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receptors function database

receptors function database neurotransmitters receptors effects

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#1 ibtisam_midlet

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Posted 15 December 2019 - 02:46 AM


what is receptors function database:

info about what reaction will happen if you agonist/antagonist the receptors,
keep in your mind, the place of the receptor can make change of the receptor function, like agonizing adrenergic β2 receptor in the heart will cuss fast heart beat, and agonizing them in the brain will cuss urge to fight, by increasing reward for violence behaviors..
add to that this is just self gathering info for multiple source, as of what i understand in the over last years of testing, my info might be, wrong it's just will help you to know more about the general function of the receptor, thanks ☺

advantages:
-to colomens are colored for knowing its better to agonist the receptor or antagonist it
-link for source are available (to read  where i got this info)
-androgynous effinity to the receptors are available
-this data will always updated with new info in my blog, because i never got boring from exploring ☺✌
-free

preview:

green: in (whats will happen if) row mean i not sure about the info in that colomen, in (receptor) row mean transporter
blue: mean sure, better to agonisted
red: better to be antagonisted
yellow: just additional info
auto-receptor: the receptor that product negative feedback mean it will decrease the release of it's androgynous neurotransmitter
anti-target: pharmacy companies (eg, Eli Lilly) ignore always make sure their drugs doesn't interact with that receptor because she cuss problems
 
receptors%2Bfunction%2B2019-12-12.png

how to use:

online: for android users use google sheets for android
for IOS  users use google sheets for ios
for desktop use this link for google docs (it will open the app in android)
that link will changed when new version maked
offline:
 
run it with excel (the best experience)

 


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#2 yowza

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Posted 15 December 2019 - 06:04 AM

I think this idea is very useful.  What software did you use to format those images may I ask?  It's very succinct and cleverly done.

 

As maybe a sequel to this, I think compensatory mechanisms could be added.  We all know certain types of agonists tend to de-sensitize receptors while certain types of antagonists tend to maybe encourage a compensatory mechanism to come into play...

 

I don't want to make any statements on this quite yet but if you have more info. in this regard it would be interesting to see as well.


Edited by yowza, 15 December 2019 - 06:15 AM.


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#3 ibtisam_midlet

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Posted 15 December 2019 - 06:31 AM

I think this idea is very useful.  What software did you use to format those images may I ask?  It's very succinct and cleverly done.

 

As maybe a sequel to this, I think compensatory mechanisms could be added.  We all know certain types of agonists tend to de-sensitize receptors while certain types of antagonists tend to maybe encourage a compensatory mechanism to come into play...

 

I don't want to make any statements on this quite yet but if you have more info. in this regard it would be interesting to see as well.

 

Do you mean HT2A receptors antagonist? I know they lead to desenistation.

>>https://en.m.wikiped...5-HT2A_receptor

but for complicated cus, it's limited and there an unlimited upregulation to opposite some of that effect.

 

Your idea need an other database for drugs/receptor interaction with I already have :), but it's experimental with a lot of bugs, so it's for personal use for now, might I will develop it for public some day.



#4 yowza

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Posted 15 December 2019 - 08:07 AM

Do you mean HT2A receptors antagonist? I know they lead to desenistation.

>>https://en.m.wikiped...5-HT2A_receptor

but for complicated cus, it's limited and there an unlimited upregulation to opposite some of that effect.

 

Your idea need an other database for drugs/receptor interaction with I already have :), but it's experimental with a lot of bugs, so it's for personal use for now, might I will develop it for public some day.

 

 

I'd be interested in seeing that.

 

I read about the drug Memantine lately pertaining to NMDA receptors.  It's supposedly an "uncompetitive antagonist" unlike "noncompetitive antagonists". 

 

I will dig some past research up on the subject before commenting further but I think I recall hearing that pertaining to the NMDA system the medication stabilizes the Glutamergic system to an extent (important to avoid uneven brainwaves or excitotoxicity as I recall) while also enhancing cognition in some individuals pertaining to evening out the Glutamergic system with some potential offlabel usages.  Downside of course is NMDA isn't the only receptor it hits of course so not advocating for it yet (other receptors besides NMDA may trigger in maybe not the same way).

 

In any case, I like the table graph that you have going.  There's so many aspects to "Pharmacomodulation" I've attached a few tables from Wikipedia (yeah, I know it's not the best source but I like the tables at the bottom of the pages) for reference sake.  Your table though gets into a lot more specifics though pertaining to the "receptor" category that perhaps could provide added insight to this file (the part ranging from agonist, partial agonist, antagonist, PAM, and NAM) and the types of "agonists" and "antagonists" as seen in 2nd attached file.  Whether the body desensitizes the receptor or upregulates in response to how a receptor is interacted with I think is a key downstream question.

 

Too many medications have complex profiles not targeting just 1 receptor (let alone Ki Constants) so still pretty difficult to distinguish what works and what doesn't even with everything put out in table format but it's certainly helpful as a reference point.

 

Thanks for the information you posted.

Attached Files


Edited by yowza, 15 December 2019 - 09:07 AM.


#5 ibtisam_midlet

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Posted 15 December 2019 - 09:37 AM

I'd be interested in seeing that.

 

I read about the drug Memantine lately pertaining to NMDA receptors.  It's supposedly an "uncompetitive antagonist" unlike "noncompetitive antagonists". 

 

I will dig some past research up on the subject before commenting further but I think I recall hearing that pertaining to the NMDA system the medication stabilizes the Glutamergic system to an extent (important to avoid uneven brainwaves or excitotoxicity as I recall) while also enhancing cognition in some individuals pertaining to evening out the Glutamergic system with some potential offlabel usages.  Downside of course is NMDA isn't the only receptor it hits of course so not advocating for it yet (other receptors besides NMDA may trigger in maybe not the same way).

 

In any case, I like the table graph that you have going.  There's so many aspects to "Pharmacomodulation" I've attached a few tables from Wikipedia (yeah, I know it's not the best source but I like the tables at the bottom of the pages) for reference sake.  Your table though gets into a lot more specifics though pertaining to the "receptor" category that perhaps could provide added insight to this file (the part ranging from agonist, partial agonist, antagonist, PAM, and NAM) and the types of "agonists" and "antagonists" as seen in 2nd attached file.  Whether the body desensitizes the receptor or upregulates in response to how a receptor is interacted with I think is a key downstream question.

 

Too many medications have complex profiles not targeting just 1 receptor (let alone Ki Constants) so still pretty difficult to distinguish what works and what doesn't even with everything put out in table format but it's certainly helpful as a reference point.

 

Thanks for the information you posted.

 

i know that wikipedia table im advanced More than you can imagine *-*
 
I like your knowledge it's rare to find Someone with this interests.
 
if you accept, I can show you the other database, it's bigger and have a lot of info even affinity selectivity + competitive/partial/invest agonist etc + enzyme inhibition + half-life etc..
 
we can develop it together, it will be so much fun :)
if you have the time and motivation
we will motivate each other
I can share you the blog site, and I'm a Java script developer, so we will put that database in it,we will help increasing the speed of humans in developing new non-tolerance antidepressant, and maybe some day we will earn some $$ from it
 
what's your reaction??


#6 yowza

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Posted 15 December 2019 - 11:34 PM

Thanks,
 
I'd be interested in providing what input I can towards this centralized resource.  I can look at the database you've posted along with the other database you mentioned and I can try and come up with some suggestions.
 
The Wikipedia tables I find useful to to save time more than anything pertaining to broad generalities that may help with categorizing moreso than specifics and would of course cross check everything.
 
In terms of antidepressants, I have done some reading pertaining to receptor sensitization a few years back but just remember the basics but can pull some of the specific details up as well as I remember saving a couple articles pertaining to this.  Mainly, I recall reading about how the reason SSRI's take a few weeks before side effects lessen and positive effects are realized is because certain 5HT receptors need to desensitize over the first few weeks so it's a good thing for some desensitization to occur to get the desired effects in the first place.  
 
That being said, in terms of the effects of an SSRI dwindling after taking a larger dose over a longer period of time (something I wouldn't be able to tolerate side effect wise) I also recall reading how some people with Major Depression taking higher dosages have reported feeling a dwindling effect (but it takes a while due to re-uptake mechanism behind it from what I can tell).  If this happens, I've read partial agonist action on particular 5HT receptors (like 5ht1a) I know helps somewhat but something like Buspar with an SSRI I think is just overkill unless really used to SSRI's and immune to side effects.  
 
My impressions on some of the newer SSRI/5HT receptor Agonist combo drugs (like Vilozodone or Vortioxetine) are way too much in terms of negative side effect profile.  They're advertised as being purportedly lower in side effects which I think isn't necessarily true and moreso applies to people who've become desensitized to SSRI's or been taking a very high dosage cause I've tried SSRI's in the past for brief periods and found not combining with other mechanisms of action to be best as there's enough negative side effects from SSRI's even after given it a few weeks at set steady lowest possible starting dosage to experience the benefits.
 
Pertaining to the Serotonin ligand and associated receptors, I think it would be interesting to learn more in regards to upstream mechanism to upregulate Serotonin via compensatory mechanisms without directly inhibiting re-uptake of the 5HT receptor and/or enzymes associated with the 5HT ligand.  
 
On a somewhat unrelated note, the Sigma receptor I've noticed there's no rhyme or reason for why certain substances (completely unrelated in terms of mode of action) seem to hit this receptor.  I'm going out on a limb here in terms of wondering if this receptor promotes cross hemispheric integration via ion channel gating but without as broad of an anticonvulsant effect that may help with migraine and/or head tension perhaps.  So that's an interesting area to look as well.  
 
Overall, I think there's lots of interesting avenues of research that can come about through a strong centralized resource database for reference purposes.
Feel free to e-mail me or reply back however you wish and we can get going on this.

Edited by yowza, 15 December 2019 - 11:40 PM.


#7 yowza

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Posted 17 December 2019 - 05:34 AM

I might of gotten ahead of myself a bit in terms of 1st I will need to more so understand the goal in mind for any additional database being made (not suggesting changing anything on your current one).    

 

Also, in terms of help it would mainly just be me giving some feedback or look into something stop and go as I'm pretty limited lately and pretty much just stopped by the forums again just to look over what everyone here is talking about now days and my focus may be limited more so than perhaps it once was.  Still, feel free to question anything I say as I put it out more so based on what I remember reading and personal experience (my goals and how I may respond to some substances may be totally different of course).

 

 


Edited by yowza, 17 December 2019 - 06:25 AM.


#8 ibtisam_midlet

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Posted 18 June 2020 - 03:08 AM

just made a new improved version what is receptors function database:
info about what reaction will happen if you agonist/antagonist the receptors,
keep in your mind, the place of the receptor can make change of the receptor function, like agonizing adrenergic β2 receptor in the heart will cause fast heart beat, and agonizing them in the brain will cause urge to fight, by increasing reward for violence behaviors..
add to that this is just self gathering info for multiple source, as of what i understand in the over last years of testing, my info might be, wrong it's just will help you to know more about the general function of the receptor, thanks ☺

advantages:
-to columns are colored for knowing its better to agonist the receptor or antagonist it
-link for source are available (to read  where i got this info)
-androgynous affinity to the receptors are available
-this data will always updated with new info in my blog, because i never got boring from exploring ☺✌
-free
preview:
green: in (whats will happen if) column mean = I'm not sure about the info in that cell
in (receptor) column mean = transporter.
blue: in (whats will happen if) column mean = I'm sure.
in (receptor) column mean = better to agonist.
red:in (receptor) column mean = better to be antagonist.
yellow: just additional info
auto-receptor: the receptor that product negative feedback mean it will decrease the release of it's androgynous neurotransmitter
anti-target: pharmacy companies (eg, Eli Lilly) always make sure their drugs doesn't interact with that receptor because she cause problems

2020-3-14-1.png
how to use:
online: for android users use google sheets for android
for IOS  users use google sheets for ios
for desktop use this link for google docs (it will open the app in android)
that link will changed when new version made
offline:
 
run it with excel (the best experience)


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#9 DividedMind2008

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Posted 22 June 2020 - 04:03 PM

This is great. Thank you so much for this.

What would be better is knowing what drugs typically attach to which receptor and what affect they have.

So if "zyprexa' is a D2A (for example) antagonist - we could look up on the chart to see what the desired effect is supposed to be....

 

Thanks again.

Chris







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: receptors function, database, neurotransmitters, receptors effects

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