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Government Pros and Cons

us constitution life extension government

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#1 capob

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Posted 20 July 2018 - 06:11 PM


Government presents both problems and solutions.  In many cases, government agencies will present a counterfactual stance on something, causing harm (food pyramid, emf), while at the same time providing a source to find the truth of the matters (pubmed.gov).

 

The direction government has intended to go is codex alimentarious - a list of approved supplements making everything else illegal.  

 

Our US lineage has been disturbed by the loss of fathers from the great war, and generations have lost an understanding of the dangers of government, and are demanding their rights be stripped (2nd amendment).

 

If you, as a non-billionaire, want to have access to life extension techniques of the future, you will probably have to ensure government does not succeed in its efforts towards a slave and elite class.

 

The relevant misconstruction of the constitution is the general welfare section : https://constitution...eneral-welfare/

 

But, I think the culture must change by first re-enforcing the 2nd : https://constitution.../2nd-amendment/


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#2 YOLF

  • Location:Delaware Delawhere, Delahere, Delathere!

Posted 03 August 2018 - 04:04 AM

Actually it looks like we've moved on to the MyPlate System as of 2011:

330px-USDA_MyPlate_green.svg.png

 

In any case, the government, especially ours is slow compared to our consumer expectations and we have lost quite a bit of knowledge in regards to the history of our food and diet. Preservatives are in everything, I've noticed that I don't experience the benefits of processed and preserved foods the same way that I experience the benefits of regular food. An example would be apple sauce with ascorbic acid and a peeled red delicious apple. The former leaves me feeling no benefit at all whereas the later just seems to have what I need. I think alot of the reason for this is the calorie system and the cold war practices of storing food. It's really complicated, food additives which might have made us skinny are no longer common because other industrial processes have produced food chemistry that has replaced it. What we actually need is a food history agency oslt which would be tasked with researching and understanding the evolution of our food and industry and which would endeavor to bring about change in the way that we eat.

 

I suppose the other thing is that foods have been redesigned to prevent or lessen disease pathologies and people don't understand which foods are for them. With a growing population of seniors, there's alot of food designed for their frailty, which young and healthy people shouldn't be eating.

 

Perhaps a trade in program for large plates and bowls and regulation as the size of the rest of the dishes could be implemented. 

 

And yes, the funding of civil militias would lead to training programs and more exercise. These would be a good idea. The government needs to pay for the guns etc. though... that's an expensive hobby.


Edited by YOLF, 03 August 2018 - 04:23 AM.


#3 capob

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Posted 07 August 2018 - 01:58 AM

Actually it looks like we've moved on to the MyPlate System as of 2011:

330px-USDA_MyPlate_green.svg.png

 

In any case, the government, especially ours is slow compared to our consumer expectations and we have lost quite a bit of knowledge in regards to the history of our food and diet. Preservatives are in everything, I've noticed that I don't experience the benefits of processed and preserved foods the same way that I experience the benefits of regular food. An example would be apple sauce with ascorbic acid and a peeled red delicious apple. The former leaves me feeling no benefit at all whereas the later just seems to have what I need. I think alot of the reason for this is the calorie system and the cold war practices of storing food. It's really complicated, food additives which might have made us skinny are no longer common because other industrial processes have produced food chemistry that has replaced it. What we actually need is a food history agency oslt which would be tasked with researching and understanding the evolution of our food and industry and which would endeavor to bring about change in the way that we eat.

 

I suppose the other thing is that foods have been redesigned to prevent or lessen disease pathologies and people don't understand which foods are for them. With a growing population of seniors, there's alot of food designed for their frailty, which young and healthy people shouldn't be eating.

 

Perhaps a trade in program for large plates and bowls and regulation as the size of the rest of the dishes could be implemented. 

 

And yes, the funding of civil militias would lead to training programs and more exercise. These would be a good idea. The government needs to pay for the guns etc. though... that's an expensive hobby.

 

It's not slow.  Rather, it's directed by non-consumer interests.

 

There are quite a lot of molecules that denature from heat of pasteurization or become oxidized and have differing effects on the body.

 

"need is a food history agency"

I think you missed the point of my post.  Ruthless people climb to the top and seek to cement their power by enfeebling others.  

 

"redesigned to prevent or lessen disease pathologies"

This is quite an overstatement.  High fructose corn syrup increases many disease pathologies to the point its use and subsidy might be seen as intentionally malicious.  Perhaps more accurate: food has been engineered to decrease contamination/growth, increase shelf life, increase heat stability, and decrease cost.

 

"Perhaps a trade in program for large plates and bowls and regulation as the size of the rest of the dishes could be implemented. "

Clearly the solution to all our problems is to regulate the size of utensils, ensuring no more  than 1/2 a teaspoon for spoons.

 

"And yes, the funding of civil militias would lead to training programs and more exercise."

That's exactly what I was getting at with the second amendment : more  exercise.



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