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Whisky seen as a nootropic

whisky scotch nootropics

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#1 panhedonic

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 07:58 AM


Most of you will find this a stretch, but let me explain: Scotch or bourbon, drunk in moderate to low doses, I find to be productive in a specific sense. Obviously it is a psychotropic drug, as it modifies the perception of impressions coming into one's consciousness: one feels different; no one can argue with that. What would make this into a nootropic, though, would be complying with an "intelligence" indicator or an otherwise positive mental capacity. In effect, I consider whisky to enable my mind to explore thoughts that otherwise I wouldn't. Whether these thoughts are useful, constructive or not, is a matter of debate and definitions, but I certainly consider them valuable just in terms of their variability or the fact that they are out of the ordinary.

Many times I read here the question regarding nootropics that would enhance creativity. I consider this substance as an agent that would allow me to vary somewhat from the "thunken path" :)

I consider this of considerable value. A bit like art: it would allow you to have impressions that otherwise you wouldn't.

But my question is: what is the pharmacokinetics of whisky? is it different than other types of alcohol? (i can certainly find a difference between, say, vodka, tequila and scotch) is it clear to the nootropic/life-extension community what alcohol in moderate doses does specifically to one's brain and ability to process conscious thinking or modify it's typical quality?

It should be obvious to you now that I'm not a scientist. i'm rather, very interested in phenomenology, or the understanding and formulation of what happens in one's conscious thought process. I see metabolic pathways and neural paths as useful tool towards a taxonomy of "impressions" or units of thought/emotion.

I apologize if this is not too clear. I must admit that I am currently under the influence of of the substance in question. :P
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#2 Tom_

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 01:07 PM

I had some witty remarks, sarcastic jokes and shit to say. Also some useful things and a few questions. < I'm a bit of an arse.

Anyway I'm taking phenibut and totally enjoying said substance. :D
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#3 manny

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 04:51 PM

How much do you take?

I always thought of taking a shot of vodka in the morning as I thought it might have a positive effect somehow, but was advised against it.
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#4 panhedonic

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 06:01 PM

I had some witty remarks, sarcastic jokes and shit to say. Also some useful things and a few questions. < I'm a bit of an arse.

Anyway I'm taking phenibut and totally enjoying said substance. :D



Why hold back?
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#5 manny

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 11:18 PM

How much do you take?


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#6 panhedonic

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 11:22 PM

Oh, sorry. I take 1-2 (short) shots, 2-3 times a week. If I go over the second shot, state intensifies, obviously, but not sure productivity does, as I am then not able to record my thoughts, or remember them sharply for that matter. Also, that's crossing to hangover territory for me, which is a big red flag.
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#7 manny

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 12:17 AM

So do you find your motivation goes up?

Or is your productivity from having these creative thoughts and not from having be motivated to do something?
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#8 kevinseven11

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 03:37 PM

Both wine and whiskey are safer than other forms of alcohol because they require less alcohol to get effects and thus less toxic reactants.
http://pubs.acs.org/....1021/jf030111s
I don't know if this is a dramatic effects, but it should be noticeable.
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#9 renfr

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 03:52 PM

Just a little bit then, then you get too drunk and lightheaded to focus on anything, at least that's my experience.
This may be because it alleviates a bit of the stress you have and therefore make you focus and retain information much more easily.
Personally I prefer using high dose magnesium to alleviate the stress as its deficiency is the main reason of stress and poor cognitive performance, alcohol will just cover the stress response and not truly hinder it.
Whisky, wine are safer than beer because of the lack of yeast infections but strong alcohols are more dangerous for your oesophagus and cause oesophagus cancer on long term if you drink them up down the hatch without dissolving them.
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#10 panhedonic

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 08:45 PM

Great tip, renfr, I'll try mega-dosing Mg see what happens. If I can replace alcohol, that'd be a great find.

@Manny: I don't get more productive per se, but I do get more creative and relaxed, which in turn let's me tackle certain types of problems. It's not a dopaminic motivation, it's more like getting obstacles out of the way for *certain* mode of thinking/acting.
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#11 renfr

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 10:06 PM

I take between 3000-4500mg magnesium citrate a day (500-700mg elemental magnesium), don't take such a dose at once, it must be spread over the day 3000mg per serving at once is okay.
I noticed that the butterflies in the stomach symptom which occurs during intense stress is alleviated a lot and it restored my focus and my cognitive abilities when I'm learning stuff in a stressful environment.
Adrenaline the main cause of stress does deplete magnesium and potassium.
Magnesium citrate is just plain enough, Scienceguy's has already shown that magnesium threonate (magtein) is a fraud.
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#12 panhedonic

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 04:43 AM

How long does Mg take to be felt? Booze takes like about one min, which is one of its strengths. (tight feedback loop, if there is one)

I hope this works. Do you think that Mg/K Malate will work? Potassium is said to be relaxing as well, I think, and I have bought quite a bit of powder that contains both.

If I could only find the herb/supp combo that would replace alcohol, with less side-effects, I'll be very happy....

Gotu Kola, Ashwaghandha, Taurine...Kava?

When will come the time where we can predict fairly clearly what to add to a concoction to produce a particular effect...?
Alcohol works for most people. Why aren't herbs that predictable?
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