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Alzheimer's protocol — dissolve & detoxify

aβ plaques plaques oleuropein hepps tau

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#451 Turnbuckle

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Posted 08 April 2019 - 02:31 PM

For all those who do not buy into the amyloid/tau axis as a cause of AD and do not believe the protocol developed here can help them, please post your own solutions on a new thread. There are countless crackpot and otherwise speculative theories out there and I have no wish to debate them and no desire to have them clog up this thread. For those who want to try a protocol that works, it can be found in this thread in post 399. The latest update can always be found on my profile page (click on my avatar to get there). If you've tried this protocol, please feel free to post your results.


Edited by Turnbuckle, 08 April 2019 - 02:33 PM.

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#452 ceridwen

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Posted 08 April 2019 - 03:22 PM

I think we need something to clear up cerebral infections
However there seem to be rather a lot of them and it is possible one could be attacked by more than one infection at once
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#453 ccll

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Posted 15 April 2019 - 07:09 PM

Updated Alzheimer's protocol — experimental

 

 

Fascinating thread. Spent many hours reading.

 

So I'm about to turn 50 and have noticed increased decline in mental recall and tenacity ( following a complicated train of thought and following through multi-step debug processes). How do I know if this protocol will help? In other words, is all mental decline due to alpha and beta plaque? If I try taurine, oleuropine, curcumin (maybe glutathione)  first and notice improvements, then would adding EPPS be moot? I don't have any family history of Alzhimers. Grandmother had dementia, but she lived through historically traumatic times. I do seem to be affected by anxiety due to stress.

 

The whole protocol would add up to close to $300. So perhaps trying those first 3 or 4 items ($150) is a good approach? 

 

Some background: I used to take ALC-ALA for energy. That worked wonders for a while, then stopped working.  Later got off Mirena IUD and felt much better.  I tried C60 three years ago. It worked wonders, and then stopped working. Then I tried adrenal support like Rhodiola and Ashwaganda to have more energy. Ash is more even and gentle and did give me energy, but it boosted sex hormones a lot. In the last year my blood pressure has gone high. I tried Nicotinamide Riboside for blood pressure. Didn't notice much difference. The only thing that seems to work is prescription drugs. So I'm now on diuretic and lisinopril.



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#454 Turnbuckle

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Posted 15 April 2019 - 07:38 PM


So I'm about to turn 50 and have noticed increased decline in mental recall and tenacity...

 

You are young for AD, so I would first get a genetic test. If you don't have the APOE4 gene or the early-onset genes listed below, then it is probably something else.

 

I think we need something to clear up cerebral infections

 

 

 

People have suggested gingivitis and herpes as causes of AD, but retrospective cohort studies show them to have relatively little impact. They may supply some stimulating factor to the production of Aβ or p-tau, but they aren’t in the same ballpark as the APOE4 gene. Looking at odds ratio (OR) to the general population —
 
Group — Odds Ratio 
Chronic periodontitis — 1.05
Herpesviridae (HSV1) in the brain — 1.38
One APOE4 gene — 2-3 
Two APOE4 genes — 12 
 
Among the general population, about 8 percent of people have APOE2, 78 percent have APOE3, and 14 percent have APOE4. However, among people with late-onset, nonfamilial Alzheimer’s, which accounts for 95 percent of all cases, the profile is very different: Only 4 percent have APOE2, and the percentage with APOE3 drops to 60 percent. APOE4 shows a dramatic increase: Thirty-seven percent of late-onset Alzheimer’s patients carry this version of the gene.
 
“APOE4 is by far the most significant risk gene for late-onset, sporadic Alzheimer’s disease,”  Dr Tsai says. “However, despite that, there really has not been a whole lot of research done on it. We still don’t have a very good idea of why APOE4 increases the disease risk.”

 

 

 

Early-onset Alzheimer's--

A very small percentage of people who develop Alzheimer's disease have the early-onset type. Signs and symptoms of this type usually appear between ages 30 and 60 years. This type of Alzheimer's disease is very strongly linked to your genes.
 
Scientists have identified three genes in which mutations cause early-onset Alzheimer's disease. If you inherit one of these mutated genes from either parent, you will probably have Alzheimer's symptoms before age 65. The genes involved are:
 
Amyloid precursor protein (APP)
Presenilin 1 (PSEN1)
Presenilin 2 (PSEN2)

 

 

References:

Alzheimer's and periodontitis: https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/30874308

Edited by Turnbuckle, 15 April 2019 - 07:57 PM.

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#455 William Sterog

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Posted 15 April 2019 - 11:08 PM

The cause of my mental decline is probably not Alzheimer's, given that I am "just" 26, but I have many issues with memory lately, and with extreme mental fatigue, hypersomnia and suddenly passing out. The doctors have been unable to offer any help whatsoever.

Given that I had a respectable IQ to begin with, my now mediocre state is, supposedly, not enough to get worry, although my decline is obvious and measurable (from dual back 9 to dual back 6, for example, as one of the many measures that I have taken).

It is a shame, but this protocol, which I know that it is not suited for me, but I tried out anyways because of my sheer desperation, and I have also read that plaques are common in a lot of mental issues, have not worked. I have not taken HEPPS nor Dihydromyricetin, they are hard to get in my country, or so it seems, and they might me the key, I don't know.

I feel like if my life is being stolen, I constantly feel that I am not myself anymore, everything I produce is terrible, and I am even unable to properly express myself.

If you want to experiment on we, I am mostly open to be a guinea pig.

Fisetin is one of the very few things that helps, I don't know why. You may want to also try it. Thanks for this protocol, sorry about the sobbing. Don't give up, people.

#456 Mind_Paralysis

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 03:03 PM

The cause of my mental decline is probably not Alzheimer's, given that I am "just" 26, but I have many issues with memory lately, and with extreme mental fatigue, hypersomnia and suddenly passing out. The doctors have been unable to offer any help whatsoever.

Given that I had a respectable IQ to begin with, my now mediocre state is, supposedly, not enough to get worry, although my decline is obvious and measurable (from dual back 9 to dual back 6, for example, as one of the many measures that I have taken).

It is a shame, but this protocol, which I know that it is not suited for me, but I tried out anyways because of my sheer desperation, and I have also read that plaques are common in a lot of mental issues, have not worked. I have not taken HEPPS nor Dihydromyricetin, they are hard to get in my country, or so it seems, and they might me the key, I don't know.

I feel like if my life is being stolen, I constantly feel that I am not myself anymore, everything I produce is terrible, and I am even unable to properly express myself.

If you want to experiment on we, I am mostly open to be a guinea pig.

Fisetin is one of the very few things that helps, I don't know why. You may want to also try it. Thanks for this protocol, sorry about the sobbing. Don't give up, people.

 

Curious... some of what you mention sounds an awful lot like OCCUPATIONAL BURNOUT - the fact that you are intelligent ant driven is even a risk-factor in todays society - driving yourself too hard, which is easy, causes Burnout. Is this something which you have considered?

 

Another possibility, which I don't want to mention too much, is some kind of auto-immune reaction... a lite-version of what some call CFS/ME - Chronic Fatigue Symptom. But your symptoms sound mostly cognitive, not physical to the same extent? Or am I misinterpreting things?

 

If you have burnout, then a protocol which enhances neurogenesis (omega-3, blueberry extract, curcumin, resveratrol ), coupled with NSI-189 may be sufficient to get you back on your feet.

 

I take it that you have done multiple tests on yourself? Blood taken, urine taken, brain scanned, et c? (I'd suggest doing that first)



#457 Turnbuckle

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 03:14 PM

Fisetin is one of the very few things that helps, I don't know why. 

 

If fisetin helps, perhaps you have a problem with autophagy, perhaps your mitochondria are screwed up. Seems unlikely at your age, but possible. You might try PQQ, and if that helps, then give my mito protocol a shot -- https://www.longecit...ndpost&p=870740



#458 platypus

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 04:50 PM

you might try PQQ, and if that helps, then give my mito protocol a shot -- 

Unless this has already been coined, I'd like to propose that your protocol is called "The Turnbuckle Protocol" from now on. 


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#459 aribadabar

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 05:54 PM

Unless this has already been coined, I'd like to propose that your protocol is called "The Turnbuckle Protocol" from now on. 

Disagree on the naming convention - Turnbuckle offered so many treatment vectors in various directions that making one of them The protocol is confusing and doing disservice to the other proposed regimens by him.

Look at the links after clicking on his avatar to see what I mean.


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#460 platypus

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Posted 18 April 2019 - 08:02 AM

How about "Turnbuckle mito-protocol" & "Turnbuckle Alzheimer protocol"? Possibly others...


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#461 William Sterog

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Posted 18 April 2019 - 12:43 PM

Tests are normal. Yes, even brain scanners. They said that my brain presented a lot of non-pathological abnormalities. I am not sure of what does this mean, but I asked for a second opinion and they said that I had indeed nothing to be worry about.

I have tried PQQ with no obvious benefits. 10mg is a better dosage than 20mg in my experience, the latter sometimes gives me a headache.

Creatine and ALCAR help for a little while, but soon I crash and I feel much worse. I do suspect that it may have something to do with my mitochondria, but this protocol hasn't help me neither.

Excuse my English.

Edited by William Sterog, 18 April 2019 - 12:45 PM.


#462 Turnbuckle

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Posted 18 April 2019 - 12:47 PM

Tests are normal. Yes, even brain scanners. They said that my brain presented a lot of non-pathological abnormalities. I am not sure of what does this mean, but I asked for a second opinion and they said that I had indeed nothing to be worry about.

I have tried PQQ with no obvious benefits. 10mg is a better dosage than 20mg in my experience, the latter sometimes gives me a headache.

Creatine and ALCAR help for a little while, but soon I crash and I feel much worse. I do suspect that it may have something to do with my mitochondria, but this protocol hasn't help me neither.

Excuse my English.

 

 

If PQQ didn't help, and given your age, the problem likely lies elsewhere. My protocols are unlikely to help.



#463 EfeitoPlacebo

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Posted 07 June 2019 - 10:20 PM

https://www.washingt...2ec0_story.html

The company’s blockbuster rheumatoid arthritis therapy Enbrel, a powerful anti-inflammatory drug, appeared to reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease by 64 percent.

Edited by EfeitoPlacebo, 07 June 2019 - 10:21 PM.


#464 Turnbuckle

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Posted 08 June 2019 - 12:22 PM

https://www.washingt...2ec0_story.html

The company’s blockbuster rheumatoid arthritis therapy Enbrel, a powerful anti-inflammatory drug, appeared to reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease by 64 percent.

 

 

Inflammation as a result of the presence of plaques is indeed part of the problem, and is known that RA has an association with AD. However, addressing inflammation does not get at the plaques themselves.--

 

The presence of joint disorders, especially RA, at midlife seems to be associated with a worse cognitive status later in life. Given the chronic inflammatory component of RA, this study suggests that inflammatory mechanisms may have an important role in increasing the risk of cognitive impairment and dementia/AD.

https://www.longecit...132&qpid=875039

 

 

And a later cohort study--

 

The study enrolled 34,660 middle-aged ARD patients (77% female, mean age = 59.8 years) and 138,640 controls. The risk of developing dementia was 1.18 times higher for middle-aged patients with ARDs compared with patients without ARDs after adjustment for age, sex, and comorbidities. Among the patients with ARDs, the subgroups with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and Sjögren syndrome (SS) were associated with a significantly higher dementia risk (adjusted hazard ratio   1.14, 95% confidence index [CI] 1.06-1.32; adjusted HR 1.07, 95% CI 0.86-1.34; adjusted HR 1.46, 95% CI 1.32-1.63, respectively). Furthermore, primary SS and secondary SS patients had the highest risks of dementia among all the ADR subgroups (adjusted HR 1.35, 95% CI 1.18-1.54; adjusted HR 1.67, 95% CI 1.43-1.95 respectively).

https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/29304089

 

 

However, only Sjogren's syndrome (an autoimmune disorder that causes dry eyes and mouth) had a hazard ratio in the range suggested by the Enbrel study. 


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#465 theobromananda

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Posted 11 June 2019 - 08:22 AM

@Turnbuckle

 

A tangentially related question: Would some of the compounds in this protocol also work for reversing arterial plaque? I definitely have vitamin D toxicity, and the amount of calcium in my urine makes me really nervous. I am still in my 20s, and I am interested in preserving my health, not doing damage to it. I am taking high doses of vitamin K and looking into aged garlic.

 

My mother has completed three months of this protocol, and is looking sharper. We'll see how her state progresses.

 

 

Thank you.



#466 Turnbuckle

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Posted 11 June 2019 - 10:36 AM

@Turnbuckle

 

A tangentially related question: Would some of the compounds in this protocol also work for reversing arterial plaque? I definitely have vitamin D toxicity, and the amount of calcium in my urine makes me really nervous. I am still in my 20s, and I am interested in preserving my health, not doing damage to it. I am taking high doses of vitamin K and looking into aged garlic.

 

My mother has completed three months of this protocol, and is looking sharper. We'll see how her state progresses.

 

 

Thank you.

 

 

Possibly. As for taurine--

 

This is the first comprehensive study examining the effect of high dietary taurine supplementation on the left main coronary artery. The major findings of this investigation are as follows: (1) taurine supplementation inhibited the development of hyperhomocysteinemia and hypermethioninemia and temporal effects of diet on plasma tHcy and methionine levels; (2) taurine supplementation inhibited endothelial cell apoptosis possibly by reduction in ER stress; (3) taurine supplementation reduced left main coronary artery atherosclerosis; and (4) taurine supplementation did not significantly affect the endothelial level of proteins associated with the NOS, RAS, or oxidative stress systems.

 

 

 
I suspect HEPPS might be even better, but it hasn't been studied. Taurine and HEPPS are sulfonic acids, as is the drug Trodusquemine, which is said to be very effective at reversing atherosclerosis.Trodusquemine is undergoing trials and is available today if you are a researcher. But at $600 for one milligram, it's absurdly expensive.
 
As for the dihydromyricetin, hydroxytyrosol, and oleuropein--

These findings suggest that dihydromyricetin could reduce atherosclerosis via its pleiotropic effects, including improvement of endothelial dysfunction, inhibition of macrophage foam cell formation, amelioration of lipid profiles, anti-inflammatory action and anti-oxidative effect.
 
Hydroxytyrosol from olive oil exerts antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-platelet aggregation and anti-atherogenic activities in in vitro and animal models. However, its possible therapeutic use in humans requires additional clinical trials.
 
Oleuropein has a beneficial effect on several aspects of cardiovascular disease via its vasodilatory, anti-platelet aggregation, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. 

 

 


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#467 v_squared123

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Posted 12 June 2019 - 10:31 PM

What about 40 hz audio and visual stimulation?

 

Some of us know of that MIT article that was released a while back about using 40 hz light stimulation by flickering an led strip at 40 hz. This showed to reduce Abeta levels in the genetically modified lab subjects.

 

"the researchers used light flickering at 40 hertz, delivered for one hour a day. They found that this treatment reduced levels of beta amyloid plaques and another Alzheimer’s-related pathogenic marker, phosphorylated tau protein. The treatment also stimulated the activity of debris-clearing immune cells known as microglia."

 

They used a 40 hz audio tone:

 

" In their new study, the researchers set out to explore whether they could reach other brain regions, such as those needed for learning and memory, using sound stimuli. They found that exposure to one hour of 40-hertz tones per day, for seven days, dramatically reduced the amount of beta amyloid in the auditory cortex (which processes sound) as well as the hippocampus, a key memory site that is located near the auditory cortex."

 

They also found that auditory treatment induced changes in not only microglia, but also the blood vessels, possibly facilitating the clearance of amyloid."

 

Then they combined both 40 hz light + 40 hz audio tone:

 

"The researchers then decided to try combining the visual and auditory stimulation, and to their surprise, they found that this dual treatment had an even greater effect than either one alone. Amyloid plaques were reduced throughout a much greater portion of the brain, including the prefrontal cortex, where higher cognitive functions take place. The microglia response was also much stronger."

 

Source: http://news.mit.edu/...alzheimers-0314

 

Then there is the anecdotal side of things of people trying this. If you take a look at this link I will post this guy who has a website with that covers this area. He created a tone generator which can produce a range of audio tones including 40 hz. He notes that an individual contacted him explaining he used his tone generator to create a 40 hz tone and his family member who has AD apparently showed improvement. If you look at the comments on his website other individuals have claimed to try this method a playing a 40 hz tone and noticed what appears to be improvements in their family members with AD as well.

 

Cool thing is he lists ways to do this and some cautionary stuff like this is still experimental, becareful, etc probably to cover his a$$ but its fascinating. 

 

https://blog.szynals...one-alzheimers/

 

My point for this is despite the anecdotal claims this could be added to the protocol simply because it targets AD pathology. Also, this approach is very easy to do. Its super accessible to anyone with a laptop/computer, computer speakers and internet. Importantly, its very inexpensive to do and seems to be harmless. Seems to be. 

 

Youtube has plenty of 40 hz audio tones but its probably best to use his audio tone generator because it seems more...accurate? You can pick various "tones" as well. Sine, wave, square, sawtooth. Its best to use Sine in my opinion because its a low rumble as opposed to the other options which are more harsh to listen to. 

 

As for the 40 hz light stimulation....there is this company that has produced a light bulb that fiickers at 40 hz just like in the experiment. They also have an MP3 players which is preloaded with a 40 hz tone that you can listen too ( but this woudl be through headphones and not larger external speakers ) 

 

https://gammalightth...z-light-devices

 

Youtube also has videos of 40 hz light flicker for free. In fact, they one that is has 40 hz light flicker with a 40 hz audio tone. So I suppose one could use that and simply stare at the screen or keep it in ones peripherial vision...or hook it up a large tv and keep it in ones peripherial vision

 

Also, if someone has some money they could opt for a high end subwoofer which would ( most definetly ) produced a ( very i.e louder ) audible 40 hz tone. It would be loud low rumble. Might even shake the room. 

 

Its just so easy and accessible and cheap to do. You just play the tone through some external speakers in the background or nearby ( which ever is preferred ) and can include the 40 hz light flicker in your line of sight or peripherally for an hour ( same design as done by the MIT folks ) 

 

Opinions?

 

 


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#468 v_squared123

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Posted 12 June 2019 - 10:38 PM

This is his Tone Generator. Select 40 hz and press play. You wont be able to hear it through normal laptop speakers. You will need external computer speakers or a subwoofer. It will produce a low audible rumble. Its automatically set to use a "sine" tone. But there is square, triangle and sawtooth which produce a much more harsh and uncomfortable tone. 

 

https://www.szynalsk...tone-generator/

 

You could use youtube but there seems to be variations and possibly inaccurate "tones" so the tone generator would be best to use. 

 

 



#469 Mind

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Posted 06 July 2019 - 10:13 AM

LANDO helps microglia digest amyloid beta

 

https://www.stjude.o...in-buildup.html


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#470 BieraK

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Posted 17 July 2019 - 05:51 AM

Tests are normal. Yes, even brain scanners. They said that my brain presented a lot of non-pathological abnormalities. I am not sure of what does this mean, but I asked for a second opinion and they said that I had indeed nothing to be worry about.

I have tried PQQ with no obvious benefits. 10mg is a better dosage than 20mg in my experience, the latter sometimes gives me a headache.

Creatine and ALCAR help for a little while, but soon I crash and I feel much worse. I do suspect that it may have something to do with my mitochondria, but this protocol hasn't help me neither.

Excuse my English.

I think this has to do with mitochondria.

ALCAR helps neurons to produce ATP and enhances neuronal cell fate decision from stem cells

Creatine helps a lot to people with TBI, it increases ATP production. Creatine also has some mechanisms similar to Ketamine, it relieves depression by activating PI3K/AKT/mTOR 

 

So this perhaps has relation with 1) Some neuronal atrophy similar to depression 2) Mitochondrial dysfunction leading reduced ATP

 

Try with a fasting cycle, the fasting mimicking diet from Valter Longo works very well for reducing brain inflammation, it eliminates depression also, and apparently enhances mitophagy.

 

As I know you were taking several herbs like Polygala, Catuaba, Gingko I wonder if some of these combinations were the cause behind the dysruption in your brain leading to all of these  symptoms.  


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#471 William Sterog

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 03:57 PM

I think this has to do with mitochondria.
ALCAR helps neurons to produce ATP and enhances neuronal cell fate decision from stem cells
Creatine helps a lot to people with TBI, it increases ATP production. Creatine also has some mechanisms similar to Ketamine, it relieves depression by activating PI3K/AKT/mTOR

So this perhaps has relation with 1) Some neuronal atrophy similar to depression 2) Mitochondrial dysfunction leading reduced ATP

Try with a fasting cycle, the fasting mimicking diet from Valter Longo works very well for reducing brain inflammation, it eliminates depression also, and apparently enhances mitophagy.

As I know you were taking several herbs like Polygala, Catuaba, Gingko I wonder if some of these combinations were the cause behind the dysruption in your brain leading to all of these symptoms.


I have fasted extensively, I even wonder if so much fasting has hurt me, given that I am excessively thin. I gave up herb extracts without luck. I am becoming prematurely senile.
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#472 Turnbuckle

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Posted 15 August 2019 - 08:39 AM

AD protocol update:

 

-----------

Plaque cocktail, part A (dose):

·    Taurine (10 g)

·    HEPPS (1 g)

·    Nicotinamide (500 mg)

·    Carnosine (3 g)

 

Plaque cocktail, part B (dose):

·    Sulforaphane glucosinolate (50 mg)*

·    Oleuropein (100 mg)

·    Hydroxytyrosol (25 mg)

·    Dihydromyricetin (350 mg)

·    Vitamin C (1 g)

·    Glutathione, liposomal or phytosomal (500 mg)

 

Memory cocktail, part C (dose):

·    Sulforaphane glucosinolate (50 mg)*

·    Taurine (10 g)

·    Methionine (2 g)

·    TUDCA (250-500 mg, do not use with alcohol)

 

Cocktail A is dosed in fruit juice and Cocktail B in tablets and capsules. They are taken together, with Cocktail B repeated after four hours. Cocktail C can be used separately, if needed.

-----------

 

The main change is the addition of sulforaphane and a memory cocktail. Unlike stearic acid, sulforaphane crosses the BBB where it acts as an antioxidant and creates mito fusion, biasing neural stem cells to proliferation. Taurine is an antioxidant and stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis, while TUDCA biases neural stem cells to become neurons rather than support cells. Carnitine, which I took out, can cause digestive upset in some.

 

*Source for sulforaphane, available at Amazon: Thorne Research - Crucera-SGS - Broccoli Seed Extract for Antioxidant Support - Sulforaphane Glucosinolate (SGS) 

 

The previous update was in post #399. A link to the latest can always be found on my profile page.

 


Edited by Turnbuckle, 15 August 2019 - 08:57 AM.

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#473 Barfly

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Posted 15 August 2019 - 01:35 PM

Memory coctail and reasoning behind it looks really interesting;

 

Would taking this stack make sense even if you don't suffer from AD symptoms - I am constantly searching for ways to improve focus, energy levels and life quality in general so wondering if this stack might be helpful? (I already used thoroughly your mitochondria protocol with solid results)

 

One more question please- could NAC replace or be a good add on to glutathione (sorry if that has been asked before)?



#474 Turnbuckle

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Posted 15 August 2019 - 08:23 PM

Memory coctail and reasoning behind it looks really interesting;

 

Would taking this stack make sense even if you don't suffer from AD symptoms - I am constantly searching for ways to improve focus, energy levels and life quality in general so wondering if this stack might be helpful? (I already used thoroughly your mitochondria protocol with solid results)

 

One more question please- could NAC replace or be a good add on to glutathione (sorry if that has been asked before)?

 

Given the relentless increase of the AD rate with age, there are surely millions with subclinical build-up, so you may be losing IQ points without being aware of it. And certainly you should check your genetics for the e4 allotype. Many probably don't because they don't want to know, thinking there's nothing they can do about it.

 

As for subbing NAC for liposomal glutathione, that should be fine. NAC can be tough on the stomach, thus I didn't include it.


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#475 EfeitoPlacebo

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Posted 18 August 2019 - 01:12 PM

How about L-Serine? it seems promising as a potentil treatment for AD

 

https://fortune.com/...e-breakthrough/

 

 

https://www.nextaven...imers-research/

 

 

https://clinicaltria...how/NCT03062449   Phase IIa L-serine Trial for eAD (LSPI-2) - 

Estimated Study Completion Date  : August 31, 2019

 

 


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#476 Turnbuckle

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Posted 18 August 2019 - 03:10 PM

 

How about L-Serine? it seems promising as a potentil treatment for AD

 

https://fortune.com/...e-breakthrough/

 

 

https://www.nextaven...imers-research/

 

 

https://clinicaltria...how/NCT03062449   Phase IIa L-serine Trial for eAD (LSPI-2) - 

Estimated Study Completion Date  : August 31, 2019

 

 

 

Thanks. I will see how that does with the protocol.



#477 resveratrol_guy

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 01:45 PM

That's interesting about the sulforaphane. I was actually just about to look it up on the web because I've noticed that my memory gets a boost when I drink it (in the form of LAC Veggie Shield powder, but surely supplements on Amazon are cheaper). I knew that it had been shown to suppress various tumors, so I thought it might be a prudent preventative measure, but I'd never bothered to investigate any neurological effects. It might also be synergistic with the cordyceps and moringa powders that I mix with olive oil. (I would definitely recommend mixing the oil, in turn, with a fibrous meal. Anything over a level teaspoon of morninga powder is not advisable for the uninitiated.)

With regards to your protocol, HEPPS did seem to help. I never noticed much from taurine or olive leaf extract, though.

Keep up the relentless research, Turnbuckle. It's making a difference.

 

* To be fair, it might be something else in the Veggie Shield, although its distinguishing feature is brocolli sprout extract, which is rich in the stuff. Granted, I've had good results with Suja Uber Greens as well, which is similar but for the sprout extract.


Edited by resveratrol_guy, 19 August 2019 - 01:52 PM.

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#478 High_Probability

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 03:56 PM

AD protocol update:

 

-----------

Plaque cocktail, part A (dose):

·    Taurine (10 g)

·    HEPPS (1 g)

·    Nicotinamide (500 mg)

·    Carnosine (3 g)

 

Plaque cocktail, part B (dose):

·    Sulforaphane glucosinolate (50 mg)*

·    Oleuropein (100 mg)

·    Hydroxytyrosol (25 mg)

·    Dihydromyricetin (350 mg)

·    Vitamin C (1 g)

·    Glutathione, liposomal or phytosomal (500 mg)

 

Memory cocktail, part C (dose):

·    Sulforaphane glucosinolate (50 mg)*

·    Taurine (10 g)

·    Methionine (2 g)

·    TUDCA (250-500 mg, do not use with alcohol)

 

Cocktail A is dosed in fruit juice and Cocktail B in tablets and capsules. They are taken together, with Cocktail B repeated after four hours. Cocktail C can be used separately, if needed.

-----------

 

The main change is the addition of sulforaphane and a memory cocktail. Unlike stearic acid, sulforaphane crosses the BBB where it acts as an antioxidant and creates mito fusion, biasing neural stem cells to proliferation. Taurine is an antioxidant and stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis, while TUDCA biases neural stem cells to become neurons rather than support cells. Carnitine, which I took out, can cause digestive upset in some.

 

*Source for sulforaphane, available at Amazon: Thorne Research - Crucera-SGS - Broccoli Seed Extract for Antioxidant Support - Sulforaphane Glucosinolate (SGS) 

 

The previous update was in post #399. A link to the latest can always be found on my profile page.

 

Which brand of TUDCA?  Which company is the most reliable/trustworthy?


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#479 resveratrol_guy

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Posted 28 August 2019 - 12:30 PM

Just a word of caution against destroying the plaques as they may actually be beneficial in protecting the brain against invading viruses. More and more research shows evidence that the true villain in Alzheimer's is herpes viruses and other similar viruses.

 

https://www.theatlan...heimers/564887/

 

https://www.medicaln...cles/322463.php

 

So, my thinking is that long time dosing with anti viral medication may be a better route for protecting against alzheimer's, perhaps combined with the procedure described in this thread.

 

Sounds like a good way to delay the reaccumulation of plaque after applying Turnbuckle's protocol for a while. More on this, and the research of Moir et al:

 

https://www.statnews...evailing-theory
https://www.ncbi.nlm...cles/PMC5935641
 

I realize I'm responding to an old post, but I think this is worth some further scrutiny, particularly since acyclovir showed the most effectiveness in the Taiwanese study. In any event antiherpetics in general achieved about a 40% reduction in AD hazard ratio after 10 years of followup, given less than 30 days of continuous historical use. With longer than a month of use, which might mean years on average, the hazard ratio dips below 10%, which puts AD risk barely above the background rate of uninfected individuals, all else being equal. (In this case, I'm referring to excess hazard ratio, meaning that a 100% reduction would put someone on equal footing with individuals who have never been infected. See Figure 1 & Table 6, second link.) Granted, it's not the best study due to its reliance on health insurance records, but at least antiherpetics are extremely well characterized and widely available. Moreover, they seem to suppress multiple different viruses, including HSV1, HSV2, and CMV.

 

It's impressive that short term use could achieve such lasting reduction in the hazard ratio, as HSV1 is robustly resident in the CNS and is in general incurable. I know of no other AD prophylactic with such preventative power. The implication would seem to be that these drugs exert an evolutionary pressure on the virus which biases them toward dormancy, so that they cause less immune activation, particularly in the brain. Less viral activity would then, based on the first link above, tend to result in a lower rate of plaque deposition.

 

BTW there are blood tests for herpes antibodies. Granted, it's an extremely common infection (and for the most part subclinical), so it would hardly be surprising for the tests to be positive.


Edited by resveratrol_guy, 28 August 2019 - 12:33 PM.


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#480 resveratrol_guy

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Posted 01 September 2019 - 12:56 PM

I suppose that the taurine supplementation is recommended because taurine water preserved cognition in mice. As I recall, cats can't synthesize it (not sure about mice), but humans can: "The major route for the biosynthesis of taurine, shown in Figure 1B is from methionine and cysteine via cysteinesulfinic acid decarboxylase (CSD), and typically requires oxidation of hypotaurine to taurine as the final step"

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm...cles/PMC3501277

 

This might explain why it hasn't done anything discernable for me, over tens of 8g doses. Of course I also realize that supplementing it might still have value if the synthesis is insufficient, or if the benefits accrue subtly over months. I've tried dissolving it in water, which is next to impossible, and also olive oil. For that matter, I tried it on low carb as well as low protein. Nothing to report.

 

 







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