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Alzheimer's protocol — dissolve & detoxify

aβ plaques plaques oleuropein hepps tau

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#631 Neurocryo

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Posted 30 May 2021 - 10:19 PM

 

AD protocol update:

 

I’m going to put the previous protocol with grape juice and methylene blue on hold and revert to a simplified version of an older one. A couple of commenters worried about the HEPPS dose and its stability in grape juice, and likely they are right. The results seemed fine for a couple of months, after which symptoms began returning in one individual, and after one dose of the simplified protocol shown below, the symptoms resolved within an hour. As I noted in the above post, I have another idea for using the MB/HEPPS protocol to simultaneously treat P-tau and Aβ as well as a third AD etiology, but I’m still testing it.

 

 

Plaque cocktail (dose):

 

●   Taurine (5 g)

●   HEPPS (500 mg)

●   Nicotinamide (500 mg)

●   Sulforaphane glucosinolate (50 mg)

●   Oleuropein (100 mg)

●   Hydroxytyrosol (25 mg)

●   Vitamin C (1 g)

●   Glutathione, liposomal or phytosomal (1 g)

 

Dosed as needed — once a day to once a week.

 

 

 

Haven’t tried HEPPS yet cause I’m still pretty young and good genotype.  I have taken some head hits so focus my protocols on tau.

 

I think you may need to incorporate some additional chemicals to address the brain physiology this regiment will elicit.  When you break up a plaque, it won’t go straight from fibril to monomer.  The plaque will transiently be an oligomer and at that instant, in theory, your brain will experience a huge molar excess of toxic species compared to when they are stabilized in fibrils and dynamically forming smaller concentrations of oligomers.  
 

I would recommend a pretreatment with AHCC, lions mane, autophagy inducers before disrupting the plaques,  My theory is to prime my brain to respond to the transient extreme increase in concentration of toxic species of tau, promote neurotrophic signaling, autophagy, and immune system to chomp up the prions first.

 

From what I’ve read about tau it seems to be phosphorylated allll over the place.  One thing I am starting to take into consideration is dosing with one tau disrupted at a time.  That is, some anti tau intercalators may be more effective in an aggregate of a specific species of phosphorylations.  Theory is that if you hit it with methylene blue or anti tau compound x, you affect all the plaques in your brain differently.  I look at it like plaques developing antibiotic resistance so you can hit them with various disrupters in succession alternating, before a bad phosphorylation profile takes hold.


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#632 lancebr

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Posted 07 June 2021 - 07:22 PM

So any opinions about the newly FDA approved Alzheimer's drug called Aduhelm/Aducanumab?

 

 

https://www.statnews...s-drug-aduhelm/

 

https://www.cnbc.com...st-4-years.html

 

 

Supposedly it is suppose to "clear away clumps of a misshapen protein called beta-amyloid".


Edited by lancebr, 07 June 2021 - 07:24 PM.


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#633 Advocatus Diaboli

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Posted 07 June 2021 - 07:40 PM

.

 

A brand of HEPPS that can be used in protocol.

 

Another more expensive choice (per gram)


Edited by Advocatus Diaboli, 07 June 2021 - 07:58 PM.

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#634 EliotH

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Posted 08 June 2021 - 02:12 PM

So any opinions about the newly FDA approved Alzheimer's drug called Aduhelm/Aducanumab?

 

 

https://www.statnews...s-drug-aduhelm/

 

https://www.cnbc.com...st-4-years.html

 

 

Supposedly it is suppose to "clear away clumps of a misshapen protein called beta-amyloid".

 

From a UPI article (no direct link I copied from another website). Turnbuckle's protocol is much less expensive and probably works better.

 

The drug could carry a cost somewhere between $10,000 and $50,000 per patient per year, according to Wall Street analysts, though Biogen has yet to announce a price.

 


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#635 aribadabar

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Posted 08 June 2021 - 05:07 PM

 

Another more expensive choice (per gram)

 

That's because you haven't used the same size package.



#636 Advocatus Diaboli

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Posted 08 June 2021 - 09:47 PM

Re: post #632:
 
lancebr, from your first link:
 
"In two clinical trials, about 40% of clinical trial patients who got the approved dose of Aduhelm developed painful brain swelling. Symptoms included headache, dizziness, visual disturbances, nausea, and vomiting; about 17% to 18% of patients had microhemorrhages, or small bleeds in their brain. Patients will be monitored for brain swelling before their seventh and 12th infusions. If imaging shows severe swelling, treatment can continue “with caution only after a clinical evaluation and a follow-up MRI demonstrates radiographic stabilization,” the label says."
 
That would be enough for me to say "no thanks" to Aduhelm.
 
 
Re: post #635
 
My "per gram" mention in post #633 was specifically about the "...more expensive choice (per gram)" for the two products in the given links, and was not about the price per gram for two equal quantities ("same size package") of a product.
 
In one purchase you are paying  $118.72/100 = $1.1872/gram and in the other purchase: $39.59/25 =  $1.5836/gram. So, as presented, my claim: "...more expensive choice (per gram)" is correct and your: "That's because you haven't used the same size package." has no relevance to the correctness of my claim, unless, perhaps, if you are mistakenly assuming that I'm attempting claim something that I'm not. Had I been doing a "value" comparison, then equal quantities would have been considered in coming to a "per gram" cost. But, I wasn't doing that comparison. One might question my intent, and the reasoning by which I phrased things as I did, but that's another matter. (Incidentally, I'm not saying you said my claim was incorrect.).
 
I suspect that for some, a particular purchase may come down to choices among perceived urgency of need, cash availability, and value, among others. Sometimes "value" is sacrificed by dint of availability of funds.
 
 
 
 

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#637 Mind

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Posted 17 August 2021 - 03:25 PM

Donanemab works very well, a-beta levels remain low long after treatment.


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#638 Mr Matsubayashi

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Posted 23 September 2021 - 12:35 PM

Damn, Donanemab sounds amazing. 
 
I stumble upon this and thought of you turnbuckle, 
 
Diosmin reduces cerebral Aβ levels, tau hyperphosphorylation, neuroinflammation, and cognitive impairment in the 3xTg-AD Mice
Diosmetin, one major bioactive metabolite of diosmin, increased inhibitory GSK-3β phosphorylation, while selectively reducing γ-secretase activity, Aβ generation, tau hyperphosphorylaion and pro-inflammatory activation of microglia in vitro, without altering Notch processing.
 
 
Antihyperalgesic Effect of Hesperidin Improves with Diosmin in Experimental Neuropathic Pain
Hesperidin is a lipophilic compound that has shown pharmacological central actions as analgesic [26] and anxiolytic-sedative [12] suggesting that it may effectively cross the blood-brain barrier to display central effects. In fact, in the present study, the presence of hesperidin was corroborated in brain homogenates of rats treated by the systemic route of administration, where a portion of the administered hesperidin was metabolized into the flavonoid diosmin
 
 
I love Hesperidin. I take 2g in the morning with my coffee, can feel the warmth in my extremities and a good bump in mental clarity. It is also a selective Pde4 inhibitor, VEGF agonist, vasodilator. Initially it gave me a headache at 500mg but now it's just awesome. 
 
Edit: Oh, and I think it has worked wonders for my skin. 

Edited by Mr Matsubayashi, 23 September 2021 - 12:49 PM.

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#639 Turnbuckle

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Posted 23 September 2021 - 01:03 PM

 

Damn, Donanemab sounds amazing. 
 
I stumble upon this and thought of you turnbuckle, 
 
Diosmin reduces cerebral Aβ levels, tau hyperphosphorylation, neuroinflammation, and cognitive impairment in the 3xTg-AD Mice
Diosmetin, one major bioactive metabolite of diosmin, increased inhibitory GSK-3β phosphorylation, while selectively reducing γ-secretase activity, Aβ generation, tau hyperphosphorylaion and pro-inflammatory activation of microglia in vitro, without altering Notch processing.

 

 

It might be interesting as an add-on, as the reported effects aren't that strong. They require daily treatment, and the positive effects in mice are sex-linked.

 

Diosmin markedly decreased cerebral Aβ levels... as well as soluble Aβ1–40, 42 levels by 37% (DLO) and 51% (DHI)... Most notably, oral diosmin treatment reduced Aβ oligomer levels more in female than in male 3xTg-AD mice (26% reduction in females versus no significant difference in males)

 



#640 Old grandpa

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Posted 02 January 2022 - 04:21 AM

Hello all. I haven't read this thread all the way through, so don't know if this has been discussed. Have you seen the data for Viagra and Alzheimer's? Looks very promising. https://www.nih.gov/...heimers-disease
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#641 poonja

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Posted 03 January 2022 - 04:09 PM

Would that apply to other pde5 inhibitors such as cialis.


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#642 Old grandpa

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Posted 04 January 2022 - 10:24 PM

I have no idea since it seems to have a couple of different modes of action. This study https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC3828881/ indicates it is involved in revascularization in the heart, in addition to its improving blood flow. It would seem to do little good to supplement if the supplements can't reach the intended target due to poor circulation or vascularization. I would assume the entire class of pde5 inhibitors increase blood flow but the angiogenesis aspect is unknown to me.





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