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Sulforaphane and Nicotinamide Riboside: The best combination for maximizing AMPK and the SIRTULINS?

sulfora sulforaphane nicotinamide riboside nad+ sirt1 ampk nrf2 pgc1a bioavailability potency

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#1 mrkosh1

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 02:43 AM


Hello Everyone,

 

I'm very tired tonight due an exhausting day, but I want to get this thread up.

 

In the past, I've posted about the idea of combining Nicotinamide Riboside and R-Alpha Lipoic Acid to synergistically not only increase the activity or SIRT1 (due to higher NAD+ levels) but also increase the quantity of SIRT1 in the cell (which alpha lipoic acid does). With these two together, I hypothesized the total anti-aging impact from SIRT 1 could possibly be far higher than with either alone.

 

However, I've now discovered there is another compound that utilizes the same mechanism as R-ALA to induce SIRT1 and the cascading results including PGC1a activation which then goes on to increase the production of telomerase. This mechanism is AMPK. According to a paper I'll post a link to in a minute, sulforaphane induces AMPK (which then activates NRF2, SIRT1, increases NAD+) as much lower concentration than ANY OTHER NATURAL PLANT SUBSTANCE -- including resverotrol, curcumin, and silimarin.

 

Sulforaphane has the HIGHEST ability to induce AMPK and does so at the LOWEST concentrations.

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC4736808/

 

Basically, the above paper makes Sulforaphane seem to be the only plant substance that has a serious chance at producing in-vivo results with amounts that could potentially be eaten on a daily basis.

 

You might say, "Well, people eat broccoli all the time!"

 

Not only does broccoli have lower Sulforaphane than broccoli sprouts, but simply cooking broccoli for even a few minutes DESTROYS sulforaphane. That means in all my years of occasionally eating broccoli, I've consumed nearly no sulforaphane.

 

Also, it is interesting to note that the precursor of sulforaphane must be combined with another chemical in broccoli to create sulforaphane. For this to happen, the chemicals must be crushed and mixed. This can take place via chewing or blending the sprouts.

 

Interestingly, on the Self Hacked website, the author indicates that he gets a HUGE effect from consuming blended broccoli sprouts. He compares it to consuming 700mg of R-ALA, but better. He claims the effect is so strong he only does it every so often.

 

Now, I propose that if we were to ask researchers to study any anti-aging combination, it should be Sulforaphane and Nicotinamide Riboside. The combination could potentially produce EXTREMELY synergistic results.

 

Here are a few of my questions for those who have more knowledge than myself.

 

Some people seem to doubt that there are any effective sulforaphane supplements. They suspect that the supplements may have little actual sulforaphane and that potentially only the precursor is present. For this reason, I'm interested in potentially growing broccoli sprouts and mixing them in a blender.

 

- If I were to plant a huge number of sprouts and blend them all at once, would freezing the resulting slurry protect the sulforaphane from decomposition? According to the article above, sulforaphane can decompose in a matter of several days after broccolli or sprouts are exposed to open air after harvesting.

 

- Is there a home method of extracting pure sulforaphane (or a purer extract) from the sprouts? For example, users of marijuana extract THC from plants via a number of different methods, including simple solvents such as vodka. Due to the very low breakdown temperature of sulforaphane, I doubt heat would work.

 

- Does anyone know of any particular varieties of broccoli that are higher in sulforphane than others? I would want to purchase the seeds that would yield the highest levels of sulforphane when sprouted.

 

- Are there any modern high tech tricks (that are fairly cheap) for maximizing yield? Using bottles as vessels to grow in seems very low tech and could be optimized greatly. Would any glass container with a glass top work? Or even a plastic top for that matter? For example, since the sprouts won't grow very tell, I'm imagining a very wide food platter with glass lid that can be placed on top.

 

I'm excited about the sulforaphane and nicotinamide riboside combination. I think that the results could be more powerful than any current pharmaceutical on the market.


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#2 sthira

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 03:26 AM

Good post! ❤️

So I'm sure you've seen Rhonda Patrick's epic YouTube (and podcast) on sulforaphane and broccoli sprouts? She's wonderful : https://youtu.be/zz4YVJ4aRfg

Regarding cooking cruciferous vegetables (and possibly deactivating sulforaphane), Dr Greger digs out that if we add mustard seed (even very humble amounts) to cooked cruciferous vegs that the spice may reactivate the enzymes for sulforaphane: https://youtu.be/wsN8x0BWcyE

Haha, maybe I'm a sucker but I've been adding mustard seed daily now to my cooked cruciferous, and maybe the heavens of immortality will soon part. Incidentally, I think if you steam broccoli then eat it atop a bed of another raw cruciferous (arugula, watercress...) this may also help with the sulforaphane.

- If I were to plant a huge number of sprouts and blend them all at once, would freezing the resulting slurry protect the sulforaphane from decomposition? According to the article above, sulforaphane can decompose in a matter of several days after broccolli or sprouts are exposed to open air after harvesting.


I just pick my crop and eat it fresh. They grow like crazy, and eating broccoli sprouts literally takes no time to prepare -- like two minutes? I don't drink them in a smoothie, though, rather I put about 150/g in a bowl, then add mustard seed, pepper, and a can of tomato sauce and some chia seeds. Probably no one but freaky me finds this combo wonderful and delicious, and I think there's even high flying science in the idea of eating tomato products together with cruciferous veggies for synergy --particularly regarding prostate health.

- Are there any modern high tech tricks (that are fairly cheap) for maximizing yield? Using bottles as vessels to grow in seems very low tech and could be optimized greatly. Would any glass container with a glass top work? Or even a plastic top for that matter? For example, since the sprouts won't grow very tell, I'm imagining a very wide food platter with glass lid that can be placed on top.

Yes. I just use a half dozen mason jars with sprouting lids. Rinse the seeds a few times a day, drain the water, tilt it at a downward angle so your little seeds will dry out and not rot. Store them somewhere dark and cool, and in a few days witness the beautiful miracle of life.

Broccoli sprouts are very easy to grow, they're adorable little plants, and eating them makes me happy. A quick YouTube search will set you on your journey.

Regarding NR, I'm still not convinced it's not hype. It's expensive B3, and can't we get the same wowza attributes from ordinary old nicotinic acid? Niacin flush I find relaxing just before sleep. And about NR, it makes me furious that chromadex jacked up their prices based on incomplete evidence (NR was much cheaper a few years ago -- greedy bastards..)

Edited by sthira, 04 January 2017 - 04:22 AM.

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#3 BieraK

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 08:34 AM

Another option is to use Sulforaphane and Niacinamide (Nicotinamide)... I used Niacin last year but I did not like it, I need to consume it spaced from the meals, otherwise I feel discomfort if I eat fats or some refined carbohydrate.

PD: For Nrf2 induction Andrographis Paniculata is one of the best herbs out there in doing that job here you have two studies. 
I'm a big fan of intermittent fasting, consuming "supplements" on an empty stomach (fasted state, I skip breakfast) with a cup of tea is a habit for me, apparently Sulforaphane is going to be a new acquisition, for now Grape Seed extract (varicose veins prevention) and Andrographis and Aloe Vera extract (Collagen production) are my breakfast :).... and low dose Methylene Blue (10 mg) since it can cross easily the BBB, activates Sirt1 and AMPK.

https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/23146110
https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC5034653/
 


Edited by BieraK, 04 January 2017 - 08:51 AM.

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#4 Junk Master

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 02:36 PM

Good post!  Just bought myself some broccoli seeds and will try adding them to my daily smoothie and to a salad.  I already take Niacin. 



#5 Werper

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 03:41 PM

The only thing I don't like about broccoli sprouts is that they're estrogenic.



#6 stefan_001

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 04:02 PM

Great discussion. There are many sulforaphane supplements so those are not active?

 


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#7 mrkosh1

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 08:58 PM

Great discussion. There are many sulforaphane supplements so those are not active?

 

That is a very good question. The paper I linked to makes it seem like many claimed sulforaphane supplements may only contain the non-activated precursor or may include sulforaphane at very low doses. Another question that comes to my mind is if sulforaphane would even survive for months sitting on a shelf or in a hot UPS truck.

 

If someone knows of a sulforaphane supplement that has been tested by multiple parties to confirm its authenticity and provides a significant dose of sulforaphane I'd be very interested. In my opinion, the combination of sulforaphane and nicotinamide riboside could be the most potent on the market. Simply put, there are many people who have claimed amazing things about many plant compounds. Take curcumin for example. I myself have taken curcumin in the past (LEF brand) and have felt its anti-anxiety and anti-inflammation effects. However, this paper indicates that even when procedures are performed to make curcumin better absorbed, it is still no where close to as bioavailable as sulforaphane. On the scale used in the paper, curcumin and most other natural plant based compounds have about a one or a two in bioavailability. But Sulforaphane is up around 80!



#8 mrkosh1

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 09:12 PM

Good post! ❤️

So I'm sure you've seen Rhonda Patrick's epic YouTube (and podcast) on sulforaphane and broccoli sprouts? She's wonderful :

Regarding cooking cruciferous vegetables (and possibly deactivating sulforaphane), Dr Greger digs out that if we add mustard seed (even very humble amounts) to cooked cruciferous vegs that the spice may reactivate the enzymes for sulforaphane:

Haha, maybe I'm a sucker but I've been adding mustard seed daily now to my cooked cruciferous, and maybe the heavens of immortality will soon part. Incidentally, I think if you steam broccoli then eat it atop a bed of another raw cruciferous (arugula, watercress...) this may also help with the sulforaphane.
 

- If I were to plant a huge number of sprouts and blend them all at once, would freezing the resulting slurry protect the sulforaphane from decomposition? According to the article above, sulforaphane can decompose in a matter of several days after broccolli or sprouts are exposed to open air after harvesting.


I just pick my crop and eat it fresh. They grow like crazy, and eating broccoli sprouts literally takes no time to prepare -- like two minutes? I don't drink them in a smoothie, though, rather I put about 150/g in a bowl, then add mustard seed, pepper, and a can of tomato sauce and some chia seeds. Probably no one but freaky me finds this combo wonderful and delicious, and I think there's even high flying science in the idea of eating tomato products together with cruciferous veggies for synergy --particularly regarding prostate health.

- Are there any modern high tech tricks (that are fairly cheap) for maximizing yield? Using bottles as vessels to grow in seems very low tech and could be optimized greatly. Would any glass container with a glass top work? Or even a plastic top for that matter? For example, since the sprouts won't grow very tell, I'm imagining a very wide food platter with glass lid that can be placed on top.

Yes. I just use a half dozen mason jars with sprouting lids. Rinse the seeds a few times a day, drain the water, tilt it at a downward angle so your little seeds will dry out and not rot. Store them somewhere dark and cool, and in a few days witness the beautiful miracle of life.

Broccoli sprouts are very easy to grow, they're adorable little plants, and eating them makes me happy. A quick YouTube search will set you on your journey.

Regarding NR, I'm still not convinced it's not hype. It's expensive B3, and can't we get the same wowza attributes from ordinary old nicotinic acid? Niacin flush I find relaxing just before sleep. And about NR, it makes me furious that chromadex jacked up their prices based on incomplete evidence (NR was much cheaper a few years ago -- greedy bastards..)

 

 

1) I will watch those videos.

 

2) After the sprouting phase starts, do you still rinse the sprouts until they have reached the optimum size? I'm confused about this part.

 

3) To maximize the amount of sprouts produced per spoonful of seeds (seeds seem a little expensive so I want to waste as little as I can) would it not make more sense to grow them on a flat area with greater surface area so each seed would have more room to grow? It seems to me that having them crowded in a bottle would result in suboptimal growth because they would be so crowded together.

 

4) NR is not hype. The scientific evidence proves that it raises NAD+ levels in the body. The only question is just how effective it will be. Obviously, there are enough people taking it that we know it does not cause rapid age reversal in most people -- although it may be producing a more slow reversal or help various disease conditions. I think the combination of NR with Sulforaphane would produce more of a benefit and here is why.

 

- AMPK stimulates NRF2 among TONS of other genes including the SIRTS. One gene it stimulates produces a molecule that recycles used NAD+ and turns it back into NAD again. So with Sulforaphane and NAD in combination, you would not only be giving your cells more raw material to make NAD+ but you would actually be recycling it more often. The result would be even higher levels of NAD+.

 

- AMPK stimulates NRF2. From my reading, NR doesn't stimulate NRF2 to any significant degree. What's interesting about NRF2 is that it has benefits that go beyond what increased NAD could provide. For example, there are anti-cancer drugs that are/were based on inducing NRF2. Most of the claimed benefits of curcumin are due to the stimulation of AMPK and NRF2. The NRF2 can help clear out malformed proteins out of brain cells.

 

 


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#9 mrkosh1

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 11:56 PM

I have been studying this topic further this evening.

 

First of all, I'd like to say that Rhonda Patrick is AWESOME and her video is AWESOME. I am going to be watching more of her videos. In particular, she has a short video where she discusses how very brief heating with hot water (NOT BOILING) of around 60 degrees C for a few minutes can deactivate an alternate enzyme that can convert the precursor into an INACTIVE form of sulforaphane. So, basically, this alternate enzyme is destroyed at a temperature LOWER than the enzyme that converts the precursor into sulforaphane. This can optimize the production of the ACTIVE form of sulfraphane by THREE FOLD. She uses a thermometer to measure the temperature of water in her kettle and then pours it over her broccoli sprouts.

 

Secondly, I've learned that pre-blending or mashing of the sprouts are a good idea. This gives the pre-cursor and the GOOD enzyme with want the chance to mix together. One doctor on Youtube suggests after you perform this you should allow them to sit for forty minutes before consumption.

 

Thirdly, mustard seed has the same enzyme that can transform the precursor into sulforaphane. By mixing ground mustard seed into blended sprouts, you can make sure there is plenty of pre-cursor available.

 

So far I've learned of THREE stages to maximize sulforaphane.

 

1) Pre-heat to 60C for a few minutes.

2) Add ground mustard seed.

3) Blend together and allow to rest for 40 minutes.

 

https://m.youtube.co...Ejy36uevsq722c=

 

https://m.youtube.co...PiL6fDJioafzwE=

 

Now, here are some further questions that I have not yet resolved.

 

- Are there certain subspecies of broccoli that have higher levels of sulforaphane than others? (Or I should say higher levels of the pre-cursor and enzyme.)

- Is there a way to extract the sulforaphane from the broccoli slurry after blending? For example, straining the liquid from the pulp?

- What does mustard seed taste like? Is it nasty?

- Are there any nutrients that I can give the sprouts while they are growing that will optimize levels of the precursor?

 

I'm really excited about the combination of nictonimide riboside and Sulforaphane. We have two VERY potent supplements that may synergize together in a very powerful way.

 

 


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#10 Richard McGee

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 02:28 AM

The bioavailability of sulforaphane from commercially available glucoraphanin supplements is equal to that observed from broccoli sprouts, says a study from Johns Hopkins University (JHU) School of Medicine.

 

http://journals.plos...al.pone.0140963

 

The takeaway (for me) is that "a BSE containing GR without plant myrosinase showed substantially lower conversion to SF (about 10%)." If you want to go the Broccoli Seed Extract route, you need to verify the myrosinase enzyme activity of your supplement.

 

Your product description should read something like: "Sulforaphane Glucosinolate (Brassica oleracea L. Italica) (A proprietary blend of Sulforaphane Glucosinolate, SGS [aka Glucoraphanin], and Myrosinase Enzyme from De-Oiled Broccoli Seed Powder Plus Calcium Ascorbate)"


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#11 Kirito

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 02:41 AM

Another NAD precurser, Nicotinamide Mononucleotide, is also present in broccoli. I wonder how that compound holds up with the various methods of preparation of broccoli sprouts.



#12 mrkosh1

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 03:17 AM

Richard,

 

Do you know of any supplements that fit that criteria?



#13 Nat1971a

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 03:49 AM

Hi all

I have been taking broccoli sprouts powder on and off for the last year. Usually 3 to 5 times a week. Usually between half a tea spoon and full tea spoon mixed with Fiji water. And in the last 4 to 5 weeks have started taking hpn niagen. I can tell you 2 capsules was making me bounce off walls. I thought 1 capsule was ok but have come to the conclusion 1 capsule per day is still too much. It has been making me super charged lol

#14 Richard McGee

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 03:58 AM

Richard,

 

Do you know of any supplements that fit that criteria?

 

The description is from BroccoMax product by Jarrow Formulas (I suspect there are others, if you do some research reading labels). If the product description is accurate, the precursor GR should convert to SF equally well as broccoli sprouts.

 

The bioabsorption of home prepared broccoli formulas may also be variable, as well:

 

...regardless of delivery method, providing active myrosinase as part of the preparation enhanced the bioavailability of sulforaphane and reduced the variability of conversion (glucoraphanin to sulforaphane) that could otherwise be ascribed solely to myrosinase activity of the gut microbiota...

 


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#15 mrkosh1

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 04:01 AM

Nat 197,

 

Could you tell us the brand and ingredients of your broccoli sprout extract?

 

I wonder if pre-mixing the broccoli sprout extract, pre-heating to let's say 60C for four minutes (to destroy the compounds that would make the form of sulforaphane we don't want are destroyed), and then adding ground mustard seed extract would produce a greater quantity of sulforaphane?

 

At this time, here is the procedure I plan to utilize:

 

1) In a ziplock bag with as much atomosphere removed as possible (via a straw), I will place a large quantity of broccoli sprouts.

2) I will pour water at 60C into a container containing the bag of sprouts and remove after four or five minutes.

3) I will remove the sprouts from the bag, place them in the blender, add a small quantity of ground mustard seed, and blend until it is a gooey mix.

4) I will extract the gooey mix and allow it to sit in the refrigerator for an hour or longer to maximize reaction time.

5) Consume on a daily basis.

 

I think it might be useful to time the consumption of the sprouts (the sulforaphane hits the blood stream in thirty minutes and increases from there) with the expected spike of nicotinamide riboside. So if I took the nicotinamide riboside at breakfast, I'd consume the sprouts at lunch.

 

To make the gooey mix of sprouts taste a little better, I'm considering turning them into a salsa with tomatoes.

 

 



#16 Nat1971a

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 04:40 AM

Http://Aus.supersprout.co

Australian organic broccoli sprout powder
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#17 Harkijn

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 07:14 AM

Nat 197,

 

Could you tell us the brand and ingredients of your broccoli sprout extract?

 

I wonder if pre-mixing the broccoli sprout extract, pre-heating to let's say 60C for four minutes (to destroy the compounds that would make the form of sulforaphane we don't want are destroyed), and then adding ground mustard seed extract would produce a greater quantity of sulforaphane?

 

At this time, here is the procedure I plan to utilize:

 

1) In a ziplock bag with as much atomosphere removed as possible (via a straw), I will place a large quantity of broccoli sprouts.

2) I will pour water at 60C into a container containing the bag of sprouts and remove after four or five minutes.

3) I will remove the sprouts from the bag, place them in the blender, add a small quantity of ground mustard seed, and blend until it is a gooey mix.

4) I will extract the gooey mix and allow it to sit in the refrigerator for an hour or longer to maximize reaction time.

5) Consume on a daily basis.

 

I think it might be useful to time the consumption of the sprouts (the sulforaphane hits the blood stream in thirty minutes and increases from there) with the expected spike of nicotinamide riboside. So if I took the nicotinamide riboside at breakfast, I'd consume the sprouts at lunch.

 

To make the gooey mix of sprouts taste a little better, I'm considering turning them into a salsa with tomatoes.

MrKosh, Just a word of caution about DIY sprouting: small oversights wrt hygiene may cause really bad pathogens to grow. If your sprouts taste gooey something is wrong: they should taste crisp and tangy.  I know myself and buy my sprouts in supermarkets, keeping an eye on the BestBefore date.

I have been a daily user of Dr. Gregers Hack  and Hold approach since he published his video, so I cut the sprouts, leave them on the counter and later mix them with for instance cucumber and tomatoes. I never heat sprouts.

Also: I have been a satisfied NR user since april 2015. I am in  good shape but no age reversal....


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#18 mrkosh1

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 10:06 AM

harkijn,

 

Two interesting things I've found.

 

A pharmaceutical company is trying to get a drug based on a thermally "stable" form of sulforaphane approved. It is called sulforadex.

 

http://articles.merc...phane-pill.aspx

 

This is even more evidence to me that we are onto something big.

 

Another thing I've found is that in certain types of radishes, instead of sulforaphane being created another substance called sulforaphene (with an E) is created.

 

http://www.actahort..../841/841_21.htm

 

RADISH SPROUTS VERSUS BROCCOLI SPROUTS: A COMPARISON OF ANTI-CANCER POTENTIAL BASED ON GLUCOSINOLATE BREAKDOWN PRODUCTS Authors: T.J. O'Hare, D.J. Williams, B. Zhang, L.S. Wong, S. Jarrett, S. Pun, W. Jorgensen, M. Imsic Keywords: glucoraphenin, glucoraphanin, epithiospecifier protein, sulforaphene, sulforaphane, isothiocyanate DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2009.841.21 Abstract:
Radish sprouts and broccoli sprouts have been implicated in having a potential chemoprotective effect against certain types of cancer. Each contains a glucosinolate that can be broken down to an isothiocyanate capable of inducing chemoprotective factors known as phase 2 enzymes. In the case of broccoli, the glucosinolate, glucoraphanin, is converted to an isothiocyanate, sulforaphane, while in radish a similar glucosinolate, glucoraphenin, is broken down to form the isothiocyanate, sulforaphene. When sprouts are consumed fresh (uncooked), however, the principal degradation product of broccoli is not the isothiocyanate sulforaphane, but a nitrile, a compound with little anti-cancer potential. By contrast, radish sprouts produce largely the anti-cancer isothiocyanate, sulforaphene. The reason for this difference is likely to be due to the presence in broccoli (and absence in radish) of the enzyme cofactor, epithiospecifier protein (ESP). In vitro induction of the phase 2 enzyme, quinone reductase (QR), was significantly greater for radish sprouts than broccoli sprouts when extracts were self-hydrolysed. By contrast, boiled radish sprout extracts (deactivating ESP) to which myrosinase was subsequently added, induced similar QR activity to broccoli sprouts. The implication is that radish sprouts have potentially greater chemoprotective action against carcinogens than broccoli sprouts when hydrolysed under conditions similar to that during human consumption.

 

Formation and Stabilization of Raphasatin and Sulforaphene from Radish Roots by Endogenous Enzymolysis

Jae-Won Kim,1,2Mi-Bo Kim,2 and Sang-Bin Lim1,2

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC4500514/

 

Abstract

The biologically active compounds raphasatin and sulforaphene are formed during the hydrolysis of radishes by an endogenous myrosinase. Raphasatin is very unstable, and it is generated and simultaneously degraded to less active compounds during hydrolysis in aqueous media. This study determined the hydrolysis conditions to maximize the formation of raphasatin and sulforaphene by an endogenous myrosinase and minimize their degradation during the hydrolysis of radish roots. The reaction parameters, such as the reaction medium, reaction time, type of mixing, and reaction temperature were optimized. A stability test for raphasatin and sulforaphene was also performed during storage of the hydrolyzed products at 25°C for 10 days. The formation and breakdown of raphasatin and sulforaphene in radish roots by endogenous enzymolysis was strongly influenced by the reaction medium, reaction time, and type of mixing. The production and stabilization of raphasatin in radishes was efficient in water and dichloromethane with shaking for 15 min at 25°C. For sulforaphene, the favorable condition was water as the reaction medium without shaking for 10 min at 25°C. The maximum yields of raphasatin and sulforaphene were achieved in a concurrent hydrolysis reaction without shaking in water for 10 min and then with shaking in dichloromethane for 15 min at 25°C. Under these conditions, the yields of raphasatin and sulforaphene were maximized at 12.89 and 1.93 μmol/g of dry radish, respectively. The stabilities of raphasatin and sulforaphene in the hydrolyzed products were 56.4% and 86.5% after 10 days of storage in water and dichloromethane at 25°C.

 

--

 

There are also indicators that by adding radish extract to broccoli extract, more sulforaphane would be created in the broccoli extract.

 

Basically, I'm trying to figure out how to max this out and produce the most potent sulforaphane/sulforaphene cocktail possible.

 

Perhaps the best option would be a broccoli sprout, radish sprout, and mustard sprout blend?


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#19 sthira

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 10:21 AM

Growing broccoli seeds is interesting and fun, grow them in jars or in pans, I've done both, jars are easier, seeds are relatively inexpensive (compared to what you're paying for fancy broccopills or canned powders or whatever they're pitching faddishly now) but of course, duh, do be hygienic while growing anything you're gonna chomp and insert into your body as food. You don't want ecoli, yuck it's no fun, but ecoli in sprouts is easily preventable if you use some basic hygienic growing principles and some common sense. But if you get trapped inside overwrought Internet forums, then things get scary.

The thing about eating any healthy food is that it needs to be sustainable or you won't do it. Making disgusting slurries out of delicious little broccoli seeds seems disgusting and unworkable to me, I've tried, but hey, big world lotsa people. If you enjoy the taste of such a thing however cleverly disguised, well then yay.

Ground mustard seed is delicious, it's a sharp spice, it may have certain reactive qualities when added to cooked cruciferous vegetables. Eating broccoli sprouts regularly shows benefits and little downside risk, it's part of a healthy eating plan and lifestyle, but growing and eating broccoli sprouts isn't going to save our lives from the ravages of aging. Rewatch Dr. Patrick's video: she knows what she's talking about.
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#20 mrkosh1

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 11:10 AM

I found an interesting document on the pharmaceutical Sulforadex.

 

http://www.hardmanan...ulforaphane.pdf

 

What is MOST interesting in the document is the following statement:

 

SFX-01

 

The first product developed by Evgen using its Sulforadex technology is SFX-01, which is a white solid that has proved to be stable at ambient temperature for a period of at least two years. This allows accurate and repeatable dosing of sulforaphane (300mg of SFX-01 is equivalent to 46mg of sulforaphane).

 

Notice the last bit of information.

 

(300mg of SFX-01 is equivalent to 46mg of sulforaphane).

 

Although I recognize there is some benefit of having a pill that can be given to people who would not be willing to consume properly heated broccoli sprouts blended together to maximize the production of sulforaphane, in another way this is an outrage.

 

Here we have a pharmaceutical product that is over SIX TIMES less potent than the same substance that can be found in the actual plant. What nature made as powerful and potent, man has watered down and weakened!

 

Interestingly, according to Rhonda Patrick, one large mason jar full of sprouts can contain 60-80mg of sulforaphane. That is the interesting thing about sulforaphane: it seems to be one of the only plant nutriceuticals that is active enough in the body and is absorbed well enough that it could be eaten in sufficent quantities to be have a significant effect.

 

Basically, I think this is another indicator that natural is the way to go with sulforaphane!

 

 



#21 sthira

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 11:58 AM

Basically, I think this is another indicator that natural is the way to go with sulforaphane!

Right on! Now you're talking!

Of course, red radish sprouts are healthy, too. Eat them. And eat kale sprouts, sprouted lentils, mung, alfalfa, sunflower sprouts, too, and Bengal gram sprouts, chickpeas, on and on.

The point is: eat plants. Eat a wide variety of plants, and sometimes focus on some species over other species, and when the season changes and your unconscious taste buds decide to shift, go with it and then eat some other species of plants.

Look: just because some post docs decided to study one sprout and neglect all the other worldly sprouts doesn't mean all the others don't also have wildly complex beneficial qualities, too. Kale sprouts -- tell me they're also not healthy and chemopreventative?

Fields of edible plant and fungi species have not yet been analyzed. Certain university agrilabs have been funded by some unpublicized agricultural project that happens to have some big ideas. Mostly the big idea involves how much money can we make.

Nutrition science can convince us of just about anything: ha, look at the world dietary situation, there are billions of overweight and undernourished people waddling around sadly seeking health products, and they're all essentially victims of wowzie university and industry food science and marketing brilliance. Axiom: don't base personal dietary habits on mouse studies. And be sure that some of the highest paid visionary artists are working in the food, beverage, pharma, supplement marketing industries, and they'll convince us of just about anything, even if we don't want to be convinced.

Meanwhile, cruciferous vegetables appear to have solid health benefits; so in whatever ways you can get the things into your body -- except in that fried poisonous addictive American way -- do it. Eat sprouts; but don't lose your mind. As beautiful and sweet and healthy as they are, they're just sprouts.

Want an even more proven and healthy dietary habit than even sprouts? Eat nothing. Fasting and then refeeding with a healthier plant-based diet will set into motion undreamed of beneficial chemical responses that no lab will create or duplicate soon. Best of all: fasting is free! In fact, it's cheaper than free.

Good luck with sprouting -- it's loads of fun and somehow oddly subversive in this messed up culture.

Edited by sthira, 05 January 2017 - 12:26 PM.

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#22 Richard McGee

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 09:58 PM

A few words of caution are in order.

  • Children, the elderly, pregnant women, and persons with weakened immune systems should avoid eating raw sprouts of any kind (including alfalfa, clover, radish, and mung bean sprouts).
  • Cook sprouts thoroughly to reduce the risk of illness. Cooking kills the harmful bacteria.
  • Request that raw sprouts not be added to your food. If you purchase a sandwich or salad at a restaurant or delicatessen, check to make sure that raw sprouts have not been added.

foodsafety.gov

 

  • Despite their nutritional advantages, sprouts carry a serious risk of foodborne illness. Seeds and beans need warm and humid conditions to sprout and grow. These conditions are also ideal for the growth of bacteria, including Salmonella, Listeria, and E. coli.2
  • Raw or lightly cooked sprouts have been implicated in over 30 reported foodborne outbreaks within the United States since 1996.  The majority of these outbreaks were caused by Salmonella and E.coli.2
  • Sprout-related outbreaks in the U.S. have led to over 1800 reported illnesses since 1996.3 Considering the general rule of thumb for Salmonella cases – for every 20-100 illnesses per lab-confirmed case, that could mean that there have been as many as 100,000 or more sprout related illnesses in the U.S. in the past 18 years.4

 

FoodSourceWiki

 

Of course life is full of risks. How you weigh these risks has to be an individual determination, but such a determination should be made in full cognizance of the real risks. Eating raw sprouts is, by some metrics, as risky as eating undercooked or raw meat. I recommend you consider your individual health status (including immune status), before embarking on a raw sprout regimen.


Edited by Richard McGee, 05 January 2017 - 10:13 PM.

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#23 mrkosh1

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Posted 06 January 2017 - 12:38 AM

Would rinsing the final sprouts in a weak solution of bleach kill any harmful bacteria without effecting the sprout quality, taste, or nutritional content?

 



#24 Oakman

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Posted 06 January 2017 - 12:49 AM

I don't believe this product has been mentioned, truebrocTM.  It's a sulphoraphane broccoli extract with 13% Glucoraphanin.

 

http://brassica.com/...ts-of-truebroc/

 

I've been coming to the conclusion that plant based supplements are superior for a while and have been assembling a plant based protocol. Couple weeks ago I'd ordered some ultrabroctm detox with truebroctm, and finally received it.  I'm searching combination products to cut pill count and still keep quality and performance. 

 

Anyway, UltraBroc is a combination Whey protein based curcumin called UltraCur and the truebroc extract. The whey curcumin compound is astounding by itself, incredibly high bioavailability  > something like 610ng/ml blood levels within 20-40 minutes, and remaining in the blood for 8-12hrs... but adding ultabroc (25mg sulphoraphane/3.25mg Glucoraphanin) on top is perfect  - and so two items off my protocol list :)

 

The curcumin UltraCur alone > http://www.ultrabotanica.com/

The curcumin and truebroc or UltraBrock Detox > http://www.ultrabota.../ultrabroc.html

 

supplement-facts_ultrabroc-full.jpg?crc=


Edited by Oakman, 06 January 2017 - 12:51 AM.

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#25 sthira

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Posted 06 January 2017 - 12:57 AM

Would rinsing the final sprouts in a weak solution of bleach kill any harmful bacteria without effecting the sprout quality, taste, or nutritional content?

Yikes bleach!

2

Thank you for the rational warning; while I certainly honor it and acknowledge the risk, I've never had a problem with ecoli and raw sprouts. Fingers and toes crossed. Of course that I've not been sick from sprouts in the past means nothing about the future, and (knowing the way the world works) now that I've bragged that I've never been sick, I'll probably keel over dead tomorrow. Imagine that: killed by sprouts I was eating to stay alive longer: the irony.

Boiling raw sprouts would deactivate the goodies, though. Dr. RP says in the video I linked above that heating water to 60-70 degrees, then pouring it onto raw sprouts, letting them soak for ten minutes or so may help. ?No idea if this is true or not. I do grow my own sprouts, though, and I'm careful very careful indeed.

Edited by sthira, 06 January 2017 - 01:04 AM.

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#26 tintinet

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Posted 06 January 2017 - 01:19 AM

Gamma rays!;)
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#27 izan82

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Posted 06 January 2017 - 07:41 PM

New Rhonda Patrick video on Sulforaphane --->  

 

 

https://www.reddit.c...followup_to_my/


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#28 Fox in Socks

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Posted 06 January 2017 - 10:40 PM

I bought Dr. Mercola Fermented Broccoli Sprouts from Amazon. From the descriptions of all available sprout supplements, this seemed to be the best choice. I know I won't be growing sprouts, although I'm sure they are great. I've always loved broccoli, and it is such a beneficial, nutritious vegetable. It's my favorite.

Broccoli seed oil is excellent for hair.

Nature's Answer Brocco Glutathione also sounds like a good one.

 



#29 tunt01

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Posted 06 January 2017 - 10:43 PM

The video explicitly recommends Avmacol sulforaphane as a supplement
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#30 scooterboy

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Posted 07 January 2017 - 03:51 PM

BroccoMax has 30mg of Glucoraphanin per capsule . Would one a day be enough with NR ? 







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