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Anyone using CBD if so what are your experiences?

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#1 BioHacker=Life

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Posted 21 October 2018 - 03:41 AM


I just tried out some recently and was surprised how effective it is for anxiety, pain, and sleep. I'm using 15 mg a day and so far so good.


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#2 John250

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Posted 21 October 2018 - 04:30 PM

I’ve used 25mg CBD isolate for around a year now. Didn’t really notice any positives but I use it for its neuroprotective effects against amphetamine use. The problem with CBD is most studies show extremely high doses like 600 mg or more.
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#3 BioHacker=Life

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Posted 20 November 2018 - 01:25 AM

I’ve used 25mg CBD isolate for around a year now. Didn’t really notice any positives but I use it for its neuroprotective effects against amphetamine use. The problem with CBD is most studies show extremely high doses like 600 mg or more.

 

I use a full spectrum cbd maybe that's why I see a difference in about an hour. The effects are definitely stronger at 50-100 mg but for day to day 15 mg seems to work. 



#4 brosci

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Posted 22 November 2018 - 09:37 PM

If one is optimizing for general sharpness / productivity / attentitiveness, does CBD get in the way (similar to cannabis) or is it more of a curcumin type of supplement that is less than noticable?  Or might it even have some nootropic potential?


Edited by brosci, 22 November 2018 - 09:38 PM.


#5 John250

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Posted 24 November 2018 - 05:45 PM

I use a full spectrum cbd maybe that's why I see a difference in about an hour. The effects are definitely stronger at 50-100 mg but for day to day 15 mg seems to work.


I’ve added 10mg full spectrum with my 25mg CBD isolate. I think I will gradually increases my doses of CBD up to around 100mg total. Maybe a combo of the 2 with some nano CBD water(apparently 5mg nano is equal to around 25-30mg standard isolate).

#6 airplanepeanuts

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Posted 25 November 2018 - 11:41 PM

I’ve used 25mg CBD isolate for around a year now. Didn’t really notice any positives but I use it for its neuroprotective effects against amphetamine use. The problem with CBD is most studies show extremely high doses like 600 mg or more.

 

 

I took a gram once last year (Endoca), maybe because as a dosage guide I refered to one the studies. It got me extremely high, including some paranoia and visual hallucinations. Not supposed to happen without THC, but that was my experience.



#7 BioHacker=Life

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Posted 30 November 2018 - 03:58 AM

I took a gram once last year (Endoca), maybe because as a dosage guide I refered to one the studies. It got me extremely high, including some paranoia and visual hallucinations. Not supposed to happen without THC, but that was my experience.

 

I don't see how it's not capable of doing that. Neurochemically speaking. Could be placebo related but if you did take a gram it needs fat to be absorbed.


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#8 mono

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Posted 03 December 2018 - 04:17 AM

I took a gram once last year (Endoca), maybe because as a dosage guide I refered to one the studies. It got me extremely high, including some paranoia and visual hallucinations. Not supposed to happen without THC, but that was my experience.

 

Yes I had the same experience when using high dosage of an elixinol syringe.

 

I have since changed brands and do not have the same experience with the higher doses anymore.


Edited by mono, 03 December 2018 - 04:17 AM.


#9 airplanepeanuts

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Posted 03 December 2018 - 04:58 PM

Do you think that some brands are not as THC free as advertised? 


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#10 sthira

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Posted 03 December 2018 - 05:34 PM

Do you think that some brands are not as THC free as advertised?


This is partly what I think, although perhaps the components involved are more complicated than just isolating out the THC.

I was taking this one brand of popular CBD oil sublingually, and having very nice experiences. Almost out of body, mildly trippy experiences. As if -- suddenly -- everything was okay about the world and myself. I felt better, people looked friendlier, life felt nicer, air cleaner, colors seemed more vivid, I felt lighter, easier, niggling pain and emotional discomfort vanished, stressed chilled, depression eased, things that formerly upset me stopped upsetting me, I felt like I'd gained a nice wider perspective about my life and my reactions to this life. CBD seemed miraculous to me -- I wrote up my experiences here, and widely advocated CBD to friends and family.

Then it stopped working.

I take the same stuff, at the same dose, from the same company: I feel nothing of what I felt before. My opinion is popularity caught on with CBD, big money got involved, people are getting very wealthy off of CBD oil sales, and so the politics changed. Now the brand I formerly liked dropped their prices, they added fancy labels and packaging, and now zilch-ville.

So I wrote them an email asking if they'd changed their formula when they changed to new labels on their little bottles, and they said no, our formula is the same as it ever was.

I don't believe them, though: either my body adapted to their chemicals, or they changed their chemicals (possibly lowering THC but other components are involved, too).
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#11 BioHacker=Life

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Posted 08 December 2018 - 05:17 AM

Do you think that some brands are not as THC free as advertised? 

 

Some may but most of the companies have 3rd party labs on their sites.



#12 Nate-2004

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Posted 08 December 2018 - 06:01 AM

The endocannabinoid system is still being studied and is a new area of exploration. What we do know about how CBD binds to CB1 receptors is that it tends to block some of the THC from binding. CBD is neuroprotective and can reduce the psychotic effects of THC and even protect a person from psychosis.  It is also said to protect a person from the negative effects on memory and the effects of paranoia that people experience with THC.  I personally experience this every time I use a full range blend of cannabinoids I buy from Colorado in the form of a vape cartridge, by "Become". 

 

I think if people are going to use THC that they should get the full range of cannabinoids including CBN. 

 

Both the endocannabinoid receptors and NMDA receptors are linked to cognition and synapse firing. THC antagonizes NMDA receptors and this can lead to cognitive deficits which can even trigger full blown psychosis in some people. NMDA antagonism has several effects in the chain of reactions to this such as increased D2 agonism in the mesolimbic system. This can result in hallucinations and delusions among other problems. Schizophrenia is highly related to this. Many suspect that neuroinflammation is at the root of the NMDA antagonism that leads to this condition and second generation antipsychotics do not deal with this root cause, they merely act on D2 receptors to slow their hyperactivity. They have several negative side effects that result such as parkinsonism, inertia and further cognitive deficits due to the anticholinergic properties of the antipsychotics (unfortunately pro-histamines like modafinil and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors like galantamine do not reverse this problem and even block the antipsychotics intended effects).  Evidence for inflammation at the root of schizophrenia is made stronger by the fact that minocycline can send schizophrenics into remission. Minocycline is an antibiotic with neuro-anti-inflammatory properties.  I have even more suspicion that regular exercise, sauna use and other anti-inflammatory lifestyle adjustments can send schizophrenics into remission. My roommate is schizophrenic, but until he actually tries these things we'll never know.

 

CBD can not only help protect CB1 receptors but NMDA receptors as well, possibly resulting in anxiolytic effects when it binds to these. CBD does not fully bind like THC does either. It just acts on them in a way we don't quite yet understand and blocks THC from binding.

 

By the way, don't go taking NMDA agonists trying to get smarter, like sodium benzoate (DAO inhibitor), because NMDA overstimulation is also a problem that leads to other terrible conditions. Plus, this doesn't work for schizophrenics because it doesn't deal with the inflammation at the root of the problem. D-Serine doesn't either.

 

CBD has been lost in the recent strains of the marijuana plant, unfortunately, and this needs to change. It is very high in the hemp plant and this is where most of it is extracted and then reblended in oils for vape carts.

 

The reason why sthira might have experienced positive anxiolytic effects at first and then nothing, might have more to do with some sort of desensitization or tolerance changes due to a growth of new CB1 receptors or something else. Sort of like how adenosine receptors become more abundant when blocked by caffeine.

 

CBD is unlikely to reverse any condition in the brain induced by THC or other NMDA antagonizing drugs like alcohol or ketamine, it can only serve to protect. Funny thing though, recent news said that it can block the addictive properties of certain drugs like opioids or methamphetamines. 

 

There is some small amount of evidence that it is a neuro-anti-inflammatory.  I have all this documented somewhere.

 

All we know right now is that it protects neurons in some way.


Edited by Nate-2004, 08 December 2018 - 06:21 AM.

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#13 John250

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Posted 08 December 2018 - 09:01 PM

The endocannabinoid system is still being studied and is a new area of exploration. What we do know about how CBD binds to CB1 receptors is that it tends to block some of the THC from binding. CBD is neuroprotective and can reduce the psychotic effects of THC and even protect a person from psychosis. It is also said to protect a person from the negative effects on memory and the effects of paranoia that people experience with THC. I personally experience this every time I use a full range blend of cannabinoids I buy from Colorado in the form of a vape cartridge, by "Become".

I think if people are going to use THC that they should get the full range of cannabinoids including CBN.

Both the endocannabinoid receptors and NMDA receptors are linked to cognition and synapse firing. THC antagonizes NMDA receptors and this can lead to cognitive deficits which can even trigger full blown psychosis in some people. NMDA antagonism has several effects in the chain of reactions to this such as increased D2 agonism in the mesolimbic system. This can result in hallucinations and delusions among other problems. Schizophrenia is highly related to this. Many suspect that neuroinflammation is at the root of the NMDA antagonism that leads to this condition and second generation antipsychotics do not deal with this root cause, they merely act on D2 receptors to slow their hyperactivity. They have several negative side effects that result such as parkinsonism, inertia and further cognitive deficits due to the anticholinergic properties of the antipsychotics (unfortunately pro-histamines like modafinil and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors like galantamine do not reverse this problem and even block the antipsychotics intended effects). Evidence for inflammation at the root of schizophrenia is made stronger by the fact that minocycline can send schizophrenics into remission. Minocycline is an antibiotic with neuro-anti-inflammatory properties. I have even more suspicion that regular exercise, sauna use and other anti-inflammatory lifestyle adjustments can send schizophrenics into remission. My roommate is schizophrenic, but until he actually tries these things we'll never know.

CBD can not only help protect CB1 receptors but NMDA receptors as well, possibly resulting in anxiolytic effects when it binds to these. CBD does not fully bind like THC does either. It just acts on them in a way we don't quite yet understand and blocks THC from binding.

By the way, don't go taking NMDA agonists trying to get smarter, like sodium benzoate (DAO inhibitor), because NMDA overstimulation is also a problem that leads to other terrible conditions. Plus, this doesn't work for schizophrenics because it doesn't deal with the inflammation at the root of the problem. D-Serine doesn't either.

CBD has been lost in the recent strains of the marijuana plant, unfortunately, and this needs to change. It is very high in the hemp plant and this is where most of it is extracted and then reblended in oils for vape carts.

The reason why sthira might have experienced positive anxiolytic effects at first and then nothing, might have more to do with some sort of desensitization or tolerance changes due to a growth of new CB1 receptors or something else. Sort of like how adenosine receptors become more abundant when blocked by caffeine.

CBD is unlikely to reverse any condition in the brain induced by THC or other NMDA antagonizing drugs like alcohol or ketamine, it can only serve to protect. Funny thing though, recent news said that it can block the addictive properties of certain drugs like opioids or methamphetamines.

There is some small amount of evidence that it is a neuro-anti-inflammatory. I have all this documented somewhere.

All we know right now is that it protects neurons in some way.


Cannabinoids and THC have show to be highly protective against amphetamine neurotoxicity through NMDA antagonizing and I think possibly calcium channel as well.
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#14 mono

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Posted 08 December 2018 - 11:12 PM

@airplanepeanuts - Yes I could only assume there is some minute quantity of THC left in the product that is active in higher doses, unless there is another unknown cannabinoid that is psychoactive, I can't think of any other reason why that would happen.

 

@Nate-2004 - There is a thread in the brain health section on KYNA inhibitors, perhaps you could make a post there or tell me what drugs could possibly deal with the root cause of neuroinflammation in schizophrenia?



#15 cat-nips

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Posted 09 December 2018 - 03:12 PM

Cannabinoids and THC have show to be highly protective against amphetamine neurotoxicity through NMDA antagonizing and I think possibly calcium channel as well.

 

Makes sense.  I found cannabis to be the safest and best way to negate side effects of amphetamine as well as keep tolerance and dosages stable and improve mood.  Amps negated negative side effects of cannabis so it was a happy synergy.    



#16 awarren

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Posted 12 December 2018 - 01:20 AM

@airplanepeanuts and @mono  Even High Doses of Oral Cannabidiol Do Not Cause THC-Like Effects in Humans: Comment on Merrick et al. Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research 2016

 

 


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#17 Nate-2004

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Posted 12 December 2018 - 04:56 AM

@airplanepeanuts - Yes I could only assume there is some minute quantity of THC left in the product that is active in higher doses, unless there is another unknown cannabinoid that is psychoactive, I can't think of any other reason why that would happen.

 

@Nate-2004 - There is a thread in the brain health section on KYNA inhibitors, perhaps you could make a post there or tell me what drugs could possibly deal with the root cause of neuroinflammation in schizophrenia?

 

If you can get the patient to exercise very consistently, 4 times per week and use the sauna 20 mins 4 times per week, and eat properly, you wouldn't need any drugs. Though I am sure turmeric, DHA/EPA in phospholipids (krill oil), and other known anti-inflammatory compounds might help in conjunction, not alone.

 

I cannot get my friend to do these things. Minocycline is one of two known drugs that can reduce neuroinflammation and it is an antibiotic, not exactly practical for regular use. Perhaps it could get them feeling better enough temporarily to engage in those protocols/lifestyle interventions.

 

Another problem is that the gen 2 antipsychotics actually make it even harder for the patient to follow those lifestyle interventions.  It entraps them in a worsening feedback loop.

 

I actually read more about it with relation to D-Serine today. Apparently inflammation actually induces more D-serine production. This is odd. I don't know quite how to wrap my head around that. I was expecting to read the exact opposite.


Edited by Nate-2004, 12 December 2018 - 05:02 AM.


#18 mono

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Posted 12 December 2018 - 05:35 AM

I have schizoaffective and have spent the majority of my life exercising. Over the last 5 or so years I added high intensity cardio to that regimen and am now at a point where I have lost all motivation to exercise in the manner that I previously did. Like you said the antipsychotics can really dampen ones passion and determination. Unfortunately with all this exercise I have done throughout my life my mood has still been highly unstable, it did not actually make a significant difference and actually worsened my level of chronic pain at times.

So even though I have an understanding of the benefits exercise has on the body and mind, I just do not feel the effect on my mood would justify the effort required at this point in my life. However I love exercise, I love sport and activity and yearn to pick up the types of activity that I was engaged in, I just don't feel that it would make a significant enough impact on my mental health considering I have spent so much time in the past already doing that.

 

I haven't tried a sauna before and would probably not be able to stand the heat anyway given how sensitive I am to it. I am admittedly am a little skeptical that simply adding in sauna time with exercise would combat the disease. Really I am looking for a drug related approach to bring back some of that motivation and positivity that will allow me to pick up exercising once again and of course be able to live a functional life. Right now I am just trialling uridine and for the first time in a number of months I could envision myself on a treadmill, so there is some hope and positivity in that. I've also added in curcumin, I have a two month supply and so I will see how that goes too.

 

Thanks for sharing what you have on the treatment of schizophrenia, I appreciate learning more about it and that others are learning and sharing things that can help too. If you can think of any other treatments or more so drugs that may be worth trying let me know, as I am always interested in getting a better handle of my well-being.


Edited by mono, 12 December 2018 - 05:36 AM.


#19 brosci

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Posted 12 December 2018 - 07:11 AM

What's the word on CBDA / CBG / CBN / CBC / CBL, etc?  I've seen CBG isolate, but the anecdotes are far and few.



#20 Nate-2004

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Posted 12 December 2018 - 09:44 PM

I have schizoaffective and have spent the majority of my life exercising. Over the last 5 or so years I added high intensity cardio to that regimen and am now at a point where I have lost all motivation to exercise in the manner that I previously did. Like you said the antipsychotics can really dampen ones passion and determination. Unfortunately with all this exercise I have done throughout my life my mood has still been highly unstable, it did not actually make a significant difference and actually worsened my level of chronic pain at times.

So even though I have an understanding of the benefits exercise has on the body and mind, I just do not feel the effect on my mood would justify the effort required at this point in my life. However I love exercise, I love sport and activity and yearn to pick up the types of activity that I was engaged in, I just don't feel that it would make a significant enough impact on my mental health considering I have spent so much time in the past already doing that.

 

I haven't tried a sauna before and would probably not be able to stand the heat anyway given how sensitive I am to it. I am admittedly am a little skeptical that simply adding in sauna time with exercise would combat the disease. Really I am looking for a drug related approach to bring back some of that motivation and positivity that will allow me to pick up exercising once again and of course be able to live a functional life. Right now I am just trialling uridine and for the first time in a number of months I could envision myself on a treadmill, so there is some hope and positivity in that. I've also added in curcumin, I have a two month supply and so I will see how that goes too.

 

Thanks for sharing what you have on the treatment of schizophrenia, I appreciate learning more about it and that others are learning and sharing things that can help too. If you can think of any other treatments or more so drugs that may be worth trying let me know, as I am always interested in getting a better handle of my well-being.

 

There is too much exercise and there is too little. 4 days per week is the sweet spot on exercise. Either 20 mins HIIT or 40 mins endurance is ideal. It takes many months of consistency to see lasting and effective benefits, enough to not need medication. Do not over do it, do not under do it. It's about regular consistency, don't miss a beat unless there is some kind of rare emergency or holiday. Rhythm, just like sleep needs to be, in a rhythm. It's not just any one thing either it is a protocol of lifestyle interventions in conjunction with one another.

 

Sauna use in recent study is also referred to as "heat acclimation", meaning, you become less sensitive to it with increasing use. Start with 5 mins, work your way each time to 20 mins and stay at 20, 4 times per week, ideally just after exercise. Acclimation builds pretty quick so just add 5 mins each time you try.

 

Another therapy being looked into is cold thermogenesis, again, same idea, gradual exposure is better than jumping into the extreme. Turn the faucet on cold at the end of a shower for example, hold for 5 seconds and an additional 5 each day till you hit 20. End on cold. One thing notable about schizophrenia is that patients often have temperature dysregulation, both these extremes may help your body begin regulating temperature properly.

 

Don't take curcumin, buy bulk turmeric from Amazon and take a tsp of that with some healthy fats such as soy lecithin or krill oil or MCT or coconut milk and maybe some bioperine. The reason you want turmeric is because it's not just the curcumin that is active, there are other important contents that are active as well in reducing inflammation in both the gut and other areas. Plus it's a hell of a lot cheaper. A quick Google search will reveal plenty of resources.


Edited by Nate-2004, 12 December 2018 - 09:50 PM.


#21 cat-nips

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Posted 12 December 2018 - 10:00 PM

Can anyone PM me a good CBD source, and possibly ideas for the best variant for to use for non-psychoactive effects for neuropathic pain?  My partner who is experiencing chronic neuropathy in his feet and etc, expressed some interest in trying it as conventional treatments have not been effective.  I'm in NJ and there are still some restrictions in place, so it's not the easiest thing to obtain.  



#22 Nate-2004

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Posted 13 December 2018 - 12:37 AM

Can anyone PM me a good CBD source, and possibly ideas for the best variant for to use for non-psychoactive effects for neuropathic pain?  My partner who is experiencing chronic neuropathy in his feet and etc, expressed some interest in trying it as conventional treatments have not been effective.  I'm in NJ and there are still some restrictions in place, so it's not the easiest thing to obtain.  

 

You can get it anywhere in NJ. I'm in Philly, Chestnut and 21st has a shop that sells cartridges and vapes just CBD. I'm assuming with upcoming changes to legalization in NJ you'll see more full range terpine carts for vapes.



#23 cat-nips

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Posted 13 December 2018 - 02:32 AM

Duh, I should have thought of Philly. Thank you. I’m still a New Yorker at heart and still don’t know much about how things work here.

#24 cat-nips

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Posted 13 December 2018 - 02:37 AM

NJ is still medical only. It was supposed to have happened. There are changes every few days. It’s probably going to take another six months.

Am Imistaken about this? I wasn’t aware that CBD was sold in vape stores in NJ?

Edited by cat-nips, 13 December 2018 - 02:39 AM.


#25 John250

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Posted 13 December 2018 - 03:01 AM

Can anyone PM me a good CBD source, and possibly ideas for the best variant for to use for non-psychoactive effects for neuropathic pain? My partner who is experiencing chronic neuropathy in his feet and etc, expressed some interest in trying it as conventional treatments have not been effective. I'm in NJ and there are still some restrictions in place, so it's not the easiest thing to obtain.


My brother used to be a driver for a dispensary and a CBD company and said this is one of the better brands. It’s pretty pricey though.

http://soldistro.com...rofen-capsules/

#26 cat-nips

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Posted 13 December 2018 - 04:49 AM

Thank you!

#27 ironfistx

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Posted 20 December 2018 - 01:06 AM

I have tried CBD twice. The first was in liquid form, I took to help with tinnitis, and it worked. When I was using it I noticed an INCREASE in pain in a cartilage issue I have.

I tried it again later, pill form, for sleep. Same issue as noted above.

Resulting from this I stopped taking it.
 

My roommate is schizophrenic, but until he actually tries these things we'll never know.


That sounds scary.

Edited by ironfistx, 20 December 2018 - 01:06 AM.


#28 John250

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Posted 20 December 2018 - 01:30 AM

I have tried CBD twice. The first was in liquid form, I took to help with tinnitis, and it worked. When I was using it I noticed an INCREASE in pain in a cartilage issue I have.

I tried it again later, pill form, for sleep. Same issue as noted above.

Resulting from this I stopped taking it.


That sounds scary.

Maybe the CBD had high THC in it?
THC increases substance P (neurotransmitter) most known for its role in pain perception.

https://www.selfhack...stance-p-roles/

But this is contradictory:

“As for Substance P mechanisms, cannabinoids block capsaicin-induced hyperalgesia (Li et al 1999), and THC will do so at sub-psychoactive doses in experimental animals (Ko and Woods 1999).”

https://www.ncbi.nlm...60/#!po=15.6250

https://www.ncbi.nlm.../?report=reader

Edited by John250, 20 December 2018 - 01:31 AM.


#29 MG63

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Posted 20 December 2018 - 03:58 AM

I've used Pure Seven sublingual w/ 10 Melatonin.  Great for sleep



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#30 awarren

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Posted 22 December 2018 - 01:11 AM

I had the flu a couple days ago, and I remarked to someone that it seemed I was generally in a better mood during that time despite my illness.

 

I wondered if the cold medicine had anything to do with it, so I did some research and found out that DXM is being studied as a rapid-acting antidepressant.

 

It also turned out that these studies are being done with DXM coupled with a CYP2D6 inhibitor -- like CBD -- and I also have been taking CBD for months (about 10mg-25mg a day)!

 

I'm experimenting for a couple days and can update later.


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