

Do you have a link to AD research using this? 

 

 

 

Re: Percepta

 

Maybe it is effective.  Wouldn't it be nice.  But I see some red flags.   The website is quite marketing-oriented and has occasional bad grammar.   https://perceptabrain.com/

 

They cite studies on cat's claw (uncaria tomentosa) and ECGC - the studies probably are worth a look (listed below but unexamined by me).  The product is reportedly a special blend of special extracts from those two substances. The formulators' publications on this approach are cited as forthcoming.  I ran the Amazon reviews of the product through fakespot.com -- as I suspected it graded the reviews with an F - totally fake.  

 

 

  1. Reinhard, K.H. Uncaria tomentosa (Wild) D.C.: cat’s claw, una de gato, or saventaro. J. Alter. Compliment. Med. 5:143-151, 1999.
  2. Muhammad, I., Khan, I.A., Fisher, N.H., and Fronczek, F.R. Two stereoisomeric pentacyclic oxindole alkaloids from Uncaria tomentosa: uncarine C and uncarine E. Acta Crystallog. C. 57:480-482, 2001.
  3. McCurley, D., Castillo, G.M. and Snow A.D. Therapeutic implications of PTI-00703®. Presentation at the 6th International conference, Amsterdam, July 18-23, 1998.
  4. Castillo, G.M., Cummings, J.A., and Snow, A.D. Further efficacy of PTI-00703®: A derivative from the amazon rain forest woody vine Uncaria tomentosa (cat’s claw) that is a potent inhibitor of beta-amyloid protein fibrillogenesis. Oral presentation at the 29th Annual Meeting Society for Neuroscience, Miami, Florida, Oct 23-28, 1999.
  5. Castillo, G.M., Kirchner, D.A., Yee, A.G., and Snow, A.D. Electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction studies confirm the efficacy of PTI-00703® (cat’s claw derivative) as a potent inhibitor of beta-amyloid protein fibrillogenesis. Oral Presentation at the World Congress 2000, Washington, DC, July 9-13, 2000.
  6. Castillo G.M., Kirschner D.A., Yee A.G., and Snow A.D. Electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction studies further confirm the efficacy of PTI-00703® (Cat’s claw derivative) as a potential inhibitor of beta-amyloid protein fibrillogenesis. The Proceedings of the 7th International Conference, edited by K. Iqbal, S.S. Sisodia, and B. Winblad, John Wiley & Sons, pp. 450-460, 2001.
  7. Snow et al. Identification of the natural plant Uncaria tomentosa (cat’s claw) and specific small molecule phenolic components identified within as potent inhibitors and disrupters of brain “plaques and tangles”: Potential for a new nutraceutical treatment for normal brain aging. In Press, 2018.
  8. Kuriyama, S., et al. Green tea consumption and cognitive function: a cross-sectional study from the Tsurugaya project. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 83:355-361, 2006.
  9. Ehrnhoefer, D.E. et al. EGCG redirects amyloidogenic polypeptides into unstructured, off- pathway oligomers. Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 15:558-566, 2008.
  10. Ng, T., Feng, L., Niti, M., Kua, E., and Yap, K. Tea consumption and cognitive impairment and decline in older Chinese adults. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 88:224-231, 2008.
  11. Rezai-Zadeh, K. et al. Green tea epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) reduces beta-amyloid mediated cognitive impairment and modulates tau pathology in mice. Brain Res. 1214:177-187, 2008.
  12. Hyung S., et al. Insights into anti-amyloidogenic properties of the green tea extract (-epigallocatechin-3-gallate) toward metal-associated amyloid-β species. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci.110:3743-3748, 2013.
  13. Wobst, H.J., Sharma, A., Diamond, M.I., Wanker, E.E., and Bieshke, J. The green tea polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin gallate prevents the aggregation of tau protein into toxic oligomers at substiochiometric ratios. FEBS Letters 589:77-83, 2015.

 

 

Amazon reviews aside ( can't really rely on amazon reviews as scientific evidence, right? ) I checked the website out some more:

 

https://perceptabrai...search-studies/

 

Disruption/Dissolution of Beta-Amyloid (1-42) “Plaque-like” Fibrils as Determined by a Number of Different In Vitro Studies

"Within 3 days, both PTI-00703® cat’s claw and Percepta™ can completely dissolve/disaggregate pre-formed “plaques” in a test tube as visualized by 1) loss of Congo red staining (i.e. loss of red/green birefringence as viewed under polarized light) 2) loss of Thioflavin S fluorescence (i.e. loss of fluorescence indicating disruption /disaggregation of beta-amyloid protein fibrils; and 3) loss of fibrils as visualized by negative stain electron microscopy; all validated markers for beta-amyloid fibril reduction and dissolution."

 

The Major Component of Percepta™ Prevents the Formation and Accumulation of Brain Plaques by 74-82% after Only 3 Months of Daily Treatment.

 

"Studies with genetically engineered mice that accumulate brain “plaques” as they age showed that the main plant-derived ingredients in Percepta™ cause a marked reduction and clearance of beta-amyloid protein containing plaques. This led to a marked improvement in memory as assessed by water maze testing, the gold standard for short-term memory and spatial recognition testing in mice. In addition, the main ingredients in Percepta™ also prevented new amyloid “plaque” formation by over 74-82% within 3 months of treatment."

 

A Specific Polyphenol within Percepta™ Reduced Brain “Plaques” by nearly 60% with an Improvement in Short-Term Memory (by nearly 60%) in Brain “Plaque-Producing Pre-clinical Animal Models.”

 

"In one study, the major polyphenolic component of Percepta™ was administered to older plaque-producing mice and within 3 months caused a marked reduction in brain plaque load (by 58.1%; p<0.001) and a concurrent improvement in short-term memory (by 57.8%; p<0.001) as assessed by Morris water maze and probe trials."

 

Bioavailability

"
In one independent study at Tulane University, the major polyphenolic components of PTI-00703® cat’s claw found in Percepta™ crossed the blood-brain-barrier and entered the brain tissue within 2 minutes after treatment. This study demonstrates that the polyphenolic ingredients of Percepta™ can rapidly enter the brain."

 

 

Human Clinical Trials Using Cat’s Claw for Improvement of Brain Health
"There are now a number of human clinical trials showing that the inner bark of cat’s claw (Uncaria tomentosa) improved memory, focus and concentration. In one study1, a total of 63 individuals between the ages of 18 and 35 years old in a randomized, double blind controlled trial showed significant improvements in verbal memory and executive function within 45 days of daily treatment of a formula containing ~25% cat’s claw (Uncaria tomentosa) bark."
 
There are loads of charts, diagrams and images on the product website. I dont know how to upload those pictures in a post but the I URL'd the link at the top of this post to those who want to see.
 
 

  • Off-Topic x 1

#381 v_squared123

  • Guest
  • 24 posts
  • 2
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 07 February 2019 - 10:49 PM

Obviously there are no human studies on this product but it seems interesting because it claims that the ingredient PTI-00703 which is a proprietary source of Cat's Claw inhibits and reduces plaques and tangles.

 

"Percepta with only two ingredients markedly inhibits and reduces “plaques and tangles” in a number of in vitro and animal model studies"

" the major PTI-00703® cat’s claw ingredient discovered by the Snow research teams, gets into the brain within two minutes after being in the blood"

 

"There is a remarkable synergistic effect by having the specific combination of PTI-00703®cat’s claw and MemorTea—which on their own can inhibit and reduce “plaques and tangles” "

 

https://perceptabrain.com/plant-based-ingredients/

 

 

 

 


  • Off-Topic x 1

#382 v_squared123

  • Guest
  • 24 posts
  • 2
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 07 February 2019 - 10:55 PM

Percepta Science Research Studies

 

https://perceptabrai...search-studies/

 

 

Cant upload the images but the link above shows everything


  • Off-Topic x 1

#383 v_squared123

  • Guest
  • 24 posts
  • 2
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 07 February 2019 - 11:05 PM

"Studies with genetically engineered mice that accumulate brain “plaques” as they age showed that the main plant-derived ingredients in Percepta™ cause a marked reduction and clearance of beta-amyloid protein containing plaques. This led to a marked improvement in memory as assessed by water maze testing, the gold standard for short-term memory and spatial recognition testing in mice. In addition, the main ingredients in Percepta™ also prevented new amyloid “plaque” formation by over 74-82% within 3 months of treatment."

 

Screenshot-2017-11-14-15.12.31.png

 

The Major Component of Percepta™ Prevents the Formation and Accumulation of Brain Plaques by 74-82% after Only 3 Months of Daily Treatment.

 

 

 


"In one study, the major polyphenolic component of Percepta™ was administered to older plaque-producing mice and within 3 months caused a marked reduction in brain plaque load (by 58.1%; p<0.001) and a concurrent improvement in short-term memory (by 57.8%; p<0.001) as assessed by Morris water maze and probe trials."

 

Screenshot-2017-11-14-15.38.13-e15137901

 

A Specific Polyphenol within Percepta™ Reduced Brain “Plaques” by nearly 60% with an Improvement in Short-Term Memory (by nearly 60%) in Brain “Plaque-Producing Pre-clinical Animal Models.”


In one independent study at Tulane University, the major polyphenolic components of PTI-00703® cat’s claw found in Percepta™ crossed the blood-brain-barrier and entered the brain tissue within 2 minutes after treatment. This study demonstrates that the polyphenolic ingredients of Percepta™ can rapidly enter the brain.

 

Screenshot-2017-11-14-15.43.54.png


Link: https://perceptabrai...search-studies/


  • Off-Topic x 1
  • Informative x 1

#384 v_squared123

  • Guest
  • 24 posts
  • 2
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 10 February 2019 - 10:11 AM

Landmark 'Scientific Reports' Paper Details the Discovery of a Specific Amazonian Rain Forest Plant Extract PTI-00703 Cat's Claw as a Potent Inhibitor and Reducer of Brain Plaques and Tangles

 

The manuscript pertains to the identification of a natural plant extract known as PTI-00703 cat's claw discovered to be a potent inhibitor and reducer of both brain plaques and tangles. A wide variety of different in vitro screening methods and brain plaque-producing transgenic mice were used. Reduction of brain plaque-load in plaque-producing transgenic mice correlated directly with marked improvements in short-term memory. The research also utilized sophisticated structural elucidation studies to identify specific polyphenolic components present in PTI-00703 cat's claw extract responsible for the inherent natural plaque and tangle inhibitory and reducing activity.

 

This paper is available by Open Online Access at the following URL: 

https://www.nature.c...598-019-38645-0

 

Paper Insights:

  • A specific Amazonian rain forest plant extract, known as PTI-00703 cat's claw (Uncaria tomentosa) has been identified as a potential alternative natural solution to inhibit and reduce both brain plaques and tangles
  • Brain aging includes the accumulation of beta-amyloid protein containing plaques and tau protein containing tangles that have been shown in numerous peer-reviewed publications to contribute to accelerated memory loss and cognitive decline
  • PTI-00703 cat's claw from the Amazon rain forest is extracted using a specific proprietary methodology resulting in the most robust form of cat's claw to effectively target brain plaque and tangle accumulation
  • PTI-00703 cat's claw is obtained from Uncaria tomentosa (one of 34 species of cat's claw) and represents the bark powder from the Amazon woody vine that grows up to 100 feet in length. The woody vine regrows after it is harvested thereby replenishing the source of this important plant
  • PTI-00703 cat's claw demonstrated both the ability to inhibit formation and reduce/dissolve beta-amyloid protein plaque fibrils and tau protein tangles. The dissolution in most cases occurred instantly
  • The main constituents of PTI-00703 cat's claw were shown to enter the brain within 2 minutes of being in the blood
  • A major polyphenol ingredient in PTI-00703 cat's claw (known as proanthocyanidin B2) reduced brain plaques in older transgenic mice by ~52-58% and in younger transgenic mice by ~74-83% over a 3-month period
  • Reduction of brain plaques in transgenic mice over this 3-month period also led to a marked ~58% improvement in short-term memory
  • The constituents in PTI-00703 cat's claw discovered to be responsible for the plaque and tangle inhibitory activity include specific polyphenols, known as proanthocyanidins. Proanthocyanidins are found in teas, red wine, grape seed extract, blueberries, cranberries, black berries, black currant, strawberries and cocoa beans
  • The mechanism of action elucidated in our paper includes PTI-00703 cat's claw main ingredients entering the brain rapidly; directly binding with beta-amyloid protein fibrils (in plaques) and tau protein twisting-filaments (in tangles). Studies also indicated that the major polyphenol ingredients in PTI-00703 cat's claw serve as a small wedge to unzip and unravel insoluble plaque fibrils and tau tangles, causing them to fall apart. The non-toxic resulting debris is then believed to be cleaned up by the scavenger cells of the brain (i.e. microglia) resulting in less plaques and tangles, thereby improving memory.

Future human clinical trials are needed to validate and confirm the results obtained from the various in vitro and in vivostudies reported in the present investigation

https://www.prnewswi...-300791643.html

I want to focus in on this bulletin:

  • PTI-00703 cat's claw demonstrated both the ability to inhibit formation and reduce/dissolve beta-amyloid protein plaque fibrils and tau protein tangles. The dissolution in most cases occurred instantly
  • The main constituents of PTI-00703 cat's claw were shown to enter the brain within 2 minutes of being in the blood

This compound, PTI-00703 cats claw, does follow the "dissolve and detoxify" theme of this thread. What do you guys think? Thoughts? Is it a legit contender to add to turnbuckles protocol? Or even try alone? 


Also, i noticed the article was presented by Congitive Clarity Inc which is the company behind the product. So its an obvious PR push however the points presented above were directly from the scientific study publushed by Nature.com "The international journal of science" guys. So i wouldn't immediately discredit the study as just a pr stunt. I dont know much about submitting studies to Nature.com or other science websites but, I would assume, there would have some level of scientific validity behind the paper that was submitted, reviewed, accepted and published. Right? Or perhaps someones pockets were lined up with green bills lol. 

 

Anyone care to share something on this? Legit? Fake? Not sure? 

 

 

Here is the link to the study: https://www.nature.c...598-019-38645-0


Edited by v_squared123, 10 February 2019 - 10:11 AM.


#385 William Sterog

  • Guest
  • 364 posts
  • 99
  • Location:Dos Hermanas
  • NO

Posted 10 February 2019 - 10:26 AM

Would this also combat the plaques in atherosclerosis?

In my experience, the other Cat Claw, Uncaria Rhynchophylla, is one of the best Nootropics out there.

https://www.longecit...t-you-can-take/

I linked four papers about UR and Alzheimer's there.

#386 Turnbuckle

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • 3,466 posts
  • 1,398
  • Location:USA
  • NO

Posted 10 February 2019 - 01:10 PM

Landmark 'Scientific Reports' Paper Details the Discovery of a Specific Amazonian Rain Forest Plant Extract PTI-00703 Cat's Claw as a Potent Inhibitor and Reducer of Brain Plaques and Tangles

 

 

Also, i noticed the article was presented by Congitive Clarity Inc which is the company behind the product. So its an obvious PR push however the points presented above were directly from the scientific study publushed by Nature.com "The international journal of science" guys. So i wouldn't immediately discredit the study as just a pr stunt. I dont know much about submitting studies to Nature.com or other science websites but, I would assume, there would have some level of scientific validity behind the paper that was submitted, reviewed, accepted and published. Right? Or perhaps someones pockets were lined up with green bills lol. 

 

 

 

 

There are definite signs of hucksterism in the marketing, and the authors of the Nature article report substantial financial interests--

 

Competing Interests
A.S. and R.T. declare competing financial interests. A.S. and R.T. own equity in Cognitive Clarity Inc. A.S. is a paid employee of Cognitive Clarity Inc.

 

 

 
That said, they do appear to be legitimate researchers. Thus one has to look at exactly what in this product is supposed to be so good.
 
PTI-00703 cat’s claw responsible for both the observed “plaque” and “tangle” inhibitory and reducing activity. Specific proanthocyanidins (i.e. epicatechin dimers and variants thereof) are newly identified polyphenolic components within Uncaria tomentosa that possess both “plaque and tangle” reducing and inhibitory activity. One major identified specific polyphenol within PTI-00703 cat’s claw was epicatechin-4β-8-epicatechin (i.e. an epicatechin dimer known as proanthocyanidin B2) that markedly reduced brain plaque load and improved short-term memory in younger and older APP “plaque-producing” (TASD-41) transgenic mice (bearing London and Swedish mutations). 

 

 

 
Epicatechins are known to have activity against Aβ--

In this study, an in vitro screen of dietary flavonoids in primary neurons led to the identification of (−)-epicatechin and epigallocatechin as potent (nanomolar) inhibitors of amyloidogenic APP processing. Studies in aged TASTPM transgenic mice showed that oral administration of (−)-epicatechin reduced Aβ pathology. This reduction was seen following 21 days of (−)-epicatechin treatment, the first time oral administration has been shown to be effective on such a short timescale.

 

 

However, the one post on the Amazon Percepta page relevant to an AD patient said there was no improvement--"We are at about day 40 and have seen no noticeable improvement to the dementia of a family member." Thus I'd say that this product as a stand alone treatment isn't going to work, at least at the recommended doses.
 
Epicatechins are known to improve memory. We discussed them here some five years ago. I tried Acacia Catechu and got a bit of caffeinated buzz, but not much else. Might be worth trying again. The chemical structure is very similar to quercetin, and quercetin also improves memory in aged mice and in humans with early stage AD --https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/27145228
 
Proanthocyanidin B2, the epicatechin dimer mentioned in the paper "that markedly reduced brain plaque load" is found in a number of herbal sources. Apples, for instance, and extracts of apple polyphenols might be interesting to try.  

Apple Procyanidins Suppress Amyloid β-Protein Aggregation 
Procyanidins (PCs) are major components of the apple polyphenols (APs)...In conclusion, apple PC acted as a potent suppresser of abnormal Aβ aggregation and a showed protective effect on neuronal survival in vitro. Since apple PC is a safe and an inexpensive food factor, it might be promising for long-term treatment. Our study suggests a novel activity of apple PC, further supporting the consideration of their use for either the prevention or treatment of Aβ aggregation associated with neurodegenerative disorders.

 

 

Proanthocyanidin B2 is also reported to promote hair growth.

Edited by Turnbuckle, 10 February 2019 - 01:17 PM.

  • WellResearched x 1
  • like x 1

sponsored ad

  • Advert
Click HERE to rent this advertising spot for BRAIN HEALTH to support LongeCity (this will replace the google ad above).

#387 v_squared123

  • Guest
  • 24 posts
  • 2
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted Yesterday, 09:50 PM

Cool. Thanks for that. So, yay or nay? Is it something one should add to the protocol in the "throw everything at it including the kitchen sink" approach? 

 

 

 

 

However, the one post on the Amazon Percepta page relevant to an AD patient said there was no improvement--"We are at about day 40 and have seen no noticeable improvement to the dementia of a family member." Thus I'd say that this product as a stand alone treatment isn't going to work, at least at the recommended doses.
 

 

Yes, i noticed this while i reviewed the amazon product page. Generally, i find amazon reviews unscientific and therefore unhelpful. A lot of folks throw 5-star reviews at things because of anything and everything. Shipping, cost, amazon rewards, amazon service, and if the product didnt give them any issues. Not exactly scientific right? But there the occassional helpful ones like you posted. 

 

I did, however, found some issues with the review. 

1. what kind of dementia did the family member have? AD is just type of dementia. The most common dementia but vascular dementia is very common in the eldery as well and the pathology of vascular of dementia is diffierent from AD ( if it is vascular) There are several types of dementia for those who dont know.

 

2. Did this individual continue to decline while receiving this product? or was this family member only indentifying for improvements? Would it be negative to say that this person could have showed no signs of improvement but also no signs of decline?

 

3. The directed dosage of the product two capsules and is intended for the "Healthy aging brain" Not someone who is already in a diseased state. So, it could be said, a higher dose would prove helpful. How high? Perhaps 4 capsules? or 2 capsules twice/day?

 

Also, these guys also claim, this variant of Cat's Claw, can also affect tau as well.

 

 

 

This paper is available by Open Online Access at the following URL: 

https://www.nature.c...598-019-38645-0

 

Paper Insights:

 

  • PTI-00703 cat's claw from the Amazon rain forest is extracted using a specific proprietary methodology resulting in the most robust form of cat's claw to effectively target brain plaque and tangle accumulation
  • PTI-00703 cat's claw demonstrated both the ability to inhibit formation and reduce/dissolve beta-amyloid protein plaque fibrils and tau protein tangles. The dissolution in most cases occurred instantly
  • The mechanism of action elucidated in our paper includes PTI-00703 cat's claw main ingredients entering the brain rapidly; directly binding with beta-amyloid protein fibrils (in plaques) and tau protein twisting-filaments (in tangles). Studies also indicated that the major polyphenol ingredients in PTI-00703 cat's claw serve as a small wedge to unzip and unravel insoluble plaque fibrils and tau tangles, causing them to fall apart. The non-toxic resulting debris is then believed to be cleaned up by the scavenger cells of the brain (i.e. microglia) resulting in less plaques and tangles, thereby improving memory.

 

 

Pretty neat to be shown it can do both.  Did you find anything on its claim for affecting tau? I ask because you didn't comment on that part. Not sure if you didn't come across anything or didn't look

 

Also, is there any similarity between HEPPS and Homotaurine? Do you know?


Edited by v_squared123, Yesterday, 09:51 PM.






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: aβ plaques, plaques, oleuropein, hepps, epps, taurine, tau

2 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 2 guests, 0 anonymous users