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Interview with Cindy Jackson

cindy jackson model music star cosmetic surgery world record life extension youthful looks

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#1 Mind

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Posted 06 May 2013 - 09:52 PM


Yes.....that Cindy Jackson, who is also a big advocate for healthy life extension. More details and podcast coming soon.

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#2 Mind

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 06:08 PM

As always, I am putting out a request for any questions you might have for Ms. Jackson. Here is a short list I was considering thus far:


1. In your online biography you state that you felt you were meant to spread your wings beyond your home state of Ohio, at what point did that also become the effort to transform your image? Was there a specific event that made you think "I could do this!, I could make myself look young again"


2. What are the most difficult cosmetic procedures you have had to endure?


3. Do you have specialist doctors and professional trainers that help you maintain your youthful looks and vigor.


4. What types of things do you do (supplements, treatments) that could be classified more as rejuvenation or "youth maintenance" rather than just nipping & tucking.


5. What interesting new treatments/trends have you seen in the cosmetic surgery industry? (mainly interventions that are a bit more biologically/science-based, although newer/safer/effective body sculpting methods might be interesting as well)


I suspect there are a lot of other questions for the world record-holder for image transformation. Let me know.


#3 JBForrester

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 06:48 PM

This is great. Good for you, Mind, and cheers for letting us participate!

Here are mine:

1. With liposuction, studies have proven to show fat redistribution, as well as an increase of 13% in visceral fat. Did you notice any fat redistribution from one area to the next? For those who have experienced this, what would you recommend aside from proper diet and exercise (which most seem to abide by)? Can fat transfers help this?

2. What is your perspective on "early-maintenance" facelifts? How does the risk/reward ratio balance out in someone as young as 29 or 30 when undergoing a maintenance facelift? Why are so many doctors opposed to doing such a procedure at such a young age?

3. What things have you done in order to do your best to prevent any complications that arise from major surgeries, such as fat transfer (lumpiness/unevenness/fat not taking), facelift (major scarring/facial distortion/nerve damage), liposuction (unevenness/sag/necrosis), etc.?

4. You have managed to pull off plastic surgery without seemingly major complications. For those who weren't so lucky, what words of advice would you give them? Why is there so much media/public venom thrown at people who have endured botched plastic surgery, considering that it was not necessarily their fault (some even having gone to the most reputable doctors)?

#4 The Immortalist

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 09:57 PM

This is my question for her:

How did you get the money to do all of this?

Edited by The Immortalist, 19 May 2013 - 10:02 PM.

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#5 JBForrester

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 10:00 PM

How did you get the money to do all of this?


She got the money from inheritance when her father died and then from media publicity.
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#6 Mind

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Posted 20 May 2013 - 10:26 PM

Thanks so much for the additional questions. I will be sure to work them in to the interview.

#7 The Immortalist

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 12:50 AM

Thanks so much for the additional questions. I will be sure to work them in to the interview.


I have some more additional questions.
  • How acceptable do you think cosmetic surgery has currently become in our society as a whole?
  • Do you still think there is a long way to go before it becomes totally accepted?
  • What do you think of the term "plastic surgery"? It seems to me to be a very negative misnomer. Whoever made up the term seems to imply that those who get it done are "fake". I personally prefer to use the term cosmetic surgery since is a more accurate, neutral description. I agree that those who go too far tend to look fake but properly done cosmetic surgery produces natural results.
  • Do you ever envision a time in the future where getting complex cosmetic surgery will just be exactly like a girl wanting her ears pierced for example?
  • Do you think some cosmetic defects should be covered by insurance? There are many people in this world who experience bullying and discrimination for less then ideal features of their body and that causes emotional distress to the victim. Most if not all cosmetic procedures are not covered by insurance if it doesn't affect the function of the body part. For example should a girl with a giant nose who is bullied all the time because of it be able to get money from insurance to get nasal reduction surgery?

Edited by The Immortalist, 21 May 2013 - 12:57 AM.


#8 JBForrester

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 01:28 AM

Thanks so much for the additional questions. I will be sure to work them in to the interview.


I have some more additional questions.
  • How acceptable do you think cosmetic surgery has currently become in our society as a whole?
  • Do you still think there is a long way to go before it becomes totally accepted?
  • What do you think of the term "plastic surgery"? It seems to me to be a very negative misnomer. Whoever made up the term seems to imply that those who get it done are "fake". I personally prefer to use the term cosmetic surgery since is a more accurate, neutral description. I agree that those who go too far tend to look fake but properly done cosmetic surgery produces natural results.
  • Do you ever envision a time in the future where getting complex cosmetic surgery will just be exactly like a girl wanting her ears pierced for example?
  • Do you think some cosmetic defects should be covered by insurance? There are many people in this world who experience bullying and discrimination for less then ideal features of their body and that causes emotional distress to the victim. Most if not all cosmetic procedures are not covered by insurance if it doesn't affect the function of the body part. For example should a girl with a giant nose who is bullied all the time because of it be able to get money from insurance to get nasal reduction surgery?


The word "plastic" is not a negative misnomer. It is a descriptive term of what the type of surgery entails, which is simply to "(re)shape". Look up the word "plastic". Neurologists also use this term to describe the brain in something called "neuroplasticity" - (i.e. the brain's "plasticity" being it's ability to learn new things and re-map/-wire itself), which has become quite a popular discussion after Norman Doidge's book "The Brain That Changes Itself" was published in 2007.

#9 The Immortalist

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 01:40 AM

Thanks so much for the additional questions. I will be sure to work them in to the interview.


I have some more additional questions.
  • How acceptable do you think cosmetic surgery has currently become in our society as a whole?
  • Do you still think there is a long way to go before it becomes totally accepted?
  • What do you think of the term "plastic surgery"? It seems to me to be a very negative misnomer. Whoever made up the term seems to imply that those who get it done are "fake". I personally prefer to use the term cosmetic surgery since is a more accurate, neutral description. I agree that those who go too far tend to look fake but properly done cosmetic surgery produces natural results.
  • Do you ever envision a time in the future where getting complex cosmetic surgery will just be exactly like a girl wanting her ears pierced for example?
  • Do you think some cosmetic defects should be covered by insurance? There are many people in this world who experience bullying and discrimination for less then ideal features of their body and that causes emotional distress to the victim. Most if not all cosmetic procedures are not covered by insurance if it doesn't affect the function of the body part. For example should a girl with a giant nose who is bullied all the time because of it be able to get money from insurance to get nasal reduction surgery?


The word "plastic" is not a negative misnomer. It is a descriptive term of what the type of surgery entails, which is simply to "(re)shape". Look up the word "plastic". Neurologists also use this term to describe the brain in something called "neuroplasticity" - (i.e. the brain's "plasticity" being it's ability to learn new things and re-map/-wire itself), which has become quite a popular discussion after Norman Doidge's book "The Brain That Changes Itself" was published in 2007.


The vast majority of people don't know the etymology of the world plastic lol. When most people hear the word plastic surgery it makes people think of it being unnatural or fake. as if the person is made of plastic.

Edited by The Immortalist, 21 May 2013 - 01:41 AM.


#10 Mind

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 04:35 PM

I understand the origins of the word "plastic" and its intended use for cosmetic surgery practices, but I also see it as a negative connotation with most people, referring more to what TheImmortalist has described.

#11 niner

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 06:16 PM

Ask her what would be a good way to find a competent surgeon. What questions should you ask? What to watch out for?
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#12 Mind

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 06:52 PM

Ask her what would be a good way to find a competent surgeon. What questions should you ask? What to watch out for?


Shoot, sorry niner, you posted just after I was done with the interview. Those are great questions which were only briefly alluded to. She has her own list of surgeons around the world who she has personally vetted. Famous people, stars, rich people come to her for advice on which places are best for which procedures. I think she has a healthy consulting business in this regard.

#13 JBForrester

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 10:42 PM

I understand the origins of the word "plastic" and its intended use for cosmetic surgery practices, but I also see it as a negative connotation with most people, referring more to what TheImmortalist has described.


I think it's important to know the origin of any label however. True, plastic is quite an ironic term used for cosmetic surgery, considering the adjective is also a noun describing something "synthetic" or "artificial", i.e. Barbie-like. The media cleverly grabbed onto that metaphor, thus most people understand the term to be just what The Immortalist described.

On a side note, how did the interview go?

#14 Suirsuss

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Posted 22 May 2013 - 05:55 AM

my question would have been .. how aggressive is she in methods other than surgury to promote her youthful appearance?

Edited by Suirsuss, 22 May 2013 - 05:55 AM.


#15 VictorBjoerk

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Posted 22 May 2013 - 07:09 AM

When will the podcast come online?

#16 The Immortalist

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Posted 22 May 2013 - 05:10 PM

The only feature of her face now that looks unnatural to me is her lips. Her lips looked better before then after. She had nice delicate looking lips. Now she has mild trout lips.
Other then that she did a very good job in changing her face for the better.



Posted Image

#17 Mind

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 12:25 PM

File Name: LongeCityPodcast_Jackson2013.mp3
File Submitter: Mind
File Submitted: 26 May 2013
File Category: Podcasts
Guest: Cindy Jackson

An interview with Cindy Jackson discussing how looks affect attitudes, and how looking younger might also transition into real rejuvenation in the near future.

Click here to download this file

http://www.Longecity.org/media/LongeCityPodcast_Jackson2013.mp3

Edited by Mind, 26 May 2013 - 12:28 PM.

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#18 Mind

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 12:33 PM

my question would have been .. how aggressive is she in methods other than surgury to promote her youthful appearance?


She isn't too aggressive right now, mainly just practicing good stress management, eating a healthy diet (vegetarian, raw, organic), and taking a multi-vitamin/mineral, however, she is just beginning to promote and research more true rejuvenation. She is organizing an anti-aging conference in Sweden in October.

#19 Mind

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 01:05 PM

This is a longer interview (28 minutes) so I will let you know at what point she discusses some of the topics brought up in this thread.

Her history and how she makes her income, beginning around 1:29

About the doctors she knows, exercise practices, and diet/supplementation, beginning around 7:52

The liposuction/fat question comes in at 11:07

Her opinion on early maintenance face-lifts and botox, starting at 12:11

The insurance question and social views/stigmas associated with "plastic surgery", beginning around 13:27

Mentions Joan Rivers at 18:17 mark

At about the 20:00 mark she starts talking about how surprised she has been recently, with some of the stars she knows. They had procedures done, but the techniques are so good, she couldn't tell.

Discussing some new techniques in cosmetic surgery at around 22:00

She starts talking about her views on life extension around 25:37 and it really gets good around 26:38 (some very choice quotes for the LongeCity crowd!)

Edited by Mind, 26 May 2013 - 01:19 PM.


#20 advancedatheist

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 02:48 PM

How did you get the money to do all of this?


She got the money from inheritance when her father died and then from media publicity.


She got the money for her early cosmetic procedures from inheritance. I suspect she then earned money by capitalizing on her improved appearance as a kind of, er, "courtesan," among men in higher social circles.

At least I got that impression from the episode about her on A&E's series The Unexplained, titled "Human Transformations," which aired in the late 1990's. The same episode also features a stereotypical geek and loser from Central Casting who tried to organize his life around Star Trek. I came away from watching that episode respecting Cindy a lot more than the Trekker. They both picked fantasies for guiding their lives - the Barbie doll and Star Trek, respectively - but Cindy's fantasy bears more of a resemblance to something you could do in real life, and she worked diligently at making it as real as she could.

#21 JohnD60

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 04:23 PM

I think CJ is great. But in the interview CJ comments that the fat removed in Lipo suction does not come back in different areas. I think she is missing the point of the question. She may not have experienced that phenomeon, but fat cells do grow and I believe some people have a certain overall body fat ratio equilibrium, and that removing fat in one area is going to stimulate growth in other areas to reach that overall equilibrium.
The picture timeline reposted from her website is fascinating to me. To my eye the most improvement is from the following in order: nose reshaping, reduction in nasal labia folds (possibly the result of the max fax surgery and/or filler and/or something else), skin tone enhancement, skin tightening, hair/makeup, botox in forehead, under eye volume enhancement, a change in the angle of her eye brows. The actual change in bone structure is less dramatic than one would expect from one that claims to have held a world record on cosmetic surgeries/procedures. And, I do not think she is making that claim any longer.

Edited by JohnD60, 26 May 2013 - 04:23 PM.


#22 The Immortalist

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 09:25 PM

I think CJ is great. But in the interview CJ comments that the fat removed in Lipo suction does not come back in different areas. I think she is missing the point of the question. She may not have experienced that phenomeon, but fat cells do grow and I believe some people have a certain overall body fat ratio equilibrium, and that removing fat in one area is going to stimulate growth in other areas to reach that overall equilibrium.
The picture timeline reposted from her website is fascinating to me. To my eye the most improvement is from the following in order: nose reshaping, reduction in nasal labia folds (possibly the result of the max fax surgery and/or filler and/or something else), skin tone enhancement, skin tightening, hair/makeup, botox in forehead, under eye volume enhancement, a change in the angle of her eye brows. The actual change in bone structure is less dramatic than one would expect from one that claims to have held a world record on cosmetic surgeries/procedures. And, I do not think she is making that claim any longer.


For liposuction I will explain this in a simplified way that may or may not be correct since it is just my conjecture:

In this scenario the person eats 2000 calories a day. Now let's say the number of fat cells(adipocytes) in the abdominal region is 2million. If you remove 2million fat cells from the abdomen those fat cells are gone forever. However now there is going to be for example an extra 0.5 miilion in the hips, 0.5million in the chest and an extra 0.5million in both legs.
Since the number of calories the person eats has been enough to support 2 million full fat cells in the abdomen eventually more fat cells will be made elsewhere until the person has the same number again. No new adipocytes can be made in the abdomen now since there are none left to differentiate into new adipocytes.

The only noticeable change in bone structure is that she got her jaw angle reduced significantly.
Number 5 in this picture:
Posted Image

Edited by The Immortalist, 27 May 2013 - 09:46 PM.


#23 BLimitless

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 01:50 AM

I think personally that so much cosmetic surgery can hide defects in your diet. The skin is a good signal of the internal condition of the body. A lot of the minor desired results from surgery are attainable from being in truly splendid health. You would be surprised at how different a person could look and feel after being ill vs being maximally healthy; the skin glowing radiant with micronutrients.


From an aesthetic POV, it is assuredly amazing. Another form of art, like tattooing or body painting. The ability to literally draw your own face.

But in my opinion, one simply does not and cannot improve upon nature, except with its own synergisers. She looks very natural but if that were my S.O. I would be worried for her. Aging is a beautiful thing.
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#24 JohnD60

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 05:11 PM

The only noticeable change in bone structure is that she got her jaw angle reduced significantly.
Number 5 in this picture:

I noticed the jaw angle change, I felt that the reduction in jaw angle was mostly just normal bone loss due to aging (with some influence from the max fax surgery). I could be wrong of course.

#25 Adamzski

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 03:23 PM

She is the only person that has successfully fully beat outward aging that I have seen. Maybe she has a great "platform" for cosmetic surgery, people talk about this in Korea, it is kind of hard to explain but it is like judging someone on their scaffolding or ability to have cosmetic surgery, people say things like "oh her nose is no good for surgery" or "she could never remove enough bone from her cheeks"





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: cindy jackson, model, music star, cosmetic surgery, world record, life extension, youthful looks

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