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How to become a genius?

genius child prodigy wunder kind superior humans superior intellect

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#1 The Immortalist

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 04:44 AM


Please read the full article before responding.

How is this possible? http://www.popsci.co...o-played-fusion

Reading this article almost made me want to cry because it wasn't until I was 14 I had a basic grasp on what the periodic table actually was... this kid memorized everything on it completely and understood it at the age of 10. When I was 10 I didn't even know the periodic table existed lol.

What is the cause of this boy's increased intelligence? Obviously there is no answer but I just hope more research can go into the field of increasing intelligence so one day everyone can be as smart as this boy or even 100x smarter.

It just pisses me off that I work my ass off everyday at school trying to understand scientific and mathematical concepts and here's this kid who learned it all when he was a fucking toddler.

Yes this is mostly a rant thread.
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#2 The Immortalist

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 04:47 AM

But whatever this kids wasting his time on his useless research. He's going to die and be forgotten like everyone else. If he was truly a genius he would be working on aging research not this physics nuclear crap. Such a shame really.
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#3 rwac

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 05:09 AM

I don't know. Some people have their interests, and they may not be as productive in other fields.

#4 unregistered_user

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 05:41 AM

This is a bizarre thread.
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#5 Ampa-omega

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 08:35 AM

Find the kid and ask him. I'm sure there's a way to get in reach with him.
If anything email him and use google translate.

Edited by Ampa-omega, 24 February 2012 - 08:39 AM.


#6 1thoughtMaze1

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 09:00 AM

Government genetics engineering experiment , a super soldier
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#7 az3r132

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 04:09 PM

As it's so rare its obviously random mutation.
Now whether the mutation is acting on his intelligence, memory or motivational system is yet to be seen.
In regards to motivation, you would be surprised what a 100% motivated human can accomplish.
Much more than this kid has.

It is just so hard to become logically motivated. A mutation that removes logic from the equation in that regard would be nice.

#8 1thoughtMaze1

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 04:29 PM

But whatever this kids wasting his time on his useless research. He's going to die and be forgotten like everyone else. If he was truly a genius he would be working on aging research not this physics nuclear crap. Such a shame really.


Fusion will be the next energy source that will secure human survival for the indefinite future, it's not crap. And who wants to live forever

#9 Elus

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 05:01 PM

Please read the full article before responding.

How is this possible? http://www.popsci.co...o-played-fusion

Reading this article almost made me want to cry because it wasn't until I was 14 I had a basic grasp on what the periodic table actually was... this kid memorized everything on it completely and understood it at the age of 10. When I was 10 I didn't even know the periodic table existed lol.

What is the cause of this boy's increased intelligence? Obviously there is no answer but I just hope more research can go into the field of increasing intelligence so one day everyone can be as smart as this boy or even 100x smarter.

It just pisses me off that I work my ass off everyday at school trying to understand scientific and mathematical concepts and here's this kid who learned it all when he was a fucking toddler.

Yes this is mostly a rant thread.


I have to agree. It's really annoying to have to stuggle with concepts that someone else can immediately understand. It's just the luck of the genetic lottery. This isn't so much a matter of hard work, but a matter of curiousity and intelligence which seems to be hard wired into this kid's brain. Furthermore, his parents lacked a background in science, which makes it that much more surprising that the kid decided to go and pursue this on his own.

We will learn what causes this eventually. With increases in brain scanning resolution doubling every year, we will unravel the secrets of intelligence and those who want to upgrade their intelligence to godlike proportions will be able to. I know I will.

Edited by Elus, 24 February 2012 - 05:02 PM.

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#10 Michael Campbell

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 06:37 PM

But whatever this kids wasting his time on his useless research. He's going to die and be forgotten like everyone else. If he was truly a genius he would be working on aging research not this physics nuclear crap. Such a shame really.



That's quite a narrow worldview; your values are not everyone else's values. There are a whole host of valuable research subjects other than aging research. And who's to say he won't invent some cheap sustainable power source or something even more mind bogglingly useful?

Most of the great inventions and discoveries came from people who had a passion in that subject, not people who worried about efficiency or priorities.
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#11 hippocampus

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 06:56 PM

(1) Genius is one percent inspiration, ninety-nine percent perspiration. - Edison; google about 10000 hours rule.
(2) There are many people who have very high IQ but haven't achieved nothing special in their life.
Genius = hard work (motivation) + intelligence + creativity [+ some luck IMO and appropriate environment] (this has been studied thoroughly so you just need to pick any good book about psychology of genius)
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#12 Now

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 07:11 PM

Don't be too jealous. Many gifted kids have problems in other areas such as isolation, perfectionism, high expectations, underachievement, existential depression/anxiety etc.

I feel sorry for his brother by the way, but I have to admit: his nuclear laboratory looks awesome!

#13 Hologram

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Posted 25 February 2012 - 05:38 AM

The hate is strong in this one.

I feel that all this longevity and nootropic interest, stems from insecurity. Me being a prime example, spawned by a few choice people getting everything while others are left with nothing.

And yes, I feel bad for his brother as well, even if he worked 10x as hard, learned a bunch of mind tricks(mnemonics, meditation, etc.) and went on a really good nootropic regimen. Chances are he'd live out the rest of his days in his brother's shadow. Simply maddening.

Edited by Cerberus, 25 February 2012 - 05:39 AM.

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#14 hippocampus

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Posted 25 February 2012 - 09:12 PM

Would being supersmart/great achievements really make you happy?

Edited by hippocampus, 25 February 2012 - 09:12 PM.


#15 Gamerzneed

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Posted 25 February 2012 - 09:44 PM

Would being supersmart/great achievements really make you happy?


yes, that's why I check regularly through these forums

#16 Elus

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Posted 25 February 2012 - 11:11 PM

Would being supersmart/great achievements really make you happy?


Yes, probably.

#17 Elus

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Posted 26 February 2012 - 12:34 AM

Please read the full article before responding.

How is this possible? http://www.popsci.co...o-played-fusion

Reading this article almost made me want to cry because it wasn't until I was 14 I had a basic grasp on what the periodic table actually was... this kid memorized everything on it completely and understood it at the age of 10. When I was 10 I didn't even know the periodic table existed lol.

What is the cause of this boy's increased intelligence? Obviously there is no answer but I just hope more research can go into the field of increasing intelligence so one day everyone can be as smart as this boy or even 100x smarter.

It just pisses me off that I work my ass off everyday at school trying to understand scientific and mathematical concepts and here's this kid who learned it all when he was a fucking toddler.

Yes this is mostly a rant thread.


This kid...

Seriously, how is this even fair?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g91IQsS2spA

Edited by Elus, 26 February 2012 - 12:41 AM.


#18 DoomAndGloom

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Posted 26 February 2012 - 12:47 AM

Sometimes its their motivation and what they consider 'fun', and I think it is that for the most part.

Sometimes there are various genetic mutations and things that make people intensely smart (Look at John Von Neumann for example, it isn't proven obviously but I am pretty sure no one could do what he did with a normal mind), but a normal person can still do amazing things.

#19 The Immortalist

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Posted 26 February 2012 - 01:30 AM

Don't be too jealous. Many gifted kids have problems in other areas such as isolation, perfectionism, high expectations, underachievement, existential depression/anxiety etc.

I feel sorry for his brother by the way, but I have to admit: his nuclear laboratory looks awesome!


I have problems in all those areas and I doubt I'm extremely gifted. The kid in question for as far as I know doesn't have any of those problems AND he is a genius. He's won hundreds of thousands of dollars from science prizes, is the most revered person in his school for gifted children etc etc. Why shouldn't I be too jealous?

#20 Reformed-Redan

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Posted 26 February 2012 - 01:55 AM

And, the inferiority complex shows.

Edited by redan, 26 February 2012 - 01:55 AM.


#21 The Immortalist

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Posted 26 February 2012 - 02:03 AM

And, the inferiority complex shows.


I propose that an inferiority complex is good since it motivates those who are inferior to attain the thing that superior people have that they don't.

Edited by The Immortalist, 26 February 2012 - 02:04 AM.

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#22 The Immortalist

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Posted 26 February 2012 - 02:10 AM

Are there any cases of people being of average intelligence for a large portion of their life but then at some point their brain "awakened" and they became vastly more intelligent than they once were? A case such as that would be very interesting.

Edited by The Immortalist, 26 February 2012 - 02:10 AM.


#23 khemix

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Posted 26 February 2012 - 02:11 AM

Don't be too jealous. Many gifted kids have problems in other areas such as isolation, perfectionism, high expectations, underachievement, existential depression/anxiety etc.

I feel sorry for his brother by the way, but I have to admit: his nuclear laboratory looks awesome!


I have problems in all those areas and I doubt I'm extremely gifted. The kid in question for as far as I know doesn't have any of those problems AND he is a genius. He's won hundreds of thousands of dollars from science prizes, is the most revered person in his school for gifted children etc etc. Why shouldn't I be too jealous?

How do you become a genius? You are born one. It's simply genetic lottery. Some people are born very beautiful, some are talented musicians, and some have great innate intelligence. I too wish to understand the mechanisms of greater intelligence so that I can improve it, and I believe we all do to some extent which is why we desperately try all of these nootropic substances. As for you, I am sorry that you feel you have problems in different areas. Unfortunately life isn't always fair like that. You shouldn't be jealous because there really is nothing you can do about it - and you are wasting your time with this useless emotion. And believe me when I tell you that the grass always looks greener on the other side. I have known scores of profoundly gifted individuals throughout my life. They would wow me in class with their perceptiveness and mental agility. But they lived very miserable lives for the most part. I mean it was non-stop work and feelings of failure. A lot had mental problems as well. Others were just too lazy to apply themselves and simply coasted through life. Even so, these types have their purpose in life as we have ours. I mean Mozart is probably the epitome of a classical composer, and its not likely anyone will rival him any time soon. But how boring would music be if less talented composers never gave us their work?
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#24 DoomAndGloom

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Posted 26 February 2012 - 02:54 AM

It doesn't matter what you're born with, it matters what you do with what you have. Should we rate people on luck and chance, the improbability of a genetic mutation? Or should we rate them on their dedication, determination, and perseverance? I say the latter. And I say that as someone who might fall into the category of the former.

People like the young boy shown in the original post, or the one in the video, are few and far between. They aren't going to take everyone's careers and make it pointless to work, you still have much to do with your life.

I have known scores of profoundly gifted individuals throughout my life. They would wow me in class with their perceptiveness and mental agility. But they lived very miserable lives for the most part. I mean it was non-stop work and feelings of failure. A lot had mental problems as well. Others were just too lazy to apply themselves and simply coasted through life. Even so, these types have their purpose in life as we have ours. I mean Mozart is probably the epitome of a classical composer, and its not likely anyone will rival him any time soon. But how boring would music be if less talented composers never gave us their work?


Very true. I don't think I'd consider myself 'profoundly gifted' and I hate to say this since it makes me sound arrogant, but I am quite intelligent. If you believe IQ is an adequate comparator: when my elementary school tested my IQ in 5th grade it was rated at 146 or so (and yes it was a professionally done test, not some free online test). However, since about the age of 9 or 10 I've had some of what you might call mental problems: introversion, some inability to handle certain social situations (usually I don't know when people are sad or angry, and if I can tell I usually have no idea what to do or say), very severe depression that has bordered on suicidalism (though I've never actually seriously considered going through with it because of my personal life philosophy, lets just hope I never happen to take drugs that inhibit my reasoning), and other similar things. I also have the same issues you've mentioned with regards to being too lazy to apply myself and simply coasting through life. Interestingly enough that supplies me with very strong feelings of guilt, self-hate, and, as you said, failure, but that just tends to demotivate me further. Its a somewhat perpetual cycle that I can see into, but find it hard to do much about.

Anyway, that is just my opinion on the matter.

Edited by DoomAndGloom, 26 February 2012 - 02:58 AM.


#25 1thoughtMaze1

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Posted 26 February 2012 - 03:57 AM

There are no useless emotions
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#26 Adan

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Posted 26 February 2012 - 04:09 AM

If dual n-back programs work fine, if you train well, you conquer your anxiety, eat healthy, obtain the right nootropics then maybe a high IQ is within your reach. Maybe we want the wrong things, idk, being smarter wouldn't hurt though.

Edited by Adan, 26 February 2012 - 04:12 AM.


#27 khemix

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Posted 26 February 2012 - 04:20 AM

Very true. I don't think I'd consider myself 'profoundly gifted' and I hate to say this since it makes me sound arrogant, but I am quite intelligent. If you believe IQ is an adequate comparator: when my elementary school tested my IQ in 5th grade it was rated at 146 or so (and yes it was a professionally done test, not some free online test). However, since about the age of 9 or 10 I've had some of what you might call mental problems: introversion, some inability to handle certain social situations (usually I don't know when people are sad or angry, and if I can tell I usually have no idea what to do or say), very severe depression that has bordered on suicidalism (though I've never actually seriously considered going through with it because of my personal life philosophy, lets just hope I never happen to take drugs that inhibit my reasoning), and other similar things. I also have the same issues you've mentioned with regards to being too lazy to apply myself and simply coasting through life. Interestingly enough that supplies me with very strong feelings of guilt, self-hate, and, as you said, failure, but that just tends to demotivate me further. Its a somewhat perpetual cycle that I can see into, but find it hard to do much about.

Anyway, that is just my opinion on the matter.

The way I define profoundly gifted is 2 standard deviations above the norm, ie. 145+, so you'd fit the bill if that was indeed your score. I'm really sad to read about your depression and what appears to be apathy. You in fact remind me of a very talented friend who was studying physics. He had some mild form of autism and also had difficulty with relating to people and experienced very intense lows. Anyways, I mention him because he benefited from taking something called ephedrine which is a mild stimulant and said it helped with motivation when he was stressed out. You may be aware that stimulants increase the amount of dopamine and norepinephrine in your system and improve mood, alertness, and focus. Adderall is another good one but much more potent and can only be obtained by prescription. Wellbutrin is another intermediate option which is good at lifting the blues and doesn't have the horrendous side effect profile of SSRI type medications. I don't mean to innundate you with a laudry list of pills and I'm not neccessarily saying that they can patch up all your problems, but if your situation is severe enough they may be worth considering.

#28 The Immortalist

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Posted 26 February 2012 - 04:23 AM

People like the young boy shown in the original post, or the one in the video, are few and far between. They aren't going to take everyone's careers and make it pointless to work, you still have much to do with your life.


Thank you I think this is the most important point made in this thread so far. You made me realize even though the average mind is vastly inefficient compared to these prodigies we can still come up with ideas or create things they might not think of.

Maybe there are many things in science I will be unable to solve. But if I could at least solve one thing would I not be useless then? Even if I compare myself to a genius who solves many problems in science?

Edited by The Immortalist, 26 February 2012 - 04:30 AM.


#29 The Immortalist

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Posted 26 February 2012 - 04:34 AM

This kid...

Seriously, how is this even fair?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g91IQsS2spA


It isn't fair. It's akin to hacking on a videogame or finding a massive glitch on an online game that lets you kill everyone in one hit and makes you invulnerable to damage.

Edited by The Immortalist, 26 February 2012 - 04:35 AM.

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#30 Reformed-Redan

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Posted 26 February 2012 - 04:44 AM

And, the inferiority complex shows.


I propose that an inferiority complex is good since it motivates those who are inferior to attain the thing that superior people have that they don't.

An inferiority complex can never be a good thing, seriously. All it causes is butt frustration. Or rather, striving to attain something out of an inferiority complex is the wrong way to go about things.

Edited by redan, 26 February 2012 - 04:45 AM.






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