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How to become a genius?

genius child prodigy wunder kind superior humans superior intellect

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#31 1thoughtMaze1

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Posted 26 February 2012 - 07:50 AM

It's not fair! It's not fair! Haha... Sounds funny from someone named the Immortalist he he he

#32 fql

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Posted 26 February 2012 - 06:57 PM

I know some kid like this in real life. Fucking autistic savants. Shit's OP.

Edited by juryben, 26 February 2012 - 06:58 PM.


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#33 hippocampus

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Posted 26 February 2012 - 08:05 PM

Would being supersmart/great achievements really make you happy?


yes, that's why I check regularly through these forums

I meant that there is difference between being smart and intelligent. While being "smart" can add new quality to life I don't think it's linked exclusively to being genious or very intelligent. For me, knowing a lot makes me happy, but I will achieve that with learning not with boosting my IQ.

Don't be too jealous. Many gifted kids have problems in other areas such as isolation, perfectionism, high expectations, underachievement, existential depression/anxiety etc.

I feel sorry for his brother by the way, but I have to admit: his nuclear laboratory looks awesome!


I have problems in all those areas and I doubt I'm extremely gifted. The kid in question for as far as I know doesn't have any of those problems AND he is a genius. He's won hundreds of thousands of dollars from science prizes, is the most revered person in his school for gifted children etc etc. Why shouldn't I be too jealous?

How do you become a genius? You are born one. It's simply genetic lottery. Some people are born very beautiful, some are talented musicians, and some have great innate intelligence. I too wish to understand the mechanisms of greater intelligence so that I can improve it, and I believe we all do to some extent which is why we desperately try all of these nootropic substances. As for you, I am sorry that you feel you have problems in different areas. Unfortunately life isn't always fair like that. You shouldn't be jealous because there really is nothing you can do about it - and you are wasting your time with this useless emotion. And believe me when I tell you that the grass always looks greener on the other side. I have known scores of profoundly gifted individuals throughout my life. They would wow me in class with their perceptiveness and mental agility. But they lived very miserable lives for the most part. I mean it was non-stop work and feelings of failure. A lot had mental problems as well. Others were just too lazy to apply themselves and simply coasted through life. Even so, these types have their purpose in life as we have ours. I mean Mozart is probably the epitome of a classical composer, and its not likely anyone will rival him any time soon. But how boring would music be if less talented composers never gave us their work?

Genius != high IQ.
Genius is made, mutliple factors (internal motivation, non-conformity, high intelligence and creativity),
intelligence is mostly inborn (and you cannot affect it very much in later life).

Kim Peek is not a genius, he is just a stupid man, who knows to calculate and do some other things very fast. People with absolute memory aren't genius. Leonardo da Vinci is a genius, he was creative and intelligent. So was Nikola Tesla. But they weren't savants and didn't have absolute memory.
Being smart is not the same as being savant. I know a lot of people who have good grades and high IQ and know a lot of things but they can't think critically. This is something you would achieve with drugs or sth like that. It requiers broad knowledge and not fixation to one side of the problem (and also being sensitive to problems).

I don't use nootropics to boost my IQ, I use them to learn faster and longer, to have more energy and motivation (well, I don't really need noots for that :)), to achieve more in less time and to forget less. If I'd want to become a genius I'd do only one thing for 10 years everyday (e.g. play an instrument) - but then I wouldn't have time to seek knowledge from different areas.

Edited by hippocampus, 26 February 2012 - 08:07 PM.

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#34 Elus

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 12:31 AM

I've thought about this a little since I posted the video on the math and science prodigy. I realize that I do feel frustration, but I thought of three things that made it less bothersome:
1. I think it's important to consider the fact that we're all very lucky to be born or alive at all, so we should cherish the chance to make the most of what we've got. We're just some creatures on a rock, orbiting a fireball at just the right distance so that we might eek out an existence for ouselves.
2. We might be able to alter our intelligence dramatically in the foreseeable future. Is is worth being bitter in the meantime? Perhaps not.
3. The advances made by prodigies ultimately come back around and help us normal people as well. Perhaps it is through the work of geniuses, that we can all one day have a chance to experience being at that level as well (I.e. a genius like Kurzweil bettering life for the disabled and organizing a movement to shape the future).

Edited by Elus, 27 February 2012 - 12:32 AM.

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#35 hippocampus

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 06:33 AM

This isn't something you would achieve with drugs or sth like that. It requiers broad knowledge and not fixation to one side of the problem (and also being sensitive to problems).

correcting my post here, because I can't edit it anymore

Edited by hippocampus, 27 February 2012 - 06:36 AM.


#36 jillin

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 04:46 AM

The least productive thing you can do as an intellectual human being is to try to be as accomplished as these "genius" individuals. You literally gain nothing in brooding over how these unique few are better than you in an arbitrary subject or task. In the end, the amount of time you've spent playing the deluded catch-up game [there is nothing to catch up to begin with, one needs to grasp this and just move on] will have been put to complete waste as you will still be in their shadows. I admire Einstein, my old Uni Neuro-anatomy professor, Lance Armstrong and quite a few other people; I don't spend my precious time feeling inferior, I spend it acknowledging their genius and building upon it by going through academia and accomplishing more than I would be accomplishing if I had done the prior.
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#37 absent minded

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 04:14 PM

I've thought about this a little since I posted the video on the math and science prodigy. I realize that I do feel frustration, but I thought of three things that made it less bothersome:
1. I think it's important to consider the fact that we're all very lucky to be born or alive at all, so we should cherish the chance to make the most of what we've got. We're just some creatures on a rock, orbiting a fireball at just the right distance so that we might eek out an existence for ouselves.
2. We might be able to alter our intelligence dramatically in the foreseeable future. Is is worth being bitter in the meantime? Perhaps not.
3. The advances made by prodigies ultimately come back around and help us normal people as well. Perhaps it is through the work of geniuses, that we can all one day have a chance to experience being at that level as well (I.e. a genius like Kurzweil bettering life for the disabled and organizing a movement to shape the future).


Interesting and uplifting points. I share the same view.

Doesn't evolution imply that complexity cannot exist without simplicity? Oh crap, this thought just backfired on me. Scientists do perform weird science experiments on "lesser" creatures. My god, we should all form a secret organization to assassinate people too smart for our own good... i'm obviously kidding.

Edited by absent minded, 28 February 2012 - 04:14 PM.


#38 Raptor87

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 12:36 AM

What is more sad is that there´s countless of prodigies that are gifted who end up in a non stimulating environment, or they just get tired of school and expectations which ultimately makes them as average as anyone else.

I can relate to the OP. I was put in an experimental class when I was young, I had a rough upbringing and basically fell from a stimulating environment to a destructive one. I also have apnoea which impairs the brain. Sometimes I wonder what would have been! I also wonder if I can still today at the age of 29 do something to awake myself if had any potential that was lost. But that´s just daydreaming and wishing for something that probably isn´t there.

For the OP. Try to accept who you are and what you have! And stop dwelling in your head about things. Do what you can, if there is something that help you in your life, it will come to you. Great things become well known, if there was such a thing that would make us more intelligent, then we all would know about it.

Good luck!

#39 Destiny's Equation

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 01:15 AM

Articles like this remind me of how cruel and unfair life is. I was once a high-IQ individual, but never accomplished anything thanks to living with an abusive mom who drove me to insanity.

I could have ended up like him. And instead here I am, unemployed and living with my mother at age 25, full of numerous conditions resulting from 20 years of medical neglect.

As the saying goes you can’t pick your relatives.
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#40 tunt01

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 02:51 AM

NGF eyedrops.

http://www.longecity...-and-longevity/

If I'm not mistaken," she said, "I can say my mental capacity is greater than when I was 20 because it has been enriched by so many experiences, in the same way that my curiosity and desire to be close to those who suffer has not diminished."

According to Pietro Calissano, who collaborated with the professor on an article for Scientific American in which she announced her discovery in 1979, NGF may have played a direct role in her amazing vitality. "Every day, she takes NGF in the form of eye drops," he said, "but I can't say for sure if this is her secret. At the start, it seemed this molecule's effect was restricted to acting on the peripheral nervous system, but then it emerged that it has a very important role in the brain. Contrary to what was believed, the brain does not have a rigid structure but is in continuous movement, and NGF helps neurons – which we begin to lose between 10 and 15 years old – survive."

#41 nito

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 12:59 PM

NGF eyedrops.

http://www.longecity...-and-longevity/

If I'm not mistaken," she said, "I can say my mental capacity is greater than when I was 20 because it has been enriched by so many experiences, in the same way that my curiosity and desire to be close to those who suffer has not diminished."

According to Pietro Calissano, who collaborated with the professor on an article for Scientific American in which she announced her discovery in 1979, NGF may have played a direct role in her amazing vitality. "Every day, she takes NGF in the form of eye drops," he said, "but I can't say for sure if this is her secret. At the start, it seemed this molecule's effect was restricted to acting on the peripheral nervous system, but then it emerged that it has a very important role in the brain. Contrary to what was believed, the brain does not have a rigid structure but is in continuous movement, and NGF helps neurons – which we begin to lose between 10 and 15 years old – survive."


In terms of NGF i have been taking fungi perfect lions mane liquid.It's appearantly meant to be the real lions mane that is meant to work. I have been taking it for a 2 months roughly. It's hard to evaluate the effects tbh. Perhaps i should put the drops in my eye instead of under the tounge but then again considering the alcohol burn my tounge sligthly, it would probably hurt my eye twice as much. : /

#42 renfr

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 01:16 PM

Is noopept good to produce NGF?

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#43 kurdishfella

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Posted 09 August 2019 - 12:51 AM

But whatever this kids wasting his time on his useless research. He's going to die and be forgotten like everyone else. If he was truly a genius he would be working on aging research not this physics nuclear crap. Such a shame really.

Lol someone is scared of dying.


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