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GHK tripeptide resets DNA. Brain, capillary, skin etc regeneration.

ghk dna repair. brain skin capillary regeneratin

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#811 Jesuisfort

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Posted 01 July 2018 - 10:08 AM

Hi, I read somewhere that GHK-CU human production is about 200 mcg /ml  , people have 4 to 6 L of blood

 

So If we do the math :  200x1000x4=800 000 mcg of GHK-cu =  800 mg 

 

So  a human has 800mg of ghk cu in his body 

 

So 2 mg,  4mg... 10 mg , will probably do nothing ?


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#812 smithx

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Posted 04 July 2018 - 08:26 PM

A 100-200 mgs dosage in humans has been mentioned.

 

Also, posters have mentioned that at least GHK-Cu is not expensive.

 

But where can you find 100-200 mgs for a price which is not expensive?

 

Peptide Sciences have 200 mgs of GHK-Cu for $240, which would be unaffordable for regular use.

 

Or, perhaps I've misunderstood the dosage/frequency.

 

Any clarification will be appreciated.

 

This article is an overview of the effects of GHK: https://www.hindawi....ri/2014/151479/

 

This section talks about dosing, more interesting parts with my bolding:

 

GHK, abundantly available at low cost in bulk quantities, is a potential treatment for a variety of disease conditions associated with aging. The molecule is very safe and no issues have ever arisen during its use as a skin cosmetic or in human wound healing studies.

GHK has a very high affinity for Cu(2+) (pK of association = 16.4) and can easily obtain copper from the blood’s albumin bound Cu(2+) (pK of association = 16.2) [3]. Most of our key experiments used a 1 : 1 mixture of copper-free GHK and GHK : Cu(2+). In wound healing experiments, the addition of copper strongly enhanced healing. However, others often obtain effective results without added copper.

Cells within tissues are under the influence of many other regulatory molecules. Thus, GHK would be expected to influence the cells’ gene expression to be more similar to that of a person of age 20–25, an age when the afflictions of aging are very rare. Based on our studies, in which GHK was injected intraperitoneally once daily to induce systemic wound healing throughout the body, we estimate about 100–200 mgs of GHK will produce therapeutic actions in humans. But even this may overestimate the necessary effective dosage of the molecule. Most cultured cells respond maximally to GHK at 1 nanoM. GHK has a half-life of about 0.5 to 1 hour in plasma and two subsequent tissue repair studies in rats found that injecting GHK intraperitoneally 10 times daily lowered the necessary dosage by approximately 100-fold in contrast to our earlier studies [38, 65].

The most likely effective dosage of GHK was given to rats for healing bone fractures. This mixture of small molecules included Gly-His-Lys (0.5 μg/kg), dalargin (1.2 μg/kg) (an opioid-like synthetic drug), and the biological peptide thymogen (0.5 μg/kg) (L-glutamyl-L-tryptophan) to heal bones. The total peptide dosage is about 2.2 μg/kg or, if scaled for the human body, about 140 μg per injection with 10 treatments per day [38, 65].

The use of portable continuous infusion pumps for a treatment might maintain an effective level in the plasma and extracellular fluid with the need for much less GHK. Possibly the peptide could be administered with a transdermal patch [66]. Another approach could be to use peptide-loaded liposomes as an oral delivery system for uptake into the intestinal wall without significant breakdown [67, 68].

 

 


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#813 ta5

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Posted 27 July 2018 - 11:45 AM

Int J Physiol Pathophysiol Pharmacol. 2018 Jun 25;10(3):132-138. eCollection 2018.

Sakuma S1, Ishimura M1, Yuba Y1, Itoh Y 1, Fujimoto Y1.
Despite evidence that tripeptide glycyl-ʟ-histidyl-ʟ-lysine (GHK) is an endogenous antioxidant, its mechanism and importance are not fully understood. In the present study, the ability of GHK to reduce levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Caco-2 cells was evaluated by flow cytometry with the oxidation-sensitive fluorescent dye 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. Further, types of ROS diminished by GHK were assessed by utilizing an electron spin resonance (ESR) spin-trapping technique. GHK reduced the tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced increase in ROS levels in Caco-2 cells at concentrations of 10 µM or less. Experiments utilizing an ESR spin-trapping technique revealed that, among hydroxyl (·OH), superoxide (O2-·), and peroxyl (ROO·) radicals generated by respective chemical reaction systems, GHK diminished signals of both ·OH and ROO·, but not O2-·. Additionally, the GHK effect on the signal of ·OH was much stronger than those of other well-known antioxidative, endogenous peptides, carnosine and reduced glutathione. These results suggest that GHK can function as an endogenous antioxidant in living organisms, possibly by diminishing ·OH and ROO·.
PMID: 30042814


#814 triguy

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Posted 28 July 2018 - 03:08 AM

Yep! I actually joined this forum to ask about this, but of course I couldn't post links at the time and so failed to generate interest:

 

http://www.longecity...-cu-internally/

 

The possible connection with GDF11 is particularly interesting, since blood proteins are often made by the liver (not sure about GDF11 itself, I don't think the researchers even know yet), and GHK was initially discovered as a factor that decreases the liver's production of a blood protein that increases with age (fibrinogen). Could be that GHK itself would increase production of GDF11. While GHK isn't cheap, I imagine it's far more affordable than a recombinant protein. And injections might not be necessary.

 

I guess the money was never there to do real medical research on this, and cosmetics = $$$ without the need for FDA approval. I'd definitely like to see more on this, but it's off-patent...

 

Edit: related thread here: http://www.longecity...-vascular-more/

 

 

 

what is a fair price for 10mg of GHK-cu????



#815 ta5

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Posted 18 May 2019 - 08:40 PM

Did anybody settle on a delivery method?  Would something like DMSO be helpful transporting it through the skin?

 

Dr. Pickart is now selling 3% GHK-Cu + DMSO body cream.

 

I wonder what folks here think of this? 

 

I was surprised he would use DMSO. I like the idea of increased absorption, but whenever someone suggests DMSO someone else always warns about absorbing toxins and microbes through your skin.



#816 JamesPaul

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Posted 16 June 2019 - 09:52 PM

Hi, I read somewhere that GHK-CU human production is about 200 mcg /ml  , people have 4 to 6 L of blood

 

So If we do the math :  200x1000x4=800 000 mcg of GHK-cu =  800 mg 

 

So  a human has 800mg of ghk cu in his body 

 

So 2 mg,  4mg... 10 mg , will probably do nothing ?

 

Earlier in this thread, someone quoted Dr. Loren Pickart as responding that a 20-to-25-year-old students had 200 ng/ml in their blood.  That is also stated in this paper:

 

skinbiology.com/Regenerative_and_Protective_Actions_of_GHKCu.pdf

 

One nanogram is a billionth of a gram.  A microgram (mcg) is a millionth of a gram.  So if someone has 4 liters of blood, 200 ng x 1000 x 4 = 800,000 ng = 800 micrograms = 0.8 mg.



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#817 Phoebus

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Posted 17 June 2019 - 04:50 PM

Dr. Pickart is now selling 3% GHK-Cu + DMSO body cream.

 

I wonder what folks here think of this? 

 

I was surprised he would use DMSO. I like the idea of increased absorption, but whenever someone suggests DMSO someone else always warns about absorbing toxins and microbes through your skin.

 

 

why on earth would you want to be absorbing that much free copper though? You only need very tiny amounts of copper and too much is very bad. 


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